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United States Patent 10,014,053
Sakui ,   et al. July 3, 2018
**Please see images for: ( Certificate of Correction ) **

Methods for backup sequence using three transistor memory cell devices

Abstract

Methods for a backup sequence includes reading first data from a first data memory to a page buffer, copying the first data from the page buffer to a backup page comprising three transistor memory cell devices, erasing the first data memory, programming the first data from the page buffer to a second data memory, and erasing the backup page.


Inventors: Sakui; Koji (Tokyo, JP), Feeley; Peter (Boise, ID)
Applicant:
Name City State Country Type

MICRON TECHNOLOGY, INC.

Boise

ID

US
Assignee: Micron Technology, Inc. (Boise, ID)
Family ID: 47743567
Appl. No.: 15/675,836
Filed: August 14, 2017


Prior Publication Data

Document IdentifierPublication Date
US 20170345501 A1Nov 30, 2017

Related U.S. Patent Documents

Application NumberFiling DatePatent NumberIssue Date
14455449Aug 8, 20149767904
13217867Aug 12, 20148804424

Current U.S. Class: 1/1
Current CPC Class: G11C 16/0433 (20130101); G11C 16/0483 (20130101); G11C 16/10 (20130101); G11C 16/0408 (20130101); G11C 16/26 (20130101)
Current International Class: G11C 16/10 (20060101); G11C 16/04 (20060101); G11C 16/26 (20060101)

References Cited [Referenced By]

U.S. Patent Documents
5754469 May 1998 Hung et al.
6304486 October 2001 Yano
6307807 October 2001 Sakui et al.
6370081 April 2002 Sakui et al.
6512703 January 2003 Sakui et al.
6657892 December 2003 Sakui et al.
6801458 October 2004 Sakui et al.
7031195 April 2006 Sato et al.
7099200 August 2006 Sakui
7173850 February 2007 Sakui et al.
7301809 November 2007 Sakui et al.
7332766 February 2008 Hasegawa et al.
7333369 February 2008 Sakui et al.
7388783 June 2008 Sakui
7463540 December 2008 Sakui et al.
7791952 September 2010 Roohparvar
7898859 March 2011 Ghodsi
2002/0039311 April 2002 Takeuchi
2003/0048661 March 2003 Sakui et al.
2004/0032788 February 2004 Sakui et al.
2004/0188710 September 2004 Koren et al.
2004/0240273 December 2004 Sakui
2005/0041476 February 2005 Sakui et al.
2005/0094431 May 2005 Sato et al.
2005/0218460 October 2005 Hasegawa et al.
2006/0239073 October 2006 Toda
2006/0245263 November 2006 Sakui
2007/0127292 June 2007 Sakui et al.
2007/0133282 June 2007 Sakui et al.
2007/0133283 June 2007 Sakui et al.
2008/0212373 September 2008 Hasegawa et al.
2009/0106481 April 2009 Yang et al.
2009/0193058 July 2009 Reid
2010/0329011 December 2010 Lee et al.
2011/0072200 March 2011 Lee et al.
Foreign Patent Documents
WO 2011/005665 Jan 2011 WO
Primary Examiner: King; Douglas
Attorney, Agent or Firm: Dicke, Billig & Czaja, PLLC

Parent Case Text



RELATED APPLICATION

This application is a Divisional of U.S. application Ser. No. 14/455,449, titled "MEMORY WITH THREE TRANSISTOR MEMORY CELL DEVICE," filed Aug. 8, 2014, now U.S. Pat. No. 9,767,904 issued on Sep. 19, 2017, which is a Divisional of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/217,867, titled "MEMORY WITH THREE TRANSISTOR MEMORY CELL DEVICE," filed Aug. 25, 2011, now U.S. Pat. No. 8,804,424 issued on Aug. 12, 2014, which are commonly assigned and incorporated in their entirety herein by reference.
Claims



What is claimed is:

1. A method for a backup sequence comprising: reading first data from a first data page of a memory array to a page buffer, wherein the first data page contains a first number of memory cells; copying the first data from the page buffer to a backup page containing a second number of three transistor memory cell devices, wherein the second number is less than the first number; erasing the first data memory; programming the first data from the page buffer to a second data page of the memory array, wherein the second data page contains the first number of memory cells; and erasing the backup page.

2. The method of claim 1, wherein the backup page is a first page of backup memory cells of an array of backup memory cells, and the first data is copied from the page buffer to the first page of backup memory cells of the array of backup memory cells.

3. The method of claim 1, further comprising loading second data to the page buffer, wherein the second data is random data.

4. The method of claim 1, wherein reading the first data from the first data pane of the memory array comprises reading the first data from only a portion of the first number memory cells of the first data page of the memory array.

5. The method of claim 4, wherein copying the first data from the page buffer to the backup page comprises copying the first data from a page buffer between the first data page of the memory array and the backup page.

6. The method of claim 1, further comprising connecting the first data page of the memory array to the page buffer through a first set of select transistors to copy the first data from the page buffer to the backup page, and connecting the backup page to the page buffer through a second set of select transistors to copy the first data from the page buffer to the backup page, wherein the page buffer is between the first set of select transistors and the second set of select transistors.

7. A method for a backup sequence comprising: reading first data from a first data memory to a page buffer, wherein the first data memory is a portion of a NAND architecture memory array; copying the first data from the page buffer to a backup page comprising three transistor memory cell devices comprising only a single memory cell between two select transistors; loading second data on a per byte basis to the page buffer containing the first data; erasing the first data from first data memory; programming the data from the page buffer to a second data memory; and erasing the backup page containing the copy of the first data.

8. The method of claim 7, wherein each of the three transistor memory cell devices comprises only a single memory cell between two select transistors.

9. The method of claim 7, wherein reading the first data from the first data memory to the page buffer comprises reading the first data from a data page of memory cells to the page buffer.

10. The method of claim 9, further comprising connecting memory cells of the data page of memory cells to the page buffer through a first set of select transistors.

11. The method of claim 10, wherein copying the first data from the page buffer to the backup page comprises connecting memory cells of the backup page to the page buffer through a second set of select transistors.

12. The method of claim 11, further comprising connecting the memory cells of the backup page to the page buffer, wherein the page buffer is between the first set of select transistors and the second set of select transistors.

13. A method for a backup sequence comprising: reading first data from a first data page of a memory array to a page buffer, wherein the first data page of the memory array is selectively connected to the page buffer through a first number of select transistors; copying the first data from the page buffer to a backup page comprising three transistor memory cell devices, wherein the backup page is selectively connected to the page buffer through a second number of select transistors less than the first number of transistors; erasing the first data page of the memory array; programming the first data from the page buffer to a second data page of the memory array; and erasing the backup page.

14. The method of claim 13, wherein copying the first data from the page buffer to the backup page comprises copying the first data from a page buffer between the backup page and the memory array.

15. The method of claim 13, wherein reading the first data from the first data page of the memory array to the page buffer comprises connecting the first data page to the page buffer through a first set of select transistors.

16. The method of claim 15, wherein connecting the first data page to the page buffer through the first set of select transistors comprises connecting only a portion of memory cells of the first data page to the page buffer.

17. A method for a backup sequence comprising: reading first data from a first data page of a memory array to a page buffer, copying the first data from the page buffer to a backup page comprising three transistor memory cell devices; erasing the first data page of the memory array; programming the first data from the page buffer to a second data page of the memory array; and erasing the backup page; wherein reading the first data from the first data page of the memory array to the page buffer comprises connecting the first data page to the page buffer through a first set of select transistors; wherein connecting the first data page to the page buffer through the first set of select transistors comprises connecting only a portion of memory cells of the first data page to the page buffer; and wherein connecting only the portion of memory cells of the first data page to the page buffer comprises connecting every other memory cell of the first data page to the page buffer.

18. The method of claim 16, wherein copying the first data from the page buffer to the backup page comprises connecting the backup page to the page buffer through a second set of select transistors.

19. The method of claim 18, wherein connecting the backup page to the page buffer through the second set of select transistors comprises connecting the backup page to the page buffer through the second set of select transistors while the first set of select transistors are deactivated.

20. The method of claim 13, further comprising: loading second data on a per byte basis to the page buffer; and programming the second data from the page buffer to the second data page, wherein programming the second data from the page buffer to the second data page is performed with programming the first data from the page buffer to the second data page.
Description



TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention relates generally to memory and in a particular embodiment the present invention relates to three transistor memory cell devices.

BACKGROUND

Non-volatile memory has evolved from the Electrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory (EEPROM). An EEPROM is a type of non-volatile ROM that can be erased by exposing it to an electrical charge. The EEPROM provides programming on a per-byte basis. However, the density of the EEPROM is limited by its larger cell size. Flash memory was designed to have both a smaller cell size and a faster programming rate than EEPROM.

Flash memory devices have developed into a popular source of non-volatile memory for a wide range of electronic applications. Flash memory devices typically use a one-transistor memory cell that allows for high memory densities, high reliability, and low power consumption. Common uses for flash memory include personal computers, flash drives, digital cameras, and cellular telephones. Program code and system data such as a basic input/output system (BIOS) are typically stored in flash memory devices for use in personal computer systems.

A typical flash memory comprises a memory array organized in columns and rows. Changes in threshold voltage of the memory cells, through programming of charge storage structures (e.g., floating gates or charge traps) or other physical phenomena (e.g., phase change or polarization), determine the data value of each cell. The cells are usually grouped into blocks. Each of the cells within a block can be electrically programmed, such as by charging the charge storage structure. The data in a cell of this type is determined by the presence or absence of the charge in the charge storage structure. The charge can be removed from the charge storage structure by an erase operation.

Flash memory having a NOR architecture provides a smaller cell size and, thus, the possibility of greater memory density as compared to the EEPROM. A NOR architecture flash memory comprises a memory cell having a drain contact coupled to a data line (e.g., bit line) and a source contact coupled to a source line. The trade-off to obtaining the smaller memory cell size with the NOR architecture flash memory was that NOR architecture memory was no longer programmable on a byte basis. Erase of NOR architecture flash memory is on a block basis. Programming of NOR architecture is on a word, byte, or bit basis. NOR architecture also uses a logical-to-physical address table and wear leveling algorithm during programming.

A NAND architecture flash memory is organized as series strings of memory cells. Each series string of memory cells comprises a number of flash memory cells coupled serially drain-to-source between a select gate drain (SGD) transistor and a select gate source (SGS) transistor. One end of the series string is coupled to its respective bit line and the other end is coupled to a source line. The NAND architecture provides higher memory cell density than EEPROM as well as faster programming. However, the NAND architecture eliminated random reading of memory cells. Each read is performed on page basis.

For the reasons stated above, and for other reasons stated below that will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon reading and understanding the present specification, there is a need in the art for memory having the benefits of both EEPROM and flash memory.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 shows a schematic diagram of one embodiment of a portion of a NAND architecture memory array.

FIG. 2 shows a schematic diagram of one embodiment of a three transistor memory device.

FIG. 3 shows a schematic diagram of one embodiment of a memory device in accordance with the embodiments of FIGS. 1 and 2.

FIG. 4 shows a block diagram of one embodiment of a memory device with both a parallel interface and a serial peripheral interface in accordance with the embodiment of FIG. 3.

FIGS. 5A and 5B show diagrams of two embodiments of memory incorporating backup pages.

FIG. 6 shows a flowchart of one embodiment of a method for performing a backup sequence using backup pages.

FIG. 7 shows a block diagram of one embodiment of a single NAND memory device in accordance with the embodiment of FIG. 3.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

In the following detailed description of the invention, reference is made to the accompanying drawings that form a part hereof and in which is shown, by way of illustration, specific embodiments in which the invention may be practiced. In the drawings, like numerals describe substantially similar components throughout the several views. These embodiments are described in sufficient detail to enable those skilled in the art to practice the invention. Other embodiments may be utilized and structural, logical, and electrical changes may be made without departing from the scope of the present invention. The following detailed description is, therefore, not to be taken in a limiting sense, and the scope of the present invention is defined only by the appended claims and equivalents thereof.

FIG. 1 illustrates a schematic diagram of a portion of a NAND architecture memory array 101 comprising series strings of non-volatile memory cells. While the subsequent discussion refers to a NAND memory device, the present embodiments are not limited to such an architecture but can be used in other memory device architectures as well.

The array comprises an array of non-volatile memory cells 101 (e.g., floating gate or charge trap transistors) arranged in columns such as series strings 104, 105. Each of the cells 101 is coupled drain to source in each series string 104, 105. An access line (e.g. word line) WL0-WL31 that spans across multiple series strings 104, 105 is connected to the control gates of each memory cell in a row in order to bias the control gates of the memory cells in the row. Data lines, such as even and odd bit lines BLe, BLo are coupled to the strings of memory cells and eventually connected to sense circuitry (e.g., sense amplifiers) (not shown) that detect the state of each cell by sensing current or voltage on a particular bit line.

Each series string 104, 105 of memory cells is coupled to a source line 106 by a source select gate 116, 117 and to an individual bit line BLe, BLo by a drain select gate 112, 113. The source select gates 116, 117 are controlled by a source select gate control line SG(S) 118 coupled to their control gates. The drain select gates 112, 113 are controlled by a drain select gate control line SG(D) 114.

Each memory cell can be programmed as single level cell (SLC) memory or multilevel cell (MLC) memory. Each cell's threshold voltage is indicative of the data that are stored in the cell. For example, in an SLC, a V.sub.t of 0.5V might indicate a programmed cell while a V.sub.t of -0.5V might indicate an erased cell. The MLC uses multiple V.sub.t ranges that each indicate a different state. Multilevel cells can take advantage of the analog nature of a traditional flash cell by assigning a bit pattern to a specific voltage range that can be stored on the cell. This technology permits the storage of more than one bit per cell (e.g., two bits per cell or more), depending on the quantity of voltage ranges assigned to the cell.

FIG. 2 illustrates a three transistor memory cell device 200. The three transistor memory cell device 200 comprises a memory cell 203 and two select gates 201, 202 (e.g., select transistors).

The memory cell 203 of the three transistor memory cell device 200 can comprise the same type of memory cell (e.g., floating gate or charge trap transistor) as is used in the array of FIG. 1. The drain of the memory cell 203 is coupled to a first select gate 201 and the source of the memory cell 203 is coupled to a second select gate 202. The drain of the first select gate 201 is then coupled to a bit line BL (not shown) and the source of the second select gate 202 is coupled to a source line SL (not shown). Operation (e.g., programming, erasing, reading) of the three transistor memory cell device 200 is substantially similar to the operation of the non-volatile memory cell series strings of FIG. 1.

For example, to program the memory cell 203, the control gate CG is biased with a programming voltage (V.sub.pgm) while the bit line BL is biased with an enable voltage (e.g., 0V). SG1 is biased with a voltage (e.g., V.sub.CC) to activate the first select gate 201 while SG2 is biased with a voltage (e.g., 0V) to deactivate the second select gate 202. After a threshold voltage of the memory cell 203 reaches a target threshold voltage, the bit line BL can be biased with an inhibit voltage (e.g., V.sub.CC).

An example of an erase operation includes biasing the control gate CG of the memory cell 203 at a reference potential (e.g., 0V) or allowing it to float. The semiconductor tub that comprises the memory cell 203 is then biased with a large positive voltage (e.g., 18-20V). Both select gates 201, 202 can be deactivated by biasing the SG1 and SG2 lines at 0V.

An example of a read operation includes biasing the control gate CG of the memory cell 203 at a read voltage (V.sub.READ) that is of a sufficient voltage to turn on the memory cell 203. The first select gate 201 is activated to couple the drain connection of the memory cell 203 to a bit line. The second select gate 202 is activated to couple the source connection of the memory cell 203 to the source line. A sense circuit that is coupled to the bit line can then determine a threshold voltage on the memory cell 203 in response to a voltage or current detected on the bit line.

FIG. 3 illustrates a schematic diagram of one embodiment of a memory device that incorporates both a non-volatile memory array 101, such as illustrated in FIG. 1, and an array of three transistor memory cell devices 300, such as illustrated in FIG. 2. Sense circuitry and page buffers 301 are located between the non-volatile memory array 101 and the array of three transistor memory cell devices 300.

As described previously, the sense circuitry determines whether a memory cell has reached a target threshold voltage by detecting either current or voltage on the bit line coupled to the sense circuitry. The page buffers can be used for temporary storage of data that is being loaded into either the memory cells of the non-volatile memory array or the three transistor memory cell devices.

The array of three transistor memory cell devices 300 comprises at least one three transistor memory cell device 200. Each three transistor memory cell device is coupled to a different bit line BL1, BL2, BL3. An enable/disable gate (e.g., transistor) 330-332 couples a respective bit line BL1, BL2, BL3 to the sense circuitry and page buffers 301. An enable/disable signal is coupled to a control gate of each of the enable/disable gates 330-332. In one embodiment, the array of three transistor memory cell devices 300 is a page of memory.

In one embodiment, when the enable/disable signal is 0V, all of the bit lines BL1, BL2, BL3 are disconnected from the sense circuitry and page buffers 301. When the enable/disable signal is a voltage such that the enable/disable gates 330-332 are activated, all of the bit lines BL1, BL2, BL3 are coupled to the sense circuitry and page buffers 301 simultaneously.

Similarly, the bit lines BLo, BLe of the non-volatile memory array 101 are also each coupled to the sense circuitry and page buffers 301 through a different enable/disable gate 310-315 (e.g., transistor). Control gates for each of the odd bit line enable/disable gates 310-312 are coupled to an odd bit line enable signal ENABLE BLo. Control gates for each of the even bit line enable/disable gates 313-315 are coupled to an even bit line enable signal ENABLE BLe.

Thus, in one embodiment, when the ENABLE BLo signal is a voltage that is greater than 0V and the ENABLE BLe signal is 0V, the enable/disable gates 310-312 for the odd bit lines are activated to couple the odd bit lines to the sense circuitry and page buffers 301 while simultaneously disconnecting the even bit lines from the sense circuitry and page buffers 301. Also in one embodiment, when the ENABLE BLe signal is a voltage that is greater than 0V and the ENABLE BLo signal is 0V, the enable/disable gates 313-315 for the even bit lines are activated to couple the even bit lines to the sense circuitry and page buffers 301 while simultaneously disconnecting the odd bit lines from the sense circuitry and page buffers 301.

It can be seen from the above operation description that when the series strings of memory cells coupled to the even bit lines are to be read by the sense circuitry 301, the even bit line enable/disable gates 313-315 are enabled and the odd bit line enable/disable gates 310-312 are disabled. When the series strings of memory cells coupled to the odd bit lines are to be read by the sense circuitry 301, the odd bit line enable/disable gates 310-312 are enabled and the even bit line enable/disable gates 313-315 are disabled. When the array of three transistor memory cell devices 300 are to be read by the sense circuitry 301, the enable/disable gates 330-332 are enabled and both the odd and even enable/disable gates 310-315 are disabled.

Locating the sense circuitry and page buffers 301 between the non-volatile memory array 101 and the array of three transistor memory cell devices 300 can provide numerous benefits. For example, the bit line length for a bit line coupled to the three transistor memory cell device 200 can be shorter than that of the non-volatile memory array 101. This can result in a reduced bit line capacitance as well as bit line resistance for the three transistor memory cell device 200.

As described previously, in order to attain a smaller cell size when migrating from byte EEPROM to NOR Flash memory to NAND Flash memory, byte programming was eliminated while Logical-to-Physical address (LP) tables and wear leveling were implemented. Therefore, the hybrid three transistor memory cell devices implement the byte programming while keeping the smaller NAND memory cell size. Since the array of three transistor memory cell devices can act as a cache for the non-volatile memory array, per byte basis programming is available because the erase block size is the same as the page size and the page buffers can be utilized for the byte programming.

FIG. 4 illustrates a block diagram of one embodiment of a memory device 400 that incorporates the embodiment of FIG. 3 as well as a serial peripheral interface (SPI) input/output (I/O) 430. The memory device 400 additionally has parallel I/O 431. Each of these I/O 430, 431 can be coupled to an external device (e.g., processor, controller) (not shown) for controlling and/or communicating with the memory device 400.

The SPI I/O 430 provides a serial means for communicating with an external device. The external device can thus communicate with the memory device 400 exclusively over either the parallel I/O 431 or the SPI I/O 430. In another embodiment, the external device can communicate over both the parallel I/O 431 and the SPI I/O 430.

The memory device 400 additionally comprises a memory array 403. In one embodiment, the memory array 403 comprises a NAND architecture with MLC memory cells. The memory device 400 also comprises a three transistor memory cell device array 401. In one embodiment, the memory array 403 is a 64 Gb memory array and the three transistor memory cell device array 401 is a 128 Mb array.

Sense circuitry and page buffers 405 are coupled between the two memory arrays 401, 403. As previously described with reference to FIG. 3, the sense circuitry and page buffers 405 are commonly used by both memory arrays 401, 403 and their individual access to the sense circuitry and page buffers 405 is controlled by enable/disable gates.

Parallel 419 and serial 418 controllers control operation of the memory device 400. While shown as separate controller blocks 418, 419, in one embodiment the parallel and serial controllers 418, 419 can be one controller block 420 that shares common circuitry between the two controller functions 418, 419. For example, the common controller circuitry 420 can use separate software routines for the individual parallel and serial controller functions 418, 419.

The controller circuitry 420 is coupled to the sense circuitry and page buffers 405. In one embodiment, the controller circuitry 420 is responsible for controlling access to the common sense circuitry and page buffers by the memory array 403 and the three transistor memory cell device array 401.

Error correction code (ECC) and status registers 407 are also coupled to the controller circuitry 420. The controller circuitry 420 can use these registers during operation to store ECC data and memory status data.

FIGS. 5A and 5B each illustrate a different embodiment of a non-volatile memory device incorporating backup pages that can be used to backup data during memory transfer operations. Thus, if power is lost or data is corrupted during the transfer of data (e.g., wear leveling) between memory pages, the backup pages will have the original data for restoring to a particular data page. In one embodiment, the backup pages comprise three transistor memory cell devices.

FIG. 5A illustrates an embodiment where each backup page 501-504 is located after a predetermined quantity of data pages 510-513. In one embodiment, a backup page 501-504 is located after every four data pages 510-513. In such an embodiment, the backup page 501 can share common sense circuitry and page buffers with one of the adjacent groups of data pages 510 or 511.

The data pages are SLC memory. In one embodiment, there are 512 data pages and 128 backup pages. Alternate embodiments can use other page quantities and sizes for both the data page and the backup page.

FIG. 5B illustrates another embodiment of the non-volatile device with backup pages. This embodiment locates the backup pages 531 in one grouping while the data pages 530 are grouped separately.

FIG. 6 illustrates a flowchart of one embodiment of a method for performing a backup sequence using backup pages. In one embodiment, this method can use three transistor memory cell devices as the backup pages.

The old data is first read into a page buffer 601. The old data is then copied from the page buffer to a backup page 602. Random data is then loaded into the page buffers 603 that are coupled to the backup page. The old data that is still in the data page is erased 605. At this point, the old data is now in the backup page and erased from the original data page.

The data from the page buffer can then be programmed to a new data page 607. All backup pages can now be erased 609 to be ready for future transfers.

FIG. 7 illustrates a block diagram of one embodiment of a memory device 700 that incorporates the embodiment of FIG. 3. The memory device 400 additionally has NAND I/O 731 that can be coupled to an external device (e.g., processor, controller) (not shown) for controlling and/or communicating with the memory device 700.

The memory device 700 comprises a memory array 703. In one embodiment, the memory array 703 comprises a NAND architecture with MLC memory cells. The memory device 700 also comprises a three transistor memory cell device array 701. In one embodiment, the memory array 703 is a 64 Gb memory array and the three transistor memory cell device array 701 is a 128 Mb array.

Sense circuitry and page buffers 705 are coupled between the two memory arrays 701, 703. As previously described with reference to FIG. 3, the sense circuitry and page buffers 705 are commonly used by both memory arrays 701, 703 and their individual access to the sense circuitry and page buffers 705 is controlled by enable/disable gates.

A NAND controller 720 provides a controlling function for the memory device 700. The controller 720 can control the memory operations (e.g., programming, erasing, reading) as well as other functions of the memory 700.

The controller 720 is coupled to the sense circuitry and page buffers 705. In one embodiment, the controller 720 is responsible for controlling access to the common sense circuitry and page buffers by the memory array 703 and the three transistor memory cell device array 701.

Error correction code (ECC) and status registers 707 are also coupled to the controller 720. The controller 720 can use these registers during operation to store ECC data and memory status data.

CONCLUSION

One or more embodiments can use three transistor memory cell devices that can provide faster access, as well as random access, without using a logical to physical table. Sense circuitry and page buffers are located between, and shared with, a NAND memory array. The three transistor memory cell devices can be used in backup pages of memory so that random data on a per byte basis can be loaded into the page buffers to be programmed into the three transistor memory cell devices without the logical to physical table.

Although specific embodiments have been illustrated and described herein, it will be appreciated by those of ordinary skill in the art that any arrangement that is calculated to achieve the same purpose may be substituted for the specific embodiments shown. Many adaptations of the invention will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art. Accordingly, this application is intended to cover any adaptations or variations of the invention. It is intended that this invention be limited only by the following claims and equivalents thereof.

* * * * *

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