Easy To Use Patents Search & Patent Lawyer Directory

At Patents you can conduct a Patent Search, File a Patent Application, find a Patent Attorney, or search available technology through our Patent Exchange. Patents are available using simple keyword or date criteria. If you are looking to hire a patent attorney, you've come to the right place. Protect your idea and hire a patent lawyer.


Search All Patents:



  This Patent May Be For Sale or Lease. Contact Us

  Is This Your Patent? Claim This Patent Now.



Register or Login To Download This Patent As A PDF




United States Patent Application 20050042030
Kind Code A1
Fu, Changbiao February 24, 2005

Drainage and irrigation approach and structure as well as its implementation

Abstract

This Invention relates to a drainage and irrigation approach, which primarily includes the initial stage of green belt irrigation and the later stage of rainwater drainage. The drainage and irrigation structures employed in this approach consist of curb stones, edge stones, border stones, and boundary stones, which may have combinations of drainage troughs [3], rainwater ports [6] and drainage holes [4], or drainage troughs [3] and rainwater ports [6], or drainage troughs [3] and drainage holes [4]. Depending on the conditions of planted areas, the drainage and irrigation structures discussed above may be deployed along roads, landscaping on top of architectural structures, planted areas, seeded strips or barren hill slopes.


Inventors: Fu, Changbiao; (Beijing, CN)
Correspondence Address:
    Drummond & Duckworth
    East Tower Suite 440
    5000 Birch Street
    Newport Beach
    CA
    92660
    US
Serial No.: 471198
Series Code: 10
Filed: August 18, 2004
PCT Filed: November 29, 2002
PCT NO: PCT/CN02/00855

Current U.S. Class: 405/36; 404/2; 405/46
Class at Publication: 405/036; 405/046; 404/002
International Class: E01F 005/00


Foreign Application Data

DateCodeApplication Number
Nov 30, 2001CN01275540.0

Claims



1. A drainage and irrigation approach suitable for both rainwater and road cleaning water; the said approach consists of two stages: the initial stage of green belt irrigation and the later stage of rainwater drainage; firstly, rainwater at the beginning of a rainfall or in the event of road cleaning with debris flows through drainage holes in the drainage and irrigation structure into the planted areas, thereby providing the nutrients and water necessary for plant growth; secondly, if the rain continues falling and the rainwater rises to a certain level, clear water flows through the rainwater ports in the drainage and irrigation structure into the underground pipes and corresponding connected pipelines; the clear rainwater is then stored in underground reservoirs for storage or flows into rivers and lakes; from there it evaporates into the ecological cycle of nature.

2. The drainage and irrigation approach as described in claim 1, wherein, for the initial green belt irrigation stage, flat curb stones are laid horizontally along one side or both sides of the road, their top surface flush with the pavement surface; the curb barrier stones are laid perpendicularly to and tightly against the flat curb stones along the outer edge of the road, their top surface higher than the road pavement; on either side of the road, there is a green belt [A] on the outer side of the curb barrier stones; the surface elevation [e] of the green belt is lower than the bottom edge of the exit opening of the drainage hole in each of the said curb barrier stones so that there is an elevation drop; at the beginning of a rainfall, the rainwater flows along a drainage channel consisting of a trough in each flat curb stone and a drainage hole in each curb barrier stone. It then flows through the exit opening of the drainage hole onto the green belt [A].

3. The drainage and irrigation approach as described in claim 1, wherein, for the later drainage stage, rainwater ports are installed at a certain interval in the row of curb barrier stones; the rainwater ports are connected to the underground drainage pipeline; the highest position of the said drainage hole in each curb barrier stone should be lower than the bottom edge [b] of the said rainwater port; when the rainwater accumulates in the green belt [A] and the water level rises to a point [a] above the rainwater port, it flows through the outlet into the underground pipeline; the drainage holes in curb barrier stones can also effectively prevent floating debris in the green belt from entering the rainwater ports so that the water flowing into the outlets is virtually filtered.

4. The drainage and irrigation approach as described in claim 1, wherein the following engineering requirements must be met: the drainage initiation point of the pavement is at Elevation b, the drainage initiation point of the rainwater port is at Elevation a, the drainage or irrigation initiation point of the curb is at Elevation C, the blocking point of the floating debris in the green belt is at Elevation d, and the water accumulation initiation point in the green belt and the seeded strips is at Elevation e.

5. The drainage and irrigation approach as described in claim 4, wherein the elevation between b and C is 6 cm; the elevation between b and d is about 12 cm; and the elevation between d and e is about 5 cm.

6. The curb stones used in a type of irrigation and drainage structure, which curb stones consist of flat curb stones and curb barrier stones having the following features: each of the said flat curb stones has a longitudinal drainage trough in its top surface and each of the said curb barrier stones has a half-circular cut-out at either end so that a drainage hole is formed when two curb barrier stones are laid end-to-end; the said longitudinal trough on the flat curb stones and the said drainage holes on the curb barrier stones are interconnected to form an unobstructed channel for water flows.

7. The curb stones as described in claim 6, wherein the said curb barrier stones have rainwater ports installed at a certain interval and the rainwater ports are connected to underground pipelines; the highest point of the drainage hole on each curb barrier stone is lower than the bottom edge of the said rainwater port.

8. The curb stones as described in claim 6, wherein the said longitudinal trough stretches on the top surface of the said flat curb stone and along the upper edge close to the said curb barrier stone; it is a trough cut along the said upper edge of the flat curb stone.

9. The curb stones as described in claim 6, wherein the said drainage hole on the curb barrier stone goes through either end of the curb barrier stone; its opening at the flat curb stone side is the water entry and on the outer side of the curb barrier stone is the water exit; the bottom edge of the entry opening is flush with the bottom of the longitudinal trough on the flat curb stone; the exit opening is somewhat lower than the entry opening to produce a horizontal elevation drop; the entry opening and the exit opening may be set level.

10. The curb stones as described in claim 8, wherein the said longitudinal trough is a half-circular trough cut along the edge of the flat curb stone close to the said curb barrier stone; additional cut-outs may or may not be made at proper positions along the trough in correspondence to the drainage holes on the curb barrier stones.

11. The curb stones as described in claim 6, wherein the half-circular drainage hole cut-out in the curb barrier stone may be a horizontal or a slanting trough; in other words, its entry and its exit may be at the same elevation or may have a proper elevation drop.

12. The edge stones used in a second type of irrigation and drainage structure, which edge stones consist of flat stones and barrier stones having the following features: Each of the said flat stones has a longitudinal trough on the side of its top surface close to the barrier stones, and the longitudinal trough connects with a drainage hole at either end of each barrier stone and several evenly spaced drainage holes in the middle section of the barrier stone to form an unobstructed channel for water flows.

13. The edge stones as described in claim 12, wherein the bottom edge of the multiple holes in the said barrier stone is flush with the bottom of the longitudinal trough in the flat stone; the drainage hole at either end of the barrier stone is flush with and connects to the bottom of the longitudinal trough; the hole is a half-circular trough at the end of each barrier stone; when two barrier stones are set end-to-end, a circular drainage hole is formed.

14. The edge stones as described in claim 12, wherein the said flat stone and the said barrier stone may form an "L"-shaped or "--.vertline."-shaped structure.

15. The edge stones as described in claim 14, wherein the said flat stone and the said barrier stone may be a single-piece unit or two separate pieces joined together.

16. The edge stones as described in claim 15, wherein, as separate pieces to be joined together, the said flat stones are laid horizontally on one side or both sides of the road with their top surface flush with the pavement surface while the barrier stones are set perpendicularly to and tightly against the flat stones with their top surface higher than the pavement; the green belt lies on the outer side of the barrier stones; the surface elevation [e] of the green belt is lower than the bottom edge of the exit opening of the drainage hole in each of the said barrier stones so that there is an elevation drop.

17. The edge stones as described in claim 15, wherein, when the flat stones and the barrier stones form single-piece units, the edge stones may be directly laid on one side or both sides of the road; the top surface of the barrier stones is higher than the pavement surface and the top surface of the flat stones is flush with the pavement surface; the green belt lies on the outer side of the barrier stones; the surface elevation [e] of the green belt is lower than the bottom edge of the exit opening of the drainage hole in each of the said barrier stones so that there is an elevation drop.

18. The border stones used in a third type of irrigation and drainage structure, which border stones consist of flat stones and barrier stones having the following features: This structure also includes supplemental barrier stones; each of the flat stones has a stopper at either end and a trough in the middle section near one side; the trough is connected with the multiple drainage holes in the barrier stones; the top surface of the barrier stones is higher than the supplemental barrier stones, whose top surface is higher than the top surface of the flat stones; the top surface of the flat stones is flush with the upper edge of the trough and higher than the drainage holes in the barrier stones; the barrier stones and the supplemental barrier stones form an overflow relief trough between themselves.

19. The border stones as described in claim 18, wherein the flat stone, the barrier stone and the supplemental barrier stone may form a ".vertline._.vertline."-shaped structure.

20. The border stones as described in claim 18, wherein the said flat stone and the said supplemental barrier stone may be a single-piece "L"-shaped structure, which may then join the barrier stone to form a ".vertline._.vertline."-shaped structure.

21. The border stones as described in claim 18, wherein the said flat stone, barrier stone, and supplemental barrier stone may be a single-piece unit or three separate pieces joined together.

22. The border stones as described in claim 18, wherein the said supplemental barrier stones may have overflow outlets and overflow pipelines connected to those overflow outlets; they constitute the border stones used in a fourth type of drainage and irrigation structure.

23. The border stones as described in claim 18, wherein, in actual application, the said border stones are laid on one side of a green belt, which lies beyond the barrier stones; the surface elevation [e] of the green belt is lower than the bottom edge of the exit opening of the drainage hole in each of the said barrier stones so that there is an elevation drop; the rainwater flows into the trough in the flat stones and then through the drainage holes in the barrier stones onto the green belt; the supplemental barrier stones prevent the rainwater from flowing randomly.

24. The border stones as described in claim 22, wherein, in actual application, the border stones, consisting of the said flat stones, the said barrier stones and the said supplemental barrier stones, may be laid on one side of a sloping planted area, which lies outside the barrier stones; the surface elevation [e] of the planted area is lower than the bottom edge of the drainage hole in each of the said barrier stones so that there is an elevation drop; the water in the planted area flows through the drainage holes in the barrier stones into the overflow outlets in the supplemental barrier stones, and then through the connected overflow pipelines into drainage pipelines.

25. The boundary stones used in a fifth type of drainage and irrigation structure, wherein the boundary stones are U-shaped tubular structures; the tubular wall on one side has multiple drainage holes, which are connected with the water trough in the stones; the tubular stones have internal stoppers on both sides, or have no stopper.

26. The boundary stones as described in claim 25, wherein the drainage holes on the tubular wall are positioned lower than the top of the stoppers, which is a level surface and functions as the drainage initiation point.

27. The boundary stones as described in claim 25, wherein, in actual application, the U-shaped tubular boundary stones may be laid on one side of a planted area with the drainage holes on their walls opening towards the planted area; excessive rainwater in the planted area may flow through the drainage holes into the trough in the tubular boundary stones, which function like a dike to hold water around the tiered fields on the hill slopes; the boundary stones may also be used together with the border stones discussed earlier on barren hill slopes.

28. The curb stones as described in claim 6, wherein, in actual application, the said curb barrier stones may be set perpendicularly along one side of the road foundation with their rainwater ports below the top surface of the foundation; the top surface of the curb barrier stones is higher than the pavement surface; another row of curb barrier stones and flat curb stones is laid on the other side of the road; outside the curb barrier stones are planted areas; the rainwater ports in the curb barrier stones on both sides of the road are connected to underground drainage pipelines, which in turn lead into municipal sewage pipelines.

29. The drainage and irrigation structures as described in one of claims 6, 12, 18, and 25 wherein, depending on the conditions of the planted areas and the types of terrain, the said curb stones, edge stones, border stones and boundary stones may be set at one side of the planted areas, on one side or both sides of the roads, or at appropriate locations on barren hills; they may be connected to underground pipelines which lead to main drainage pipes, which in turn may be connected to drainage ditches.
Description



TECHNICAL AREA

[0001] This Invention relates to a drainage and irrigation approach and structure as well as its implementation. In particular, it relates to a drainage and irrigation approach and structure as well as its implementation in connection with roads, landscaping on top of architectural structures, green belts, planted borders, and barren hill slopes.

BACKGROUND TECHNOLOGY

[0002] Roads, drainage pipeline networks, and landscaping are important urban infrastructures, which have a direct impact on the quality of the urban environment. The conventional road curb generally consists of curb barrier stones and flat curb stones. The flat curb stones are laid horizontally along one side or both sides of the road, with their upper surface flush with the road pavement. The curb barrier stones are laid perpendicularly to and tightly against the flat curb stones along the outer edge of the road, with their upper surface higher than the road pavement. To facilitate the drainage of rainwater, a curb barrier stone with a rainwater port is placed at a certain interval (generally 30-50 meters) along the road, or a special grated rainwater port is placed in its place. The said rainwater port is connected through a pipe to an underground drainage pipeline.

[0003] To improve the rainwater drainage speed and efficiency, rainwater ports should be placed at the lowest positions on the road. Therefore, when necessary, longitudinal slopes are built on the road, that is, the pavement is laid with a specific sloping grade in the longitudinal direction of the road. Then, rainwater ports or special rainwater drainage devices are placed at the lowest positions on the pavement slopes.

[0004] As is disclosed in a Japanese patent document (Publication No. 6-248610) and shown in FIG. 15, a row of curb barrier stones are laid on either side of the seeded median strip of the road pavement. Each of the curb barrier stones has two evenly embedded pre-fabricated blocks, which are water pervious. The curb barrier stones are laid in such a manner that the bottoms of the pre-fabricated pervious blocks are flush with the surface of the pavement. In the event of a rainfall or road cleaning, the rainwater or the cleaning water is allowed to flow through the pores in the pre-fabricated pervious blocks into the soil in the seeded median strip (in the direction indicated by the arrow in FIG. 15) for irrigation purposes. Sands and other debris carried by the water are stopped and stranded between the curb barrier stones and the pavement. Consequently, regular maintenance work such as removing the debris is necessitated. Such maintenance work requires a lot of labor and expenses.

[0005] Also, as is disclosed in a German patent document (DE 295 08 680 U1) and shown in FIG. 4, a row of curb barrier stones are laid on either side of the sloping road pavement. A drainage outlet is formed between each pair of adjacent curb barrier stones. On the outer side of either row of the curb barrier stones are green barrier slopes or seeded areas. In the event of a rainfall or road cleaning, the rainwater or the cleaning water flows down the sloping pavement and through the drainage outlets in the curb barrier stones directly into the green barrier slopes or seeded areas for irrigation purposes. In a heavy rainfall, the vegetation may easily be damaged, the soil be washed away, and the water resources be wasted.

[0006] Again, as is disclosed in a French patent document (N.degree. 1.368.655) and shown in FIG. 5, a row of curb barrier stones with pre-installed slanting pipe joints is laid along either side of the road. The pipe joints are connected to an underground pipeline. The cross section of the curb barrier stones assumes an "L" shape. The curb barrier stones are laid in such a manner that their top surface is even with the pavement surface. The bottom part of the curb barrier stone tilts upward and slants inward. The lower part of the opening of the pre-installed pipe joint is flush with the inner edge of the tilting section of the bottom part of the curb barrier stone. In the event of a rainfall or road cleaning, the rainwater or cleaning water flows through the opening of the pipe joint directly into the underground sewage pipeline. Sludge and other debris carried by the water may contaminate and clog the pipes. Debris removal will require a lot of labor and expenses. In addition, the water resources are wasted.

[0007] The conventional technology as evidenced in the examples presented in the previous paragraphs has created a lot of problems in road debris removing, which has been costly and labor intensive. Road maintenance often generates a lot of dust, thus continually causing pollution. In addition, rainfalls or irrigation of the green belts and seeded strips along the roads cause soil loss, underground pipe clogging and contaminating, and contamination of downstream water resources. In short, in the event of rainfalls, the existing curb structures cause debris to be washed from green belts and surfaces of structures to the road pavements and then to underground pipelines and rivers and lakes. We are confronted not only with the issue of soil and water loss, but also with the risk of on-going contamination.

SCOPE OF THE INVENTION

[0008] The purpose of this Invention is to provide a drainage and irrigation approach and structure, which, in the event of rainfalls and road cleaning, may function simultaneously in two ways: retaining dirt and debris in the green belts and seeded strips to avoid drainage pipeline blockage, downstream water body contamination, and soil loss on the one hand, and properly allocating water consumption and making better use of external water resources in the green belts and seeded strips to improve the environmental conditions on the roads and green belts as well as seeded strips, promote the water and soil conservation in the green belts and planting area, and cultivate the natural conditions for plant growth.

[0009] Another purpose of this Invention is to provide a drainage and irrigation approach and structure, which may offer curb stones of various structural forms to suit the infrastructural needs of hard soil drainage, roadway drainage, as well as preservation of landscaping on top of architectural structures, green belts, seeded strips, planted plots and barren hills.

[0010] The technical solution of this Invention involves a drainage and irrigation approach suitable for both rainwater and road cleaning water. The said approach consists of two stages: the initial stage of irrigating green belts and the later stage of rainwater drainage. In the initial irrigation stage rainwater, at the beginning of a rainfall or foul water in the event of road cleaning with debris flows through drainage holes in the drainage and irrigation structure into the planted areas, thereby providing the nutrients and water necessary for plant growth. If the rain continues falling and the rainwater rises to a certain level, clear water flows through rainwater ports in the drainage and irrigation structure into the underground pipes and corresponding connected pipelines. The clear rainwater is then stored in underground reservoirs for storage or flows into rivers and lakes. From there it evaporates into the ecological cycle of nature.

[0011] The said drainage and irrigation approach has the following engineering requirements: The drainage initiation point of the pavement is at Elevation b, the drainage initiation point of the rainwater port is at Elevation a, the drainage or irrigation initiation point of the curb is at Elevation C, the blocking point of the floating debris in the green belt is at Elevation d, and the water accumulation initiation point in the green belt and the seeded strips is at Elevation e, where the said point b is higher than point C and point d, which in turn is higher than point e.

[0012] This Invention relates to the curb stones used in a type of irrigation and drainage structure, which curb stones consist of flat curb stones and curb barrier stones having the following features: Each of the said flat curb stones has a longitudinal drainage trough in its top surface and each of the said curb barrier stones has a half-circular cut-out at either end so that a drainage hole is formed when two curb barrier stones are laid end-to-end. The said longitudinal trough on the flat curb stones and the said drainage holes on the curb barrier stones are interconnected to form an unobstructed channel for water flows.

[0013] The said curb barrier stones have rainwater ports installed at a certain interval and the rainwater ports are connected to underground pipelines. The highest point of the drainage hole in each curb barrier stone is lower than the bottom edge of the said rainwater port.

[0014] The half-circular cut-out in the curb barrier stone may be a horizontal or a slanting trough. In other words, its entry and its exit may be at the same elevation or may have a proper elevation drop.

[0015] This Invention relates to the edge stones used in a second type of irrigation and drainage structure, which edge stones consist of flat stones and barrier stones having the following features: Each of the said flat stones has a longitudinal trough on the side of its top surface close to the barrier stones, and the longitudinal trough connects with a drainage hole at either end of each barrier stone and several evenly spaced drainage holes in the middle section of the barrier stone to form an unobstructed channel for water flows.

[0016] The said flat stone and the said barrier stone may form an "L"-shaped or "--.vertline."-shaped structure.

[0017] The said flat stone and the said barrier stone may be a single-piece unit or two separate pieces joined together.

[0018] As separate pieces to be joined together, the said flat stones are laid horizontally on one side or both sides of the road with their top surface flush with the pavement surface while the barrier stones are set perpendicularly to and tightly against the flat stones with their top surface higher than the pavement. The green belt [A] lies on the outer side of the barrier stones. The surface elevation [e] of the green belt is lower than the bottom edge of the exit opening of the drainage hole in each of the said barrier stones so that there is an elevation drop.

[0019] This Invention relates to the border stones used in a third type of irrigation and drainage structure, which border stones consist of flat stones and barrier stones having the following features: This structure also includes supplemental barrier stones. Each of the flat stones has a stopper at either end and a trough in the middle section near one side. The trough is connected with the multiple drainage holes in the barrier stones. The top surface of the barrier stones is higher than the supplemental barrier stones, whose top surface is higher than the top surface of the flat stones. The top surface of the flat stones is flush with the upper edge of the trough and higher than the drainage holes in the barrier stones. The barrier stones and the supplemental barrier stones form an overflow relief trough between themselves.

[0020] The flat stone, the barrier stone and the supplemental barrier stone may form a ".vertline._.vertline."-shaped structure.

[0021] The said flat stone and the said supplemental barrier stone may be a single-piece "L"-shaped structure, which may then join the barrier stone to form a ".vertline._.vertline."-shaped structure.

[0022] The said flat stone, barrier stone, and supplemental barrier stone may be a single-piece unit or three separate pieces joined together.

[0023] The said supplemental barrier stones may have overflow outlets and overflow pipelines connected to those overflow outlets. They constitute the border stones used in a fourth type of drainage and irrigation structure.

[0024] This Invention also relates to the boundary stones used in a fifth type of drainage and irrigation structure, wherein the boundary stones are U-shaped tubular structures. The tubular wall on one side has multiple drainage holes, which are connected with the water trough in the stones. The tubular stones may or may not have internal stoppers on both sides.

[0025] The said curb barrier stones may be set perpendicularly along one side of the road foundation with their rainwater ports below the top surface of the foundation. The top surface of the curb barrier stones is higher than the pavement surface. Another row of curb barrier stones and flat curb stones is laid on the other side of the road. Outside the curb barrier stones are planted areas. The rainwater ports in the curb barrier stones on both sides of the road are connected to underground drainage pipelines respectively, which in turn lead into municipal sewage pipes.

[0026] Depending on the conditions of the areas and the types of terrain, the said curb stones, edge stones, border stones and boundary stones may be set at one side of the planted areas, on one side or both sides of the roads, or at appropriate locations on barren hills. They may be connected to underground pipelines which lead to main drainage pipes, which in turn may be connected to drainage ditches.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0027] FIG. 1 is an operation flow chart of this Invention.

[0028] FIG. 2 is a structural diagram of the curb stones used in Application Sample 1 of this Invention.

[0029] FIG. 3 is a diagram of the operational principles in the initial green belt irrigation stage in Application Sample 1 of this Invention.

[0030] FIG. 4 is a diagram of the operational principles in the later drainage stage in Application Sample 1 of this Invention.

[0031] FIG. 5 is an engineering diagram of the curb drainage structure in Application Sample 1 of this Invention.

[0032] FIG. 6 is a structural diagram of the edge stones used in Application Sample 2 of this Invention.

[0033] FIG. 7 is an operational diagram of Application Sample 2 of this Invention.

[0034] FIG. 8 is a structural diagram of the border stones used in Application Sample 3 of this Invention.

[0035] FIG. 9 is an operational diagram of Application Sample 3 of this invention.

[0036] FIG. 10 is a structural diagram of the border stones used in Application Sample 4 of this Invention.

[0037] FIG. 11 is an operational diagram of Application Sample 4 of this invention.

[0038] FIG. 12 is a structural diagram of the boundary stones used in Application Sample 5 of this Invention.

[0039] FIG. 13 is an operational diagram of Application Sample 6 of this invention.

[0040] FIG. 14 is an operational diagram of Application Sample 7 of this invention.

[0041] FIG. 15 is a structural diagram of the conventional technology (part 1).

[0042] FIG. 16 is a structural diagram of the conventional technology (part 2).

[0043] FIG. 17 is a 3-D diagram of the objects in FIG. 16.

[0044] FIG. 18 is a structural diagram of the conventional technology (part 3).

[0045] FIG. 19 is a top view of the objects in FIG. 18.

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE INVENTION

[0046] The application samples presented in the following paragraphs are intended to illustrate in detail the implementation and benefits of this Invention so that readers may see the creativity embodied in this Invention. The samples should be studied together with the drawings.

[0047] See FIG. 1, which is an operation flow chart of this Invention. This Invention involves a drainage and irrigation approach suitable for both rainwater and road cleaning water. The said approach consists of two stages: the initial stage of irrigating green belts and seeded strips and the later stage of rainwater drainage. In the initial irrigation stage, rainwater at the beginning of a rainfall or foul water in the event of road cleaning with debris flow through drainage holes in the drainage and irrigation structure onto the planted areas, thereby providing the nutrients and water necessary for plant growth. If the rain continues falling and the rainwater rises to a certain level, it flows through the rainwater ports in the drainage and irrigation structure into the underground pipes and connected pipelines. The clear rainwater is then stored in underground reservoirs for storage or flows into rivers and lakes. From there it evaporates into the ecological cycle of nature. The concept of this Invention is as follows: At the beginning of a rainfall or in the event of road cleaning, the water with debris flows through drainage holes in the drainage and irrigation structure onto the planted areas, thereby providing the nutrients and water necessary for plant growth. If the rain continues falling and the rainwater rises to a certain level, it flows through the rainwater ports in the drainage and irrigation structure into the underground pipes and connected pipelines. The clear rainwater is then stored in underground reservoirs for storage or flows into rivers and lakes. From there it evaporates into the ecological cycle of nature.

[0048] Application Sample 1

[0049] See FIG. 2, which shows the curb stones used in a type of irrigation and drainage structure. The curb stones consist of flat curb stones [1] and curb barrier stones [2]. Each of the said flat curb stones [1] has a longitudinal drainage trough [3] in its top surface and each of the said curb barrier stones [2] has a half-circular cut-out at either end so that a drainage hole [4] is formed when two curb barrier stones [2] are laid end-to-end. The said longitudinal trough [3] on the flat curb stones and the said drainage holes [4] on the curb barrier stones are interconnected to form an unobstructed channel for water flows.

[0050] The said curb barrier stones [2] have rainwater ports [6] installed at a certain interval and connected to underground pipelines [8]. The rainwater port [6], assuming a "" shape, can prevent the dirty water in the green belts [A] from entering into the rainwater ports [6]. The highest point of the drainage hole [4] on the curb barrier stone is lower than the bottom edge of the said rainwater port [6].

[0051] The said longitudinal trough stretches on the top surface of the said flat curb stone [1] and along the upper edge close to the said curb barrier stone [2]. It is a trough cut along the said upper edge of the flat curb stone [1].

[0052] The said drainage hole [4] on the curb barrier stone [2] goes through either end of the curb barrier stone. Its opening at the flat curb stone [2] side is the water entry and on the outer side of the curb barrier stone [2] is the water exit. The bottom edge of the entry opening is flush with the bottom of the longitudinal trough [3] on the flat curb stone. The exit opening is somewhat lower than the entry opening to produce a horizontal elevation drop. However, the entry opening and the exit opening may be set level.

[0053] The said longitudinal trough [3] is a half-circular trough cut along the edge of the flat curb stone [1] close to the said curb barrier stone [2]. Additional cut-outs may or may not be made at proper positions along the trough in correspondence to the drainage holes [4] on the curb barrier stones (cut-outs not shown in the drawing).

[0054] The half-circular drainage hole cut-out in the curb barrier stone may be a horizontal or a slanting trough. In other words, its entry and its exit may be at the same elevation or may have a proper elevation drop.

[0055] In view of the structural features of the said curb stones, the relevant drainage and irrigation approach is as follows (see FIGS. 3-4):

[0056] 1. For the initial green belt irrigation stage, flat curb stones [1] are laid horizontally along one side or both sides of the road, their top surface flush with the pavement surface [7]. The curb barrier stones [2] are laid perpendicularly to and tightly against the flat curb stones [1] along the outer edge of the road, their bottom part set in a holding frame [21] and their top surface higher than the road pavement. On either side of the road, there is a green belt [A] on the outer side of the curb barrier stones [2]. The surface elevation [e] of the green belt is lower than the bottom edge of the exit opening of the drainage hole [4] in each of the said curb barrier stones so that there is an elevation drop. At the beginning of a rainfall, the rainwater [9] flows along a drainage channel consisting of a trough [3] in each flat curb stone and a drainage hole [4] in each curb barrier stone. It then flows through the exit opening of the drainage hole [4] onto the green belt [A].

[0057] 2. For the later drainage stage, a rainwater port [6] is installed at a certain interval in the row of curb barrier stones. The rainwater ports [6] are connected to the underground drainage pipeline [8]. The highest position of the said drainage hole [4] in each curb barrier stone should be lower than the bottom edge [b] of the said rainwater port [6]. When the rainwater accumulates in the green belt [A] and the water level rises to a point [a] above the rainwater port, it flows through the outlet into the underground pipeline [8]. The rainwater port [6] in each curb barrier stone can also effectively prevent floating debris in the green belt from entering the rainwater port [6] so that the water flowing into the outlet is virtually filtered, thus avoiding clogging of underground pipelines [8] and rivers as well as reducing the maintenance work and labor required to remove the blockage.

[0058] The said drainage and irrigation approach has the following engineering requirements (see FIG. 5): The drainage initiation point of the pavement is at Elevation b, the drainage initiation point of the rainwater port is at Elevation a, the drainage or irrigation initiation point of the curb is at Elevation C, the blocking point of the floating debris in the green belt is at Elevation d, and the water accumulation initiation point in the green belt and the seeded strips is at Elevation e, where the elevations of point a and point b shall be calculated on the basis of the pavement width and grade while the elevations of other points should also be properly set depending on the environmental conditions.

[0059] The elevation between b and C is 6 cm; the elevation between b and d is about 12 cm; and the elevation between d and e is about 5 cm.

[0060] Application Sample 2

[0061] See FIGS. 6-7, which show the edge stones used in a second type of irrigation and drainage structure. The edge stones consist of flat stones [10] and barrier stones [20]. Each of the said flat stones [10] has a longitudinal trough [30] on the side of its top surface close to the barrier stones [20], and the longitudinal trough connects with a drainage hole [40] at either end of the barrier stone and several evenly spaced drainage holes [40] in the middle section of the barrier stone to form an unobstructed channel for water flows.

[0062] The bottom edge of the multiple holes [40] in the said barrier stone [20] is flush with the bottom of the longitudinal trough [30] in the flat stone. The drainage hole [40] at either end of the barrier stone [20] is flush with and connects to the bottom of the longitudinal trough [30]. The hole is a half-circular trough at the end of each barrier stone. When two barrier stones are set end-to-end, a circular drainage hole [40] is formed.

[0063] The said flat stone [20] and the said barrier stone [30] may form an "L"-shaped or "--.vertline."-shaped structure.

[0064] The said flat stone [20] and the said barrier stone [30] may be a single-piece unit or two separate pieces joined together.

[0065] See FIG. 7. When the flat stone 20 and the barrier stone 30 are as separate pieces to be joined together, the said flat stones [20] are laid horizontally on one side or both sides of the road with their top surface flush with the pavement surface [7] while the barrier stones [30] are set perpendicularly to and tightly against the flat stones [20] with their top surface higher than the pavement. The green belt [A] lies on the outer side of the barrier stones [20]. The surface elevation [e] of the green belt is lower than the bottom edge of the exit opening of the drainage hole [40] in each of the said barrier stones so that there is an elevation drop.

[0066] When the flat stones and the barrier stones form single-piece units, the edge stones may be directly laid on one side or both sides of the road. The top surface of the barrier stones [20] is higher than the pavement surface [7] and the top surface of the flat stones [10] is flush with the pavement surface. The green belt [A] lies on the outer side of the barrier stones [20]. The surface elevation [e] of the green belt is lower than the bottom edge of the exit opening of the drainage hole [40] in each of the said barrier stones so that there is an elevation drop.

[0067] Application Sample 3

[0068] See FIGS. 8-9, which show the border stones used in a third type of irrigation and drainage structure. The border stones consist of flat stones [10], barrier stones [20] and supplemental barrier stones [20']. Each of the flat stones [10] has a stopper at either end and a trough [30'] in the middle section near one side. The trough [30'] is connected with the multiple drainage holes [40] in the barrier stones. The top surface of the barrier stones [20] is higher than the supplemental barrier stones [20'], whose top surface is higher than the top surface of the flat stones [10]. The top surface of the flat stones is flush with the upper edge of the trough [30'] and higher than the drainage holes [40] in the barrier stones [20]. The barrier stones [20] and the supplemental barrier stones [20'] form an overflow relief trough [12] between themselves.

[0069] The flat stone [10], the barrier stone [20] and the supplemental barrier stone [20'] may form a ".vertline._.vertline."-shaped structure.

[0070] The said flat stone [10] and the said supplemental barrier stone [20'] may be a single-piece "L"-shaped structure, which may then join the barrier stone [20] to form a ".vertline._.vertline."-shaped structure.

[0071] The said flat stone [10], barrier stone [20], and supplemental barrier stone [20'] may be a single-piece unit or three separate pieces joined together.

[0072] See FIG. 9. In actual application, the said border stones are laid on one side of a green belt [A], which lies beyond the barrier stones [20]. The surface elevation [e] of the green belt is lower than the bottom edge of the exit opening of the drainage hole [40] in each of the said barrier stones so that there is an elevation drop. The rainwater flows into the trough [30'] in the flat stones and then through the drainage holes [40] in the barrier stones onto the green belt. The supplemental barrier stones [20'] prevent the rainwater from flowing randomly.

[0073] Application Sample 4

[0074] See FIG. 10, which shows the border stones used in a fourth type of drainage and irrigation structure. The said structure is essentially identical to that in Application Sample 3 except that the said supplemental barrier stones [20'] may have overflow outlets [23] and overflow pipelines [24] connected to those overflow outlets.

[0075] See FIG. 11. The border stones, consisting of the said flat stones [10], the said barrier stones [20] and the said supplemental barrier stones [20'], may be laid on one side of a sloping planted area, which lies inside the barrier stones [20]. The surface elevation [e] of the planted area is lower than the bottom edge of the drainage hole [40] in each of the said barrier stones so that there is an elevation drop. The water in the planted area flows through the drainage holes [40] in the barrier stones into the overflow outlets [23] in the supplemental barrier stones [20'], and then through the connected overflow pipelines [24] onto the lower tiers of fields.

[0076] Application Sample 5

[0077] See FIG. 12, which shows the boundary stones used in a fifth type of drainage and irrigation structure. The boundary stones [50] are U-shaped tubular structures. The tubular wall on one side has multiple drainage holes [51], which are connected with the water trough [52] in the stones. The tubular stones have internal stoppers [53] on both sides, but there are no stoppers between adjacent boundary stones. The water trough goes all the way through all the joined boundary stones.

[0078] The drainage holes [51] on the tubular wall are positioned higher than the top of the stoppers [53]. The stopper top is a level surface and functions as the drainage initiation point [a].

[0079] See FIG. 11. In actual application, the U-shaped tubular boundary stones may be laid on one side of a planted area with the drainage holes [51] on their walls opening towards the planted area. Excessive rainwater or water from other sources may flow through the drainage holes [51] into the trough [52] in the tubular boundary stones, which function like a dike to hold water around the tiered fields on the hill slopes. The boundary stones [50] may also be used together with the border stones discussed in previous application samples.

[0080] In addition to the applications discussed so far, this Invention may serve the following purposes:

[0081] Application Sample 6

[0082] See FIGS. 13, 3 and 4. The said curb barrier stones [2] may be set perpendicularly along one side of the road foundation [19] with their rainwater ports [6] below the top surface of the foundation [19]. The top surface of the curb barrier stones [2] is higher than the pavement surface [7]. Another row of curb barrier stones [2] and flat curb stones [1] is laid on the other side of the road. Outside the curb barrier stones [2] are planted areas [A]. The rainwater ports [6] in the curb barrier stones [2] on both sides of the road are connected to underground drainage pipelines [8], which in turn lead into municipal sewage pipes [14].

[0083] Application Sample 7

[0084] See FIG. 14. Depending on the conditions of the planted areas [A] and the types of terrain, the said curb stones, edge stones, border stones and boundary stones used in the drainage and irrigation structures of this Invention may be set at one side of the planted areas [A], on one side or both sides of the roads, or at appropriate locations on barren hills. They may be connected through individual pipes to main drainage pipes [15], which in turn may be connected to drainage ditches [16]. This approach makes full use of the water resources, improves drainage efficiency, eliminates the need to have sloping grades in the road pavement, enhances the utilization of water resources, creates better environmental conditions for plant growth, and prevents soil loss.

[0085] This Invention has the following benefits:

[0086] 1. Environmental Protection: Separate channels are designed for dirty water to flow into green belts and clear water to flow into underground pipelines. The dirty water carries a lot of organic matter, which is nutritious to the soil and helpful to plant growth. With only clear water flowing into underground pipelines, the amount of work required in removing sewage slurry and reducing waterway contamination is greatly reduced.

[0087] 2. Improvement of Drainage Efficiency: The possibility of pavement flooding is eliminated. There is no need to build longitudinal grades into the pavement. Drainage troughs may be used to replace pavement grades, thus reducing the cost.

[0088] 3. Improvement of Road Cleaning Efficiency: Washing the pavement is much faster and produces a cleaner result than sweeping it. In addition, there is much less dust contamination. The road cleaning water flows into green belts. Thus, two purposes are served simultaneously: The pavement gets cleaned and the green belts get the water they need.

[0089] 4. Enhanced Utilization of Natural Resources: In the event of a rainfall, as long as there is water on the pavement, the green belts are likely to get the water. Thus, the rainwater is effectively utilized. Any excessive amount of water may be stored for future use.

[0090] 5. Prevention of Soil Loss: As the pavement is higher than the planted areas, the possibility of any debris being washed onto the pavement is eliminated, thus reducing the risk of consecutive contamination. An appropriate water accumulation level may be set in tiered fields on hill slopes so that any excessive water may be drained through pipes or ditches, thus preventing any soil loss or mud streams.

[0091] The application samples presented in the foregoing paragraphs have illustrated the benefits of this Invention. However, those samples are not intended to limit the applications of this Invention. Instead, anyone familiar with the technology embodied in this Invention is encouraged to come up with new designs and modifications that conform to the principles of this Invention and are within the technical area of this Invention. The inventor of this Invention requests that any such designs be included in the claims of this Invention.

* * * * *

File A Patent Application

  • Protect your idea -- Don't let someone else file first. Learn more.

  • 3 Easy Steps -- Complete Form, application Review, and File. See our process.

  • Attorney Review -- Have your application reviewed by a Patent Attorney. See what's included.