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United States Patent Application 20110233867
Kind Code A1
Irwin; Norman Francis September 29, 2011

Telephone texting word game

Abstract

The present invention relates to a word game utilizing playing pieces designed to represent the keys of a telephone. The object of the game is to form words from these playing pieces. The present invention is different from other word games, in that the players can use all the playing pieces associated with the game and all the playing pieces are face-up. When playing previous word games, a player could only use the playing pieces dealt them or picked blindly from a box. The remaining playing pieces in the game remained hidden. This limited choice of letters in other games could be frustrating to a player. The present invention solves this dilemma, by allowing the players to use all the playing pieces and further, all the playing pieces are placed face-up for all the players to see and use when playing the game.


Inventors: Irwin; Norman Francis; (Kitchener, CA)
Serial No.: 662013
Series Code: 12
Filed: March 29, 2010

Current U.S. Class: 273/299
Class at Publication: 273/299
International Class: A63F 1/00 20060101 A63F001/00


Claims



1. I claim a plurality of playing pieces which are constructed from suitable material(s) and having any number of sides or having equal sides or having short sides and opposing long sides and being of any suitable dimension, and all or any facsimiles thereof. The said plurality of playing pieces being comprised of a number of equivalent series of nine sequentially marked playing pieces which can be depicted as playing cards as shown in (FIG. 12), 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, or as tiles or tablets as shown in (FIG. 18), 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119 and more specifically, that each of the nine sequentially marked playing pieces is marked with a numerical indicia and an alphabet indicia with said numerical indicia and said alphabet indicia comprising individual designators as shown at (FIG. 2) 1, 2, 3, 4, (FIG. 3) 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, (FIG. 4) 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, (FIG. 5) 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, (FIG. 6) 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, (FIG. 7) 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, (FIG. 8) 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, (FIG. 9) 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62 (FIG. 10) 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72. The individual numeric indicia being the sequentially numbered digits `1` shown at 1 and again at 4, `2` shown at 5 and again at 9, `3` shown at 13 and again at 17, `4` shown at 21 and again at 25, `5` shown at 29 and again at again 33, 6 shown at 37 and again at 41, `7` shown at 45 and again at 50, `8` shown at 55, and again at 59 and `9` shown at 63 and again at 68 forming the numerical part of the said designator and `ANY LETTER` (FIG. 2) shown at 2 and again at 3, `ABC` (FIG. 3) shown at 6, 7, 8 and again at 10, 11, 12, `DEF` (FIG. 4) shown at 14, 15, 16 and again at 18, 19, 20, `GHI` (FIG. 5) shown at 22, 23, 24 and again at 26, 27, 28, `JKL` (FIG. 6) shown at 30, 31, 32 and again at 34, 35, 36, `MNO` (FIG. 7) shown at 38, 39, 40 and again at 42, 43, 44, `PQRS` (FIG. 8) shown at 46, 47, 48, 49 and again at 51, 52, 53, 54, `TUV` (FIG. 9) shown at 56, 57, 58 and again at 60, 61, 62, `WXYZ` (FIG. 10) shown at 64, 65, 66, 67 and again at 69, 70, 71, 72, being the sequential letters forming the alphabet indicia of the said designators. The nine playing pieces being marked sequentially with a combination of designators and the playing pieces being essentially square or rectangle in shape, having either equal or having two short sides and two opposing long sides.

2. I claim a plurality of playing pieces, and all facsimiles thereof, as in claim 1, wherein each playing piece (FIG. 12) 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, and 86 has a specific designator which consists first of a numeric indicia and further that the designator also consists of a alphabet indicia and that the said numeric indicia is not of any specific size and that said alphabet indicia are not of any specific size and that the relationship as to the size of the numeric indicia as it relates to the size of the alphabet indicia making up said designator is of no specific ratio and the relationship between the numeric indicia and the alphabet indicia making up the designator is such that the two may be in any position as to their placement next to and in proximity to each other.

3. I claim a playing piece in a series of nine sequentially designated playing pieces, and all facsimiles thereof, comprising a playing piece FIG. 2 having any number of sides or having equal sides or having short sides and opposing long sides as in claim 1, wherein a first designator consists of a numeric indicia and more specifically the digit `1` shown at 1 and further the first designator also consists of the alphabet indicia `ANY LETTER` shown at 2. The numeric indicia `1` shown at 1 is of no particular size ratio in relation to the alphabet indicia `ANY LETTER` shown at 2 and the placement of the numeric indicia 1 and the alphabet indicia 2 is such that the two may be in any position as to their placement next to and in proximity to each other. A second designator which is rotated at a one hundred and eighty degree angle to the first designator and consisting of a numeric indicia and more specifically the digit `1` shown at 4 and further a second designator is also comprised of an alphabet indicia `ANY LETTER` shown at 3. The numeric indicia `1` shown at 4 is not of any particular ratio in relation to the alphabet indicia `ANY LETTER` shown at 3 and the relationship between the numeric indicia 4 and the alphabet indicia 3 is such that the two may be in any position as to their placement next to or in proximity to each other. This card may be commonly referred as the `wild card`.

4. I claim a playing piece in a series of nine sequentially designated playing pieces, and all facsimiles thereof, comprising a playing piece FIG. 3 having any number of sides or having equal sides or having short sides and opposing long sides as in claim 1 wherein a first designator consists of a numeric indicia and more specifically the digit `2` shown at 5, further the designator is also comprised of an alphabet indicia `ABC` shown at 6, 7, 8. The numeric indicia `2` shown at 5 is not of any particular ratio in relation to the alphabet indicia `ABC` shown at 6, 7, 8 and the relationship between the numeric indicia shown at 5 and the alphabet indicia shown at 6, 7, 8 is such that the two may be in any position as to their placement next to and in proximity to each other. A second designator which is rotated at a one hundred and eighty degree angle to the first designator and consisting of a numeric indicia and more specifically the digit `2` shown at 9 and further a second designator is also comprised of an alphabet indicia `ABC` shown at 10, 11, 12. The numeric indicia `2` shown at 9 is not of any particular ratio in relation to the alphabet indicia `ABC` shown at 10, 11, 12 and the relationship between the numeric indicia shown at 9 and the alphabet indicia shown at 10, 11, 12 is such that the two may be in any position as to their placement next to or in proximity to each other.

5. I claim a playing piece in a series of nine sequentially designated playing pieces, and all facsimiles thereof, comprising a playing piece FIG. 4 having any number of sides or having equal sides or having short sides and opposing long sides as in claim 1 wherein a first designator consists of a numeric indicia and more specifically the digit `3` shown at 13, further the designator is also comprised of an alphabet indicia `DEF` shown at 14, 15, 16. The numeric indicia `3` shown at 13 is not of any particular ratio in relation to the alphabet indicia `DEF` shown at 14, 15, 16 and the relationship between the numeric indicia shown at 13 and the alphabet indicia shown at 14, 15, 16 is such that the two may be in any position as to their placement next to and in proximity to each other. A second designator which is rotated at a one hundred and eighty degree angle to the first designator and consisting of a numeric indicia and more specifically the digit `3` shown at 17 and further a second designator is also comprised of an alphabet indicia `DEF` shown at 18, 19, 20. The numeric indicia `3` shown at 17 is not of any particular ratio in relation to the alphabet indicia `DEF` shown at 18, 19, 20 and the relationship between the numeric indicia shown at 17 and the alphabet indicia shown at 18, 19, 20 is such that the two may be in any position as to their placement next to or in proximity to each other.

6. I claim a playing piece in a series of nine sequentially designated playing pieces, and all facsimiles thereof, comprising a playing piece FIG. 5 having any number of sides or having equal sides or having short sides and opposing long sides as in claim 1 wherein a first designator consists of a numeric indicia and more specifically the digit `4` shown at 21, further the designator is also comprised of an alphabet indicia `GHI` shown at 22, 23, 24. The numeric indicia `4` shown at 21 is not of any particular ratio in relation to the alphabet indicia `GHI` shown at 22, 23, 24 and the relationship between the numeric indicia shown at 21 and the alphabet indicia shown at 22, 23, 24 is such that the two may be in any position as to their placement next to and in proximity to each other. A second designator which is rotated at a one hundred and eighty degree angle to the first designator and consisting of a numeric indicia and more specifically the digit `4` shown at 25 and further a second designator is also comprised of an alphabet indicia `GHI` shown at 26, 27, 28. The numeric indicia `4` shown at 25 is not of any particular ratio in relation to the alphabet indicia `GHI` shown at 26, 27, 28 and the relationship between the numeric indicia shown at 25 and the alphabet indicia shown at 26, 27, 28 is such that the two may be in any position as to their placement next to or in proximity to each other.

7. I claim a playing piece in a series of nine sequentially designated playing pieces, and all facsimiles thereof, comprising a playing piece FIG. 6 having any number of sides or having equal sides or having short sides and opposing long sides as in claim 1 wherein a first designator consists of a numeric indicia and more specifically the digit `5` shown at 29, further the designator is also comprised of an alphabet indicia `JKL` shown at 30, 31, 32. The numeric indicia `5` shown at 29 is not of any particular ratio in relation to the alphabet indicia `JKL` shown at 30, 31, 32 and the relationship between the numeric indicia shown at 29 and the alphabet indicia shown at 30, 31, 32 is such that the two may be in any position as to their placement next to and in proximity to each other. A second designator which is rotated at a one hundred and eighty degree angle to the first designator and consisting of a numeric indicia and more specifically the digit `5` shown at 33 and further a second designator is also comprised of an alphabet indicia `JKL` shown at 34, 35, 36. The numeric indicia `5` shown at 33 is not of any particular ratio in relation to the alphabet indicia `JKL` shown at 34, 35, 36 and the relationship between the numeric indicia shown at 33 and the alphabet indicia shown at 34, 35, 36 is such that the two may be in any position as to their placement next to or in proximity to each other.

8. I claim a playing piece in a series of nine sequentially designated playing pieces, and all facsimiles thereof, comprising a playing piece FIG. 7 having any number of sides or having equal sides or having short sides and opposing long sides as in claim 1 wherein a first designator consists of a numeric indicia and more specifically the digit `6` shown at 37, further the designator is also comprised of an alphabet indicia `MNO` shown at 38, 39, 40. The numeric indicia `6` shown at 37 is not of any particular ratio in relation to the alphabet indicia `MNO` shown at 38, 39, 40 and the relationship between the numeric indicia shown at 37 and the alphabet indicia shown at 38, 39, 40 is such that the two may be in any position as to their placement next to and in proximity to each other. A second designator which is rotated at a one hundred and eighty degree angle to the first designator and consisting of a numeric indicia and more specifically the digit `6` shown at 41 and further a second designator is also comprised of an alphabet indicia `MNO` shown at 42, 43, 44. The numeric indicia `6` shown at 41 is not of any particular ratio in relation to the alphabet indicia `MNO` shown at 42, 43, 44 and the relationship between the numeric indicia shown at 41 and the alphabet indicia shown at 42, 43, 44 is such that the two may be in any position as to their placement next to or in proximity to each other.

9. I claim a playing piece in a series of nine sequentially designated playing pieces, and all facsimiles thereof, comprising a playing piece FIG. 8 having any number of sides or having sides or having short sides and opposing long sides as in claim 1 wherein a first designator consists of a numeric indicia and more specifically the digit `7` shown at 45, further the designator is also comprised of an alphabet indicia `PQRS` shown at 46, 47, 48, 49. The numeric indicia `7` shown at 45 is not of any particular ratio in relation to the alphabet indicia `PQRS` shown at 46, 47, 48, 49 and the relationship between the numeric indicia shown at 45 and the alphabet indicia shown at 46, 47, 48, 49 is such that the two may be in any position as to their placement next to and in proximity to each other. A second designator which is rotated at a one hundred and eighty degree angle to the first designator and consisting of a numeric indicia and more specifically the digit `7` shown at 50 and further a second designator is also comprised of an alphabet indicia `PQRS` shown at 51, 52, 53, 54. The numeric indicia `7` shown at 50 is not of any particular ratio in relation to the alphabet indicia `PQRS` shown at 51, 52, 53, 54 and the relationship between the numeric indicia shown at 50 and the alphabet indicia shown at 51, 52, 53, 54 is such that the two may be in any position as to their placement next to or in proximity to each other.

10. I claim a playing piece in a series of nine sequentially designated playing pieces, and all facsimiles thereof, comprising a playing piece FIG. 9 having any number of sides or having equal sides or having short sides and opposing long sides as in claim 1 wherein a first designator consists of a numeric indicia and more specifically the digit `8` shown at 55, further the designator is also comprised of an alphabet indicia `TUV` shown at 56, 57, 58. The numeric indicia `8` shown at 55 is not of any particular ratio in relation to the alphabet indicia `TUV` shown at 56, 57, 58 and the relationship between the numeric indicia shown at 55 and the alphabet indicia shown at 56, 57, 58 is such that the two may be in any position as to their placement next to and in proximity to each other. A second designator which is rotated at a one hundred and eighty degree angle to the first designator and consisting of a numeric indicia and more specifically the digit `8` shown at 59 and further a second designator is also comprised of an alphabet indicia `TUV` shown at 60, 61, 62. The numeric indicia `8` shown at 59 is not of any particular ratio in relation to the alphabet indicia `TUV` shown at 60, 61, 62 and the relationship between the numeric indicia shown at 59 and the alphabet indicia shown at 60, 61, 62 is such that the two may be in any position as to their placement next to or in proximity to each other.

11. I claim a playing piece in a series of nine sequentially designated playing pieces, and all facsimiles thereof, comprising a playing piece FIG. 10 having any number of sides or having equal sides or having short sides and opposing long sides as in claim 1 wherein a first designator consists of a numeric indicia and more specifically the digit `9` shown at 63, further the designator is also comprised of an alphabet indicia `WXYZ` shown at 64, 65, 66, 67. The numeric indicia `9` shown at 63 is not of any particular ratio in relation to the alphabet indicia `WXYZ` shown at 64, 65, 66, 67 and the relationship between the numeric indicia shown at 63 and the alphabet indicia shown at 64, 65, 66, 67 is such that the two may be in any position as to their placement next to and in proximity to each other. A second designator which is rotated at a one hundred and eighty degree angle to the first designator and consisting of a numeric indicia and more specifically the digit `8` shown at 68 and further a second designator is also comprised of an alphabet indicia `WXYZ` shown at 69, 70, 71, 72. The numeric indicia `9` shown at 68 is not of any particular ratio in relation to the alphabet indicia `WXYZ` shown at 69, 70, 71, 72 and the relationship between the numeric indicia shown at 68 and the alphabet indicia shown at 69, 70, 71, 72 is such that the two may be in any position as to their placement next to or in proximity to each other.

12. I claim a method of play of a word game, wherein the playing pieces as in claim 1, are placed face-up in a grid type pattern (FIG. 15) 93 on a playing surface, and the said grid type pattern means the playing pieces are placed in rows consisting of any number of the said playing pieces and any number of said rows and that the grid type pattern is sufficiently large enough to accommodate all the playing pieces, that are at any given time, part of, supplied with, or used in conjunction with the said game.

13. I claim a method of play, of a word game, as in claim 12, wherein the method of play consist of a player or players constructing a word using as the basis of the said word, the alphabet indicia of the playing pieces as shown in FIG. 12 and as shown in FIG. 18. Further that the said word when constructed may consist of a group of the single letters from the alphabet indicia of any group of single playing pieces meaning, consisting of any group of single letters garnered from any group of single playing piece's alphabet indicia.

14. I claim a method of play, of a word game, as in claim 13, wherein after a player has constructed a word from a particular group of playing pieces said playing pieces, used to construct the said word, are removed from the playing area and retained by the player who constructed the said word for the purpose of counting the numeric indicia on the said playing pieces in order to accumulate a point count.

15. I claim a method of play, of a word game, as in claim 14, wherein the playing piece designated as the `wild card`, which is the playing piece with the numeric indicia `1` and the alphabet indicia `ANY LETTER` as shown in FIG. 2 may be used in place of any letter in any word constructed by a player and may indicate any letter in the alphabet the said player so chooses.

16. I claim a method of play, of a word game, as in claim 15, wherein if the number of playing pieces is such that a player when constructing a word uses all of the remaining playing pieces in the playing area to construct the said word, that player is awarded fifty bonus points when counting the value of the said word that the said player constructed.

17. I claim a method of play, of a word game, as in claim 13, wherein when a player who is attempting to form a correctly spelled word discovers that the word that the said player is attempting to form is a hyphenated word, the hyphen in the said word may be inserted into the spelling of the said word by using one of the playing pieces on which the face of said playing piece shows the designator `1`, ` ANY LETTER` as is shown in (FIG. 2) 1, 2, 3, 4 and described in claim 3. The playing piece in this instance may be used as a hyphen in the said word instead of as a letter.
Description



BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] The present invention relates to a word game and more particularly to a word game utilizing a unique style of play incorporating a plurality of playing pieces. The present invention is unique, in that it allows the players to use all the playing pieces on the table to form words, unlike other games in which the player is simply dealt the playing pieces which they are allowed to use. When playing previous word games, a player uses the playing pieces dealt to them and sometimes an additional few pieces may be given the player, although generally this amounts to less than ten pieces.

[0002] There has always been a defining amount of playing pieces a player has been able to choose from in their quest to form a word in previous word games. During these games the number of playing pieces available to form a word and the length of the word that can be formed from those playing pieces generally has bounds and is totally dependent on the number of playing pieces the player chooses or the number of pieces dealt the player. The ability to form a particular word and the specific playing pieces used to form that word is restricted, making the game limited in scope. The present invention is not limited to the use of only the playing pieces that are dealt to a player or the few pieces in the middle of the table which the player may utilize. The only restriction to the amount of playing pieces a player may use is the number of pieces that come with the game and the number of pieces removed by other players during a round of play of the game.

[0003] As will be seen, the familiarity of the telephone rotary dial and the key pad used by a large segment of the world's telephones provides a unique basis for a word game that comprises the present invention and is unequalled among the word games presently available. The present invention is distinctly different from other word games or word card games in the method of play utilized. This distinction leads to a larger number of choices that are available at any one time to a player in order to form the word during a game.

[0004] The present invention was derived from the content of a newspaper puzzle which was created and subsequently copyrighted by Norman F. Irwin. This newspaper puzzle uses as a basis the individual keys on the telephone keypad and more specifically, the numbers and letters on the telephone keypad as is explained more completely in the following text.

[0005] The puzzle was submitted to a number of newspaper syndicates in the 1980's, by Norman F. Irwin the inventor of the present invention.

[0006] A newspaper syndicate located at the time in Anaheim, Calif. became interested in the newspaper puzzle, but unfortunately an agreement did not materialize. This was due in part to the various styles and alphabets used on the telephone key pad that were in place in other parts of the world at the time. These key pad alphabets differed too much from the North American standard to such an extent that the newspaper syndicate did not feel it could sell the puzzle worldwide and so the puzzle was put aside by the inventor for a time.

[0007] The inventor applied for a Canadian trademark for the words `DIAL A WORD` in 2002 with the intension of using this name in resurrecting the newspaper puzzle again and submitting the newspaper puzzle to a number of different newspaper syndicates and book publishers, but due in part to the increase at the time of hand held video games and assorted online puzzles, the newspaper syndicates and book publishers gave a lackluster response.

[0008] To solve the newspaper puzzle, the player was required to decipher clues given as telephone numbers on the left side of the puzzle and sentence clues given on the right side of the puzzle. The player tried to determine the hidden words using the corresponding letters on the keypad of their telephone or cell phone. An example of a telephone key pad was printed on the puzzle face to aid any player who did not have access to a telephone at the time.

[0009] It must be noted, that the numbers on the key pad of a telephone or cell phone correspond to a very specific group of letters. Examples of these specific groups are the number 2 on a telephone or cell phone key pad, it corresponds to the letters ABC, the letter 7 on the a telephone or cell phone keypad which in turn corresponds to the letters PQRS and the number 5 on a telephone or cell phone keypad which corresponds to the letters JKL.

[0010] Using the cell phone or telephone keypad, the player tried to decipher the telephone number clues into the correct letters and write the correct letters in the printed squares on the page. When the player had deciphered all the clues, certain letters, written in the printed boxes, would have circles around them. The player would then use these circled letters to further decipher a cryptogram that was located below the printed squares. The answer was to be published in the next edition of the newspaper along with a new puzzle.

[0011] After the newspaper puzzle's lackluster response and knowing the concept of using the telephone key pad as a basis for a game was feasible, the present invention was devised, a word game based on the unique numbering and lettering of the telephone rotary dial and telephone key pad.

[0012] At the time of the newspaper puzzle's inception, there were no other newspaper puzzles, puzzle books, word games, word card games or any other game or puzzle of any description that was based on the keypad or rotary dial of the telephone, a fact that remains so today. There is not to be found anywhere, any board games, puzzle games, card games, puzzle cryptograms, jumbles or any similar word solving or word forming game or puzzle having as a basis, the key pad or rotary dial of a telephone or cellphone.

[0013] Many games are available which utilize the skill and imagination of the players. Word games in particular have become popular by utilizing such skill. These games are both challenging and enjoyable to play. These games are also educational since they require the player to use his imagination and his word knowledge to play the game.

[0014] Most of the word games that are available utilize a board and some kind of playing piece to form the words. These games, although they use the player's skill and creativity to form the words, tend because of the boards incorporated in their play, to be generally bulky and/or require letter holders and other playing apparatuses in order to play the game.

[0015] The present invention is a word game that features a very compact and almost utilitarian approach; in that the game requires no board, no apparatuses and does not need playing piece holders in order to play.

[0016] The public at large has over the years been exposed to the familiarity of a telephone number being used as a text or as an advertising slogan. An example is the telephone number 289-6636. When you look at the keys, on the telephone key pad corresponding to these numbers, you can spell the words BUY MOEN. Many companies have for years used this type of advertising as a simple and direct way to get their name or message before the public.

[0017] An example of a game that was based on this concept is the SLOGAN CARD GAME (U.S. Pat. No. 1,542,919 by Bloom) which involved the use of well known advertising slogans of the day as the part of the play of the game.

[0018] There are a number of games in which more than one letter is on the card. One that comes to mind is T.A.N.G.O. (Word Card Game U.S. Pat. No. 4,877,255 Canadian Patent Number CA1327617). This game utilizes cards that have a different letter on the top and another different letter on the bottom. Although this game utilizes more than one letter per card it does not allow for any greater number of choices than that which a player has with the cards he is dealt. In the present invention the number of letters that are available to a player include all the letters on all the playing pieces that come with game and decreases conversely as each player forms a word in a round, making the game a little more difficult for every subsequent player. This allows for a more challenging game than one in which the player has to rely only on the cards dealt him.

[0019] There are many word games, Scrabble, Boggle, Balderdash, and the aforementioned T.A.N.G.O. to name a few. There is also a number of word creating card games PDQ (The Pretty Darn Quick Word Game), Scrabble Slam, Tri-Versity. These games are based on the idea of forming words using a single lettered card or playing piece or using cards with a limited number of letters mostly no more than two. This is a decided inadequacy. The present invention solves this inadequacy, by using playing pieces which provide a greater number of choices when forming words, because of their increased letter count per piece, in comparison to other games. This greater choice of letters on the playing pieces, along with the public's already familiarity with the telephone key pad, increases the likelihood that the players will find the game challenging, educational, stimulating, and above all fun.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0020] 1) Accordingly, it is the object of the present invention to provide a new and improved game utilizing a unique plurality of playing pieces for forming words. [0021] 2) Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and exciting game wherein a certain familiarity is already established. [0022] 3) Another object of the present invention is to utilize the playing in connection with a word game, wherein the letters on the face of all the face-up playing pieces are used by the players to form a word in subsequently decreasing amounts. [0023] 4) Another object of the present invention is to provide a plurality of playing pieces wherein a considerable number of the playing pieces have three different letters to choose from on different playing pieces and, further, that two of the differently numbered playing pieces have four letters to choose from and one style of playing piece has the unique ability of being able to be any of the letters in the twenty-six letter English alphabet. Thus there are a huge number of possible letter choices a player can use to form a word. [0024] 5) Another object of the present invention is to provide a plurality of playing pieces wherein each playing piece in said series has a unique combination of a particular numerical indicator and a particular alphabet indicator meaning such that no two playing pieces in the series are duplicates of one another. [0025] 6) Another object of the present invention is to provide a plurality of playing pieces wherein the numbers on the face of the playing pieces are of no specific size and the letters on the face of the playing pieces are also of no specific size, and the relationship as to size of the numbers to the letters is of no specific ratio, and further the numbers can be oriented in any position as to their placement next to or in proximity to the letters on the face of the playing pieces. [0026] 7) Another object of the present invention is to provide a plurality of playing pieces wherein six of the said playing pieces have a number on their face and more specifically the digit `1` and also on the playing piece face are the words `ANY LETTER`. The number `1` is of no particular size or ratio in relation to the words `ANY LETTER` and the placement of the number `1` and the words `ANY LETTER` is such that the two may be in any position as to their placement on the face of the playing piece, next to and in proximity to each other. These six playing pieces are referred to as the `wild cards`. [0027] 8) Another object of the present invention, wherein distribution of the playing pieces is in a unique manner, such that all the playing pieces are turned face-up and placed in rows in the middle of the playing area. [0028] 9) Another object of the present invention is to allow players to accumulate points by forming words from the playing pieces in the play area and then removing the playing pieces that they used from the playing area. This creates a lesser number of playing pieces from which the player's subsequent opponent has to choose from, in order to form a word, thus making the game more difficult for that player and each subsequent player.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0029] FIG. 1 is a view of a digital design that is meant to be representational of a typical key pad of a typical telephone. NOTE: the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia that make up the designators depicted on this drawing are for reference to the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia only and do not indicated specific placement, sizes or ratio of the numeric indicia as it relates to the alphabet indicia.

[0030] FIG. 2 is view of the face of the `number 1` playing piece, the so called wild card. NOTE: the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia that make up the designators depicted on this drawing are for reference to the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia only and do not indicated specific placement, sizes or ratio of the numeric indicia as it relates to the alphabet indicia.

[0031] FIG. 3 is a view of the face of the `number 2` playing piece. NOTE: the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia that make up the designators depicted on this drawing are for reference to the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia only and do not indicated specific placement, sizes or ratio of the numeric indicia as it relates to the alphabet indicia.

[0032] FIG. 4 is a view of the face of the `number 3` playing piece. NOTE: the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia that make up the designators depicted on this drawing are for reference to the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia only and do not indicated specific placement, sizes or ratio of the numeric indicia as it relates to the alphabet indicia.

[0033] FIG. 5 is a view of the face of the `number 4` playing piece. NOTE: the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia that make up the designators depicted on this drawing are for reference to the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia only and do not indicated specific placement, sizes or ratio of the numeric indicia as it relates to the alphabet indicia.

[0034] FIG. 6 is a view of the face of the `number 5` playing piece. NOTE: the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia that make up the designators depicted on this drawing are for reference to the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia only and do not indicated specific placement, sizes or ratio of the numeric indicia as it relates to the alphabet indicia.

[0035] FIG. 7 is a view of the face of the `number 6` piece. NOTE: the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia that make up the designators depicted on this drawing are for reference to the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia only and do not indicated specific placement, sizes or ratio of the numeric indicia as it relates to the alphabet indicia.

[0036] FIG. 8 is a view of the face of the `number 7` playing piece. NOTE: the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia that make up the designators depicted on this drawing are for reference to the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia only and do not indicated specific placement, sizes or ratio of the numeric indicia as it relates to the alphabet indicia.

[0037] FIG. 9 is a view of the face of the `number 8` playing piece. NOTE: the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia that make up the designators depicted on this drawing are for reference to the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia only and do not indicated specific placement, sizes or ratio of the numeric indicia as it relates to the alphabet indicia.

[0038] FIG. 10 is a view of the face of the `number 9` playing piece. NOTE: the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia that make up the designators depicted on this drawing are for reference to the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia only and do not indicated specific placement, sizes or ratio of the numeric indicia as it relates to the alphabet indicia.

[0039] FIG. 11 is a depiction of the rotation of a playing piece showing that the playing piece's designation is equal at either end, regardless of orientation, if the playing piece is rotated around a center axis. NOTE: the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia that make up the designators depicted on this drawing are for reference to the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia only and do not indicated specific placement, sizes or ratio of the numeric indicia as it relates to the alphabet indicia.

[0040] FIG. 12 depicts a set of the nine different playing pieces, depicted as playing cards, which make up one of the equivalent series of the complete plurality with the individual playing pieces numbered. NOTE: the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia that make up the designators depicted on this drawing are for reference to the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia only and do not indicated specific placement, sizes or ratio of the numeric indicia as it relates to the alphabet indicia.

[0041] FIG. 13 is a depiction of the upper and lower designators as they are graphically laid out on a typical playing piece and as they relate to the sides of the playing piece if the playing piece is rectangular in shape. The number 87 and 89 indicates the relation to the short and long sides as they relate to where a player 90 is sitting. NOTE: the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia that make up the designators depicted on this drawing are for reference to the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia only and do not indicated specific placement, sizes or ratio of the numeric indicia as it relates to the alphabet indicia.

[0042] FIG. 14 is a depiction of the face of a typical playing piece, in this case the number 9 playing piece, showing the playing piece's designator (9WXYZ) which is made up of both a numeric indicia and alphabet indicia shown at 91 and again at 92. NOTE: the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia that make up the designators depicted on this drawing are for reference to the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia only and do not indicated specific placement, sizes or ratio of the numeric indicia as it relates to the alphabet indicia.

[0043] FIG. 15 is a depiction of the placement of playing pieces 93 as they appear at the beginning of a game. The number of rows and playing pieces shown is for reference only and does not constitute in any way an exact number of rows or an exact number of playing pieces. NOTE: the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia that make up the designators depicted on this drawing are for reference to the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia only and do not indicated specific placement, sizes or ratio of the numeric indicia as it relates to the alphabet indicia.

[0044] FIG. 16 shows the typical placement of the playing pieces 94 as they might appear when one player has formed a word, in this example the word `QUIZZED` 95 and the player has subsequently removed the playing pieces used to form the said word from the playing area and lined the playing pieces in a row to show the other players. The number of rows and playing pieces shown is for reference only and does not constitute in any way an exact number of rows or an exact number of playing pieces. NOTE: the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia that make up the designators depicted on this drawing are for reference to the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia only and do not indicated specific placement, sizes or ratio of the numeric indicia as it relates to the alphabet indicia.

[0045] FIG. 17 shows how the playing area 96 as it might appear when one of the subsequent players has formed a word, in this example, the word `DODDERING` 97 and has then removed the playing pieces used to form the said word from the play area and lined the playing pieces in a row to show the other players. The number of rows and playing pieces shown is for reference only and does not constitute in any way an exact number of rows or an exact number of playing pieces. NOTE: the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia that make up the designators depicted on this drawing are for reference to the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia only and do not indicated specific placement, sizes or ratio of the numeric indicia as it relates to the alphabet indicia.

[0046] FIG. 18 Shows the playing pieces as they would appear as square tiles or tablets. NOTE: the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia that make up the designators depicted on this drawing are for reference to the numeric indicia and alphabet indicia only and do not indicated specific placement, sizes or ratio of the numeric indicia as it relates to the alphabet indicia.

PRIOR ART

[0047] Patent # CA1327617 Von Braunhut 3/1994 [0048] Patent # CA2138440 O'Connor 12/1994 [0049] Patent# CA773016 Salonsky 12/1967 [0050] U.S. Pat. No. 6,234,486 Wallice 5/2001 [0051] U.S. Pat. No. 4,877,255 von Braunhut 10/1989 [0052] U.S. Pat. No. 4,826,175 Quatrino 5/1989 [0053] U.S. Pat. No. 4,333,656 Sommer 6/1982 [0054] U.S. Pat. No. 5,409,237 Marcley et al. 4/1995 [0055] U.S. Pat. No. 4,219,197 Acuff 8/1980 [0056] U.S. Pat. No. 4,402,513 Head 9/1983 [0057] U.S. Pat. No. 4,192,513 Feeley et al. 3/1980 [0058] U.S. Pat. No. 5,727,788 Davis 3/1998 [0059] U.S. Pat. No. 4,775,157 Armstrong 10/1988 [0060] U.S. Pat. No. 1,542,819 Bloom 6/1925

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0061] The present invention is a word game that can be played by 2 to 6 players. The present invention is also a word game consisting of a supplied plurality of playing pieces and the described method of play in which the playing pieces are used. Playing piece in this description means a playing piece that resembles a rectangular playing card as shown in FIG. 12 and/or a playing piece that resembles a square tile or tablet as shown in FIG. 18. The term playing piece herein refers to either or both of the preceding descriptions and each of the preceding description is interchangeable with the other.

[0062] The plurality of said playing pieces is a combination of a number of series of nine playing pieces as shown in FIG. 12 and as shown in FIG. 18. The described method of play begins by choosing the player who will form the first word in the round of the game. The selection process of this first player is as follows; each player selects, without looking at the playing pieces while the selection is taking place, one playing piece from a container that contains a complete set of playing pieces, the player who selects the playing piece with the highest numerically designated playing piece will be declared the player and will start the play first in the round. Further, another method of choosing the first player is with a die, the player who rolls the highest number on the die is declared the first player of the round. Either before or after the first player has been selected the game can commence with the playing pieces being placed in the playing area.

[0063] The present invention is a word game in which each and all of the playing pieces, at the commencement of the game, are randomly placed face-up in the middle of the playing area on an imagined grid as follows; each and all of the playing pieces are randomly laid out on the imagined grid which consists of no particular number of rows of no particular number of playing pieces, and further meaning that each one of the rows individually consist of no particular number of randomly placed playing pieces and the said playing pieces are placed side by side as to their relationship to each other means the imagined grid therefore consists of no particular number of rows of no particular number of playing pieces being laid out similar to the grid as is shown in (FIG. 15) 93 (the number of rows and playing pieces shown is for reference only and does not constitute in any way an exact number of rows or an exact number of playing pieces). The player who has the first turn in the round selects from the grid of rows of playing pieces as is shown in (FIG. 15) 93 (the number of rows and playing pieces shown is for reference only and does not constitute in any way an exact number of rows or an exact number of playing pieces), a specific number of the playing pieces, and this specific number is the number of playing pieces needed to match the number of letters in the word selected and as the letters on the individual playing pieces chosen relate to the player's selected word

[0064] The following is a description of a word being formed by a player in a typical manner and the relationship between the playing pieces and the player's chosen word when counting the points for the word: This description reflects the process by which the first player and each subsequent player would select the playing pieces and how the said playing pieces relate to the said player's chosen word.

[0065] A player using the following playing pieces, which have on their face the letters `PQRS` FIG. 8, `TUV` FIG. 9, `GHI` FIG. 5, two playing pieces with the letters `WXYZ` FIG. 10 on both of the playing pieces and two playing pieces that have `DEF` FIG. 4 on both of the playing pieces, uses these playing pieces to form the word `QUIZZED` (FIG. 16) 95, by using one of the correct letters from each of the said playing pieces. The breakdown is as follows; the `Q` as shown at 47 and again at 52 on the `7` playing piece FIG. 8 containing the letters `PQRS` would count as `seven points` because the 7 is the numeric value of the 7 playing piece. The shown at 57 and again at 61 from the `8` playing piece FIG. 9, and containing the letters `TUV`, would count as `eight points` because the 8 playing piece has a numerical value of 8. The `I` shown at 24 and again at 28 from the `4` playing piece FIG. 5 which contains the letters `GHI` would count as `four points` because the numerical value of the 4 playing piece is 4. The two `9` playing pieces FIG. 10 which contain the letters `WXYZ` would count as `nine points` each (2.times.9 points=18 points) because each playing piece has a letter `Z` shown at 67 and again at 72 and each letter `Z` shown at 67 and again at 72 is used in the word `QUIZZED` (FIG. 16) 95, two times. The `3` playing piece FIG. 4 of which there are two, one using the `E` shown at 15 and again at 19 from the letters `DEF` and one using the D' shown at 14 and again at 18 from the letters `DEF` would count a point score of 6 (2.times.3 points=6 points), `three points` for the `E` shown at 15 and again at 19, and `three points` for the `D` shown at 14 and again at 18. The numeric count of each of the single letters `Q`, `U`, `I`, `Z`, `Z`, `E`, `D` (FIG. 16) 95, is then added together to get the total for the word, these points being 7+8+4+9+9+3+3=39. The player who formed the word `QUIZZED` (FIG. 16) 95 would therefore accumulate 39 points toward their total points. The playing pieces the player selected to form the player's said word would be removed from the playing area and retained by the player (FIG. 16) 95.

[0066] Another example of the forming of a word and the point count as it relates to the chosen word is as follows, a player forms the word `DODDERING` (FIG. 17) 97, which counts the same score of 39 points, as the word `QUIZZED` shown above using the playing pieces with the letters `DEF` FIG. 4, `MNO` FIG. 7, `DEF` FIG. 4, `DEF` FIG. 4, `DEF` FIG. 4, `PQRS` FIG. 8, `GHI` FIG. 5, `MNO` FIG. 7, `GHI` FIG. 5 and a single letter from each of these playing pieces, specifically the single letters `D`, `O`, `D`, `D`, `E`, `R`, `I`, `N`, `G`. The point count for the word `DODDERING` (FIG. 17) 97, would be as follows, the `3` playing piece FIG. 4 with letters `DEF` would count `three points` for the use of the letter `D` shown at 14, and again at 18, because 3 is the numeric value of the 3 playing piece. The `6` playing piece FIG. 7 with the letters `MNO` would count `six points` for the use of the letter `O` shown at 40, and again at 44, because 6 is the numeric value of the 6 playing piece. The `3` playing piece FIG. 4 with the letters `DEF` would count `three points` for the use of the letter `D` shown at 14, and again at 18, because the numeric value of the 3 playing piece is 3. The `3` playing piece FIG. 4 with the letters `DEF` would count `three points` again for use of the other letter `D` shown at 14 and again at 18, would count `three points` because the numeric value of the 3 playing piece is 3. The `3` playing piece FIG. 4 with the letters DEF' would count `three points` once again for use of the letter `E` shown at 15, and again at 19, because the numeric value of the 3 playing piece is 3. The `7` playing piece FIG. 8 with the letters `PARS` would count `seven points` for the use of the letter `R` shown at 48, and again at 53, because 7 is the numeric value of the 7 playing piece.

[0067] The `4` playing piece FIG. 5 with the letters `GHI` would count `four points` for the use of the letter `I` shown at 24, and again at 28, because 4 is the numeric value of the 4 playing piece. Again the `6` playing piece FIG. 7 with the letters `MNO` is counted `six points` for the use of the letter `N` shown at 39, and again at 43, because 6 is the numeric value of the 6 playing piece. And finally another `4` playing piece FIG. 5 with the letters `GHI` is counted `four points` for the use of the letter `G` shown at 22 and again at 26 because the numeric value of the 4 playing piece is 4.

[0068] The point count for the word `D`, `O`, `D`, `D`, `E`, `R`, `I`, `N`, `G`, (FIG. 17) 97, is the total of the numeric value of all the playing pieces used to form the word when added together, 3+6+3+3+3+7+4+6+4=39.

[0069] The playing pieces used to form the word `DODDERING` (FIG. 17) 97 would be removed by the player who formed the said word `DODDERING` (FIG. 17) 97, and said playing pieces would be retained by the player and the numerical count of the said playing pieces would be added to the said player' accumulated point count.

[0070] The playing piece used in the present invention has a face of a special design. The face of the playing piece used in the present invention is designed in such a way as to represent the individual keys on a typical telephone key pad as is depicted in FIG. 1. The design of the face of playing pieces used in the playing of the game are shown in FIG. 12 and FIG. 18 and more specifically in FIG. 2, FIG. 3, FIG. 4, FIG. 5, FIG. 6, FIG. 7, FIG. 8, FIG. 9, and FIG. 10. There are a number of series of the nine playing pieces shown, which when combined, make up the plurality of the playing pieces, this number is of no specific amount.

[0071] Although there are multiples of letters, on each individual playing piece, only one letter from each of the playing pieces may be used at any one time to form the words the players use. An example of this is playing piece number 2 FIG. 3, the alphabet indicia for this playing piece is `ABC`. The player can only use one of the letters per playing piece, the `A` shown at 6, and again at 10, or the `B` shown at 7, and again at 11 or the `C` shown at 8, and again at 12. This is the same for all the playing pieces, only one letter from each playing piece may be used at any one time.

[0072] Referring now to FIG. 11 it will be seen that the playing pieces in the present invention use both numeric indicia 73 and alphabet indicia 74. It will also be seen that if the playing piece is rotated on an axis the same numeric indicia 73 and alphabet indicia 74, which are then shown at 75 and 76 respectively, only change position not value.

[0073] Any reference in this document to he, his, him, hers, her, she, they, their, theirs, or any other referral in regard to gender, is only for reference to a generic player and is not a specific reference to gender in any form.

[0074] A timer of some type may be used to speed the progress of the game. The timer used may be of any type electric, egg, etc.

A Typical Method of Play would be as Follows;

Starting The Game

[0075] The playing pieces may consist of different shapes depending on the game purchased. For example one shape may resemble a playing card and another shape may resemble a tile or small tablet.

[0076] To start the game, if the playing pieces are in the form of a playing card, the deck of cards is shuffled and is placed in the middle of the play area. Conversely, if the playing pieces are in a form of a tile or tablet, the playing pieces may be placed in a container and the container shaken to mix up the playing pieces before they are laid out for the play of the game. A die may be used to determine the player who goes first

[0077] The game begins with each player drawing one card from the deck of cards, or one playing piece from the aforementioned container. If a die is used the player who rolls the highest number is the player who goes first. Further the player who drew the card with the highest numerical value on the face of the card or the player who drew the tile style playing piece first, meaning this player is the first player that attempts to form a word using the laid out playing pieces as shown in FIG. 15.

[0078] The playing pieces are laid out on the playing area in the following manner; The playing pieces are placed in eight rows consisting of eight playing pieces each as shown in FIG. 15. The player who is declared the first player by virtue of winning the draw of the playing pieces or by the throw of the die, attempts to form a word using the letters on the playing pieces.

The player must form a word using the following criteria; A word must be correctly spelled. A word must be a least four letters in length. A word, in order to qualify, has to be in the dictionary that the players are using during the game. In the event that the players have more than one dictionary, only one dictionary is allowed and the players must agree before the start of the game which dictionary will be used.

[0079] The use of a hyphen may be necessary, at times, in order to form a word. The playing pieces with the designator `1 any letter` FIG. 2 must be used in this case to indicate the hyphen within the word. (For example, to spell the word X-RAY, a player would use the following playing pieces, `X` shown at 65, and again at 70 FIG. 10, `ANY LETTER` shown at 2, and again at 3 FIG. 2 (ANY LETTER in this case is being used as the hyphen), `R` shown at 48, and again at 53 FIG. 8, `A` shown at 6 and again at 10 FIG. 3 and `Y` shown at 66 and again at 71 FIG. 10).

The following is a description of a word being formed by a player in a typical manner:

[0080] A player using the following playing pieces, which have on their face the letters `PQRS` FIG. 8, `TUV` FIG. 9, `GHI` FIG. 5, two playing pieces with the letters `WXYZ` FIG. 10 on both of the playing pieces and two playing pieces that have `DEF` FIG. 4 on both of the playing pieces, uses these playing pieces to form the word `QUIZZED` (FIG. 16) 95, by using one of the correct letters from each of the said playing pieces.

[0081] The breakdown is as follows; the `Q` as shown at 47 and again at 52 on the `7` playing piece FIG. 8 containing the letters `PQRS` would count as `seven points` because the 7 is the numeric value of the 7 playing piece. The `U` shown at 57 and again at 61 from the `8` playing piece FIG. 9, and containing the letters `TUV`, would count as `eight points` because the 8 playing piece has a numerical value of 8. The `I` shown at 24 and again at 28 from the `4` playing piece FIG. 5 which contains the letters `GHI` would count as `four points` because the numerical value of the 4 playing piece is 4. The two `9` playing pieces FIG. 10 which contain the letters `WXYZ` would count as `nine points` each (2.times.9 points=18 points) because each playing piece has a letter `Z` shown at 67 and again at 72 and each letter `Z` shown at 67 and again at 72 is used in the word `QUIZZED` (FIG. 16) 95, two times. The `3` playing piece FIG. 4 of which there are two, one using the `E` shown at 15 and again at 19 from the letters `DEF` and one using the `D` shown at 14 and again at 18 from the letters `DEF` would count a point score of 6 (2.times.3 points=6 points), `three points` for the `E` shown at 15 and again at 19, and `three points` for the `D` shown at 14 and again at 18. The numeric count of each of the single letters `Q`, `U`, `I`, `Z`, `Z`, `E`, `D` (FIG. 16) 95, is then added together to get the total for the word, these points being 7+8+4+9+9+3+3=39. The player who formed the word `QUIZZED` (FIG. 16) 95, would therefore accumulate 39 points toward their total points. The playing pieces the player selected to form the player's said word would be removed from the playing area and retained by the player (FIG. 16) 95.

[0082] Another example of the forming of a word and the point count as it relates to the chosen word is as follows, a player forms the word `DODDERING`, (FIG. 17) 97, which counts the same score of 39 points, as the word `QUIZZED` (FIG. 16) 95, shown above using the playing pieces with the letters `DEF` FIG. 4, `MNO` FIG. 7, `DEF` FIG. 4, `DEF` FIG. 4, `DEF` FIG. 4, `PQRS` FIG. 8, `GHI` FIG. 5, `MNO` FIG. 7, `GHI` FIG. 5 and a single letter from each of these playing pieces, specifically the single letters `D`, `O`, `D`, `D`, `E`, `R`, `N`, `G`. The point count for the word `DODDERING` would be as follows, the `3` playing piece FIG. 4 with letters `DEF` would count `three points` for the use of the letter `D` shown at 14, and again at 18, because 3 is the numeric value of the 3 playing piece. The `6` playing piece FIG. 7 with the letters `MNO` would count `six points` for the use of the letter `O` shown at 40, and again at 44, because 6 is the numeric value of the 6 playing piece. The `3` playing piece FIG. 4 with the letters `DEF` would count `three points` for the use of the letter `D` shown at 14, and again at 18, because the numeric value of the 3 playing piece is 3. The `3` playing piece FIG. 4 with the letters `DEF` would count `three points` again for use of the other letter `D` shown at 14 and again at 18, would count `three points` because the numeric value of the 3 playing piece is 3. The `3` playing piece FIG. 4 with the letters `DEF` would count `three points` once again for use of the letter `E` shown at 15, and again at 19, because the numeric value of the 3 playing piece is 3. The `7` playing piece FIG. 8 with the letters `PQRS` would count `seven points` for the use of the letter `R` shown at 48, and again at 53, because 7 is the numeric value of the 7 playing piece. The `4` playing piece FIG. 5 with the letters `GHI` would count `four points` for the use of the letter `I` shown at 24, and again at 28, because 4 is the numeric value of the 4 playing piece. Again the `6` playing piece FIG. 7 with the letters `MNO` is counted `six points` for the use of the letter `N` shown at 39, and again at 43, because 6 is the numeric value of the 6 playing piece. And finally another `4` playing piece FIG. 5 with the letters `GHI` is counted `four points` for the use of the letter `G` shown at 22 and again at 26 because the numeric value of the 4 playing piece is 4.

[0083] The point count for the word `D`, `O`, `D`, `D`, `E`, `R`, `I`, `N`, `G`, (FIG. 17) 97, is the total of the numeric value of all the playing pieces used to form the word when added together, 3+6+3+3+3+7+4+6+4=39.

[0084] The playing pieces used to form the word `DODDERING` (FIG. 17) 97, would be removed by the player who formed the said word `DODDERING` (FIG. 17) 97, and said playing pieces would be retained by the player and the numerical count of the said playing pieces would be added to the said player' accumulated point count.

[0085] The points for the word would be added to the total score a player has accumulated and the winner of the game is declared when any player's score reaches a predetermined amount, 500 points, 1000 points, etc.

* * * * *