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United States Patent Application 20110280997
Kind Code A1
O'Connor; Sean Francis ;   et al. November 17, 2011

REFRIGERATOR-STABLE PANCAKE & WAFFLE BATTER IN A PRESSURIZED CAN

Abstract

An unpasteurized pancake and waffle batter is provided in a pressurized dispenser and can be used to bake a variety of food products. In embodiments of the present invention, raw ingredients including flour, sugar and egg are mixed with water in a cold process to create a batter having a water activity of approximately 0.96. The batter is sealed in a dispenser and pressurized with a gas such as carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide reduces the viscosity of the batter to allow the batter to be dispensed for the life time of the product. The carbon dioxide aerates the food product giving light and fluffy baked products and also serves as a browning agent.


Inventors: O'Connor; Sean Francis; (Austin, TX) ; Steck; Nathan; (San Francisco, CA)
Assignee: BLASTER FOOD TECHNOLOGIES, LP
SCOTTSDALE
AZ

Serial No.: 189011
Series Code: 13
Filed: July 22, 2011

Current U.S. Class: 426/116
Class at Publication: 426/116
International Class: B65D 85/72 20060101 B65D085/72; A21D 10/04 20060101 A21D010/04


Claims



1. A packaged food product comprising: an unpasteurized pancake and waffle batter including a plurality of raw ingredients mixed at a temperature below about 4.degree. C., the batter having a water activity of approximately 0.96; said batter sealed in a dispenser; the dispenser pressurized with a gas; the dispenser having a valve through which said batter can be manually dispensed; wherein said batter, when sealed and pressurized in said dispenser, has a refrigerated shelf-life greater than approximately 120 days.

2. The packaged food product of claim 1, wherein the said batter comprises: flour, sugar and egg mixed with water at a temperature below about 4.degree. C., the batter having a water activity of approximately 0.96.

3. The packaged food product of claim 1, wherein said batter comprises: flour, sugar, sodium lactate, and egg mixed with water at a temperature below about 4.degree. C., the batter having a water activity of approximately 0.96.

4. The packaged food product of claim 1, wherein said batter comprises: flour, sugar, cultured dextrose, and egg mixed with water at a temperature below about 4.degree. C., the batter having a water activity of approximately 0.96.

5. The packaged food product of claim 1, wherein said batter has a viscosity greater than approximately 12000 cP.

6. The packaged food product of claim 1, wherein said batter has a viscosity less than approximately 14000 cP.

7. The packaged food product of claim 1, wherein said batter has a viscosity greater than approximately 12000 cP and less than approximately 14000 cP.

8. The packaged food product of claim 1, wherein the batter has a pH of approximately 6.

9. The packaged food product of claim 1, wherein said gas includes carbon dioxide.

10. The packaged food product of claim 1, wherein said gas includes carbon dioxide and wherein the batter when pressurized with said gas is phase stable over a temperature range between: a lower limit of approximately -5.degree. C.; and an upper limit of approximately 35.degree. C.

11. A packaged food product comprising: an unpasteurized pancake and waffle batter including a plurality of raw ingredients mixed at a temperature below about 4.degree. C., the batter having a water activity of approximately 0.96; said batter sealed in a dispenser; the dispenser pressurized with a water soluble gas; the dispenser having a valve through which said batter can be manually dispensed; wherein said batter, when sealed and pressurized in said dispenser, has a refrigerated shelf-life greater than approximately 120 days.

12. The packaged food product of claim 11, wherein the said batter comprises: flour, sugar and egg mixed with water at a temperature below about 4.degree. C., the batter having a water activity of approximately 0.96.

13. The packaged food product of claim 11, wherein said batter comprises: flour, sugar, sodium lactate, and egg mixed with water at a temperature below about 4.degree. C., the batter having a water activity of approximately 0.96.

14. The packaged food product of claim 11, wherein said batter comprises: flour, sugar, cultured dextrose, and egg mixed with water at a temperature below about 4.degree. C., the batter having a water activity of approximately 0.96.

15. The packaged food product of claim 11, wherein said batter has a viscosity greater than approximately 12000 cP.

16. The packaged food product of claim 11, wherein said batter has a viscosity less than approximately 14000 cP.

17. The packaged food product of claim 11, wherein the batter has a pH of approximately 6.

18. The packaged food product of claim 11, wherein said gas includes carbon dioxide.

19. The packaged food product of claim 11, wherein said gas includes carbon dioxide and wherein the batter when pressurized with said gas is phase stabile over a temperature range between: a lower limit of approximately -5.degree. C.; and an upper limit of approximately 35.degree. C.

20. A packaged food product comprising: an unpasteurized pancake and waffle batter including a plurality of raw ingredients including flour, sugar and egg, mixed with water at a temperature below about 4.degree. C., the batter having a water activity of approximately 0.96; said batter sealed in a dispenser; the dispenser pressurized with a gas including carbon dioxide; the dispenser having a valve through which said batter can be manually dispensed; and wherein said batter, when sealed and pressurized in said dispenser has a viscosity greater than approximately 12000 cP and less than approximately 14000 cP, a refrigerated shelf-life greater than approximately 120 days, and wherein said batter is phase stabile over a temperature range between -5.degree. C.; and 35.degree. C.
Description



PRIORITY CLAIM

[0001] The present application claims priority to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/760,647 entitled "REFRIGERATOR STABLE PRESSURIZED BAKING BATTER" filed Jun. 8, 2007 which claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/812,674, entitled "REFRIGERATOR STABLE PRESSURIZED BAKING BATTER", inventors: Sean Francis O'Connor and Nathan Steck, filed Jun. 9, 2006, both of which applications are incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0002] The present invention is directed to food products, specifically pre-mixed or ready to cook batters and dough.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0003] A number of different types of food products come in pressurized dispensers, including decorative icings, dessert toppings, whipping cream, whipped cream substitute and Cheez Whiz.RTM., a thick sauce product made by Kraft Foods.RTM..

[0004] Consumers have come to find foods provided in pressurized cans to be convenient to use. Hence, different foods provided in such a manner are advantageous. Typically, dough and batter used in baking comes in dry form or must be assembled from component ingredients from scratch.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0005] Although a number of inventors have proposed bakable batters in a pressurized can, there is no commercially successful product currently on the market. This reflects the problem in developing a batter that has an acceptable shelf storage life in a pressurized can, the ability to freeze store the product without deleterious separation of components, obtaining an attractively browned appearance, a palatable taste and light and fluffy texture when baked.

[0006] In various embodiments of the present invention, a cold process of preparing a food product to be provided in a pressurized can without the need for pasteurization of the ingredients results in a refrigeration stable product. In various embodiments of the present invention, a cold process of preparing a food product to be provided in a pressurized can without the need for pasteurization of all of the ingredients results in a refrigeration stable product. In various embodiments of the present invention, the ingredients include a browning agent which is used to control the appearance and texture of the product. In various embodiments of the present invention, the ingredients enable freezing and thawing of the product without phase separations. In various embodiments of the present invention, a browning agent is used which is compatible with the cold process and pressurized can application of the product. In various embodiments of the present invention, the ingredients used to allow freezing and thawing are compatible with one or more of the browning agent, the cold process preservation and pressurized can application of the product. In various embodiments of the present invention, the ingredients stored in the can include one or more preservative. In various embodiments of the present invention, different baking products including waffles, pancakes, muffins, cup cakes, ginger bread, cookies and brownies are formulated using the cold process into a ready to use pressurized can and dispensed directly into the cooking apparatus. In various embodiments of the present invention, the batter in the can be combined with gasses and a water-mixed dry batter recipe under pressure.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

[0007] This application contains at least one drawing or photograph executed in color. Copies of this patent application publication with color drawing(s) will be provided by the Office upon request and payment of the necessary fee.

[0008] This invention is described with respect to specific embodiments thereof. Additional aspects can be appreciated from the Figures in which:

[0009] FIG. 1 shows a flow chart outlining the steps involved in preparing the batter for dispensing;

[0010] FIG. 2 shows the Change in Pressure in Un-pressurized Cans (Dots--0.15% Sorbates, no N.sub.2 Cap; Vertical Lines--0.15% Sorbates, N.sub.2 Cap; Horizontal Lines--0.15% Sorbates, 1.0% Lactic acid, no N.sub.2 Cap; Black--0.15% Sorbates, 1.0% Lactic acid, N.sub.2 Cap);

[0011] FIG. 3 shows the Change in Pressure in CO.sub.2 Pressurized Cans (Dots--1.0% Sorbates; Vertical Lines--1.0% Sorbates, 200 ppm EDTA; Horizontal Lines--1.0% Sorbates, 500 ppm EDTA; Diagonal Stripes LtoR--1.0% Sorbates, 0.1% Sodium benzoate; Black--1.0% Sorbates, 0.075% Propyl Paraben, 0.025% Methyl Paraben; Diagonal Stripes RtoL--1.0% Sorbates, 0.5% Lactic acid; White--1.0% Sorbates, 1.0% Lactic acid);

[0012] FIG. 4 shows the Change in Pressure in N.sub.2 Pressurized Cans (Dots--1.0% Sorbates; Vertical Lines--1.0% Sorbates, 200 ppm EDTA; Horizontal Lines--1.0% Sorbates, 500 ppm EDTA; Diagonal Stripes LtoR--1.0% Sorbates, 0.1% Sodium benzoate; Black--1.0% Sorbates, 0.075% Propyl Paraben, 0.025% Methyl Paraben; Diagonal Stripes RtoL--1.0% Sorbates, 0.5% Lactic acid; White--1.0% Sorbates, 1.0% Lactic acid); and

[0013] FIG. 5 shows a comparison between waffles (10 and 30) and pancakes (20 and 40), where the waffles and pancakes are baked using batter mixed and dispensed with carbon dioxide from a pressurized canister (10 and 20) or the batter is not mixed or dispensed with carbon dioxide but applied directly to the waffle iron or frying pan (30 and 40).

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0014] In an embodiment of the present invention, a batter mix such as that which can be useful for making pancakes, waffles, muffins, cup cakes, ginger bread, cookies and brownies can be mixed with water and transferred to a can. In an embodiment of the present invention, an antibacterial agent can be added to the batter and transferred to a can. In an embodiment of the present invention, a can or container can be sealed and pressurized with a mixture of water soluble and non water-soluble gasses. In an embodiment of the present invention, the pressurized gasses are a mixture of N.sub.2 and CO.sub.2. In an alternative embodiment of the invention, the pressurized gas is 100% CO.sub.2. In an embodiment of the present invention, the antibacterial agent can be cultured dextrose. In an alternative embodiment of the invention, the antibacterial agent is sodium lactate. In various embodiments of the present invention, the ingredients include a browning agent which is used to control the appearance and texture of the product. In various embodiments of the present invention, the ingredients enable freezing and thawing of the product without phase separations. In various embodiments of the present invention, a browning agent is used which is compatible with the cold process and pressurized can application of the product. In various embodiments of the present invention, the ingredients used to allow freezing and thawing are compatible with one or more of the browning agent, the cold process preservation process and the pressurized can application of the product. A dispenser suitable for use in storing and dispensing the batter provided therein is well known in the industry and to consumers alike, and includes a spout, which releases pressurized contents when an individual depresses the spout to expend the contents of the can. There are numerous variations on the shape and type of dispenser, suitable for use with the present invention. The inventors have empirically determined that providing a refrigeration-stable, bakable batter in a pressurized can, using the specified gas and pressure combinations set forth herein, produces a superior quality baked good when the product is cooked in a manner similar to current dry mix products stored in boxes or bags.

[0015] The mix recipe can be used to create pancakes (single sided grilling) or waffles (double sided, patterned grilling). The resultant product yields fluffy pancakes and light crisp waffles. In an embodiment of the present invention, the fluffy nature of the pancakes can be a result of the partial pressures of the gasses used to pressurize the can. In an embodiment of the present invention, the fluffy nature of the pancakes can be a result of the partial pressure of the water soluble gasses used to pressurize the can. In an embodiment of the present invention, the fluffy nature of the pancakes can be a result of the incorporation of the water-soluble gas into the batter mix. In an embodiment of the present invention, the fluffy nature of the pancakes can be a result of the ratio of the water to batter mix.

[0016] In an embodiment of the present invention, FIG. 1 shows a flow chart for assembling a charged batter-filled food in a pressurized container. Generally, the batter recipe will be blended at step 10, mixed with water and preservatives at step 12, inserted into a pressurized sealable container at step 14, the container sealed at step 16, and the container pressurized in accordance with well-known techniques at step 18. In an embodiment of the present invention, steps 10-14 are carried out in an inert atmosphere. In an embodiment of the present invention, steps 10-14 are carried out at between 32-48.degree. F. In an alternative embodiment of the present invention, steps 12-14 are carried out at between 38-44.degree. F.

[0017] In an embodiment of the present invention, the ingredients of the mix include wheat flour, sugar, nonfat dry milk, whole dried egg, salt, sodium bicarbonate, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, xanthan gum, cultured dextrose and water. This recipe is mixed by blending all the dry ingredients, adding water at approximately 1.degree. C. (34.degree. F.) to the cultured dextrose and then this solution to the dry blend in an appropriate amount (set forth below) depending on the desired batter product while keeping the temperature of the batter below approximately 4.degree. C. (40.degree. F.). The batter can be stored in an inert atmosphere while being transferred to piston fillers used to dispense the batter into the aerosol line for filling the pressurized cans.

[0018] In an alternative embodiment of the invention, the ingredients are certified organic. The organic ingredients of the mix include wheat flour, sugar, whole dried egg, powdered soy, salt, sodium bicarbonate, dicalcium phosphate dehydrate, sodium lactate and water. This recipe is mixed by blending all the dry ingredients, adding water at approximately 1.degree. C. (34.degree. F.) to the sodium lactate and then this solution to the dry blend in an appropriate amount (set forth below) depending on the desired batter product while keeping the temperature of the batter below approximately 4.degree. C. (41.degree. F.). The batter can be stored in an inert atmosphere while being transferred to piston fillers used to dispense the batter into the aerosol line for filling the pressurized cans.

[0019] In an embodiment of the present invention, the pressurized gas (100% CO.sub.2) is used as a preservative of the ingredients stored in the can. In an embodiment of the present invention, sodium lactate can be used as a preservative of the ingredients stored in the can. In an embodiment of the present invention, the pressurized gas (100% CO.sub.2) and sodium lactate can be used as preservatives of the ingredients stored in the can. In an alternative embodiment of the present invention, sorbic acid can be used as a preservative of the ingredients stored in the can. In an embodiment of the present invention, potassium sorbate can be used as a preservative of the ingredients stored in the can. In an embodiment of the present invention, propionic acid can be used as a preservative of the ingredients stored in the can.

[0020] In an embodiment of the present invention, the mix utilized for the present invention can be a specially blended mix. In an embodiment of the present invention, the mix utilized for the present invention can be an organic batter blended mix. In an embodiment of the present invention, the product produced with an organic batter blended mix can be an organic product. In an embodiment of the present invention, other dry mix can be utilized for the present invention. In an embodiment of the present invention, other dry-mix products can be utilized with the present invention. In an embodiment of the present invention, the dry mix can be activated by a combination of water, milk or other fluids.

[0021] Table 1.0 outlines the breakdown of the total calories in a 100 g (3.53 oz.) serving of the mixed pancake batter.

TABLE-US-00001 TABLE 1.0 Nutritional Analysis per 100 g Calories 130 cal Fat Calories 10 cal Sat Fat Calories 0 cal Total Fat 1 g Saturated Fat 0 g Stearic Acid 0 g Trans Fatty Acids 0 g Polyunsaturated Fat 0 g Omega 6 0 g Omega 3 0 g Monounsaturated Fat 0 g Cholesterol 15 mg Sodium 160 mg Potassium 0 g Total Carbohydrate 28 g Dietary Fiber 4 g Soluble Fiber 0 g Insoluble Fiber 0 g Sugars 4 g Sugar Alcohol 0 g Other Carbohydrate 20 g Protein 4 g Vitamin A 0% DV Vitamin A (RE) RE Vitamin C 0% DV Calcium 2% DV Iron 10% DV Vitamin D 0% DV Vitamin E 0% DV Vitamin K 0% DV Thiamin 0% DV Riboflavin 0% DV Niacin 0% DV Vitamin B6 0% DV Folate 0% DV Vitamin B12 0% DV Biotin 0% DV Pantothenic Acid 0% DV Phosphorous 0% DV Iodine 0% DV Magnesium 0% DV Selenium 0% DV Copper 0% DV Manganese 0% DV Chromium 0% DV Molybdenum 0% DV Chloride 0% DV

Processing Procedure

[0022] In an embodiment of the present invention, a dry mixing vessel can be used to blend all the ingredients. In an embodiment of the present invention, water at approximately 1.degree. C. (34.degree. F.) can be added to the dry mix. In an embodiment of the present invention, the batter can be blended for approximately 5 to 7 minutes on a high sheer mixer. In an embodiment of the present invention, the batter can be blended until smooth without lumps on a high sheer mixer. In an embodiment of the present invention, the batter can be blended at less than 4.degree. C. (40.degree. F.) on a high sheer mixer. In an embodiment of the present invention, the batter can be stored in an inert atmosphere directly after mixing until being loaded in pressurized cans. In an embodiment of the present invention, the batter can be stored under nitrogen to prevent the sodium bicarbonate reaction for early leavening. In an embodiment of the invention, the batter is not stored under nitrogen because the sodium bicarbonate is encapsulated. Encapsulated sodium bicarbonate does not release until it reaches 58-61.degree. C. (136-142.degree. F.) directly after mixing and before being loaded in the pressurized cans. In an embodiment of the present invention, the batter can be pumped to piston fillers on an aerosol line prior to being loaded in the pressurized cans.

Cold Process Procedure

[0023] In an embodiment of the present invention, the blending of the ingredients can be carried out in a refrigerated production room. In an embodiment of the present invention, the blending of the water and the dry ingredients can be carried out in a chilled production room. In an embodiment of the present invention, the blending of the water and the dry ingredients can be carried out with refrigerated production equipment. In an embodiment of the present invention, the blending of the water and the dry ingredients can be carried out with refrigerated production equipment in a refrigerated production room. In an embodiment of the present invention, the batter temperature can be controlled to not exceed approximately 10.degree. C. (50.degree. F.). In an alternative embodiment of the present invention, the batter temperature can be controlled to not exceed approximately 4.degree. C. (40.degree. F.). In an embodiment of the present invention, in a jacketed mixing tank the water coolant can be introduced at approximately 1.+-.2.degree. C. (34.+-.2.degree. F.). In an embodiment of the present invention, full scrape mix agitator can be utilized in mixing the ingredients. In an embodiment of the present invention, high shear cage agitator can be utilized in mixing the ingredients. In an embodiment of the present invention, the dry blend of ingredients can be slowly pumped into the mixing vessel with slow agitation for approximately 10 minutes. In an embodiment of the present invention, batter can be mixed for approximately 5 to 7 minutes on high shear speed, where the batter temperature is not allowed to exceed approximately 4.degree. C. (40.degree. F.).

[0024] In an embodiment of the present invention, cultured dextrose (0.10-3.00%) can be added to the water to be mixed with the dry ingredients. In an embodiment of the present sodium lactate (below approximately 1%) can be added to the water prior to agitation with the dry mix to minimize `off-flavor`. In an embodiment of the present invention, cultured dextrose (greater than approximately 0.5%) can be added to the water prior to agitation with the dry mix to insure 120 day refrigerated `shelf life`. In an embodiment of the present invention, cultured dextrose (0.50-1.00%) can be added to the water prior to agitation with the dry mix. In an alternative embodiment of the present invention, sodium lactate and carbon dioxide can be added to the batter prepared with the cold process to a insure 120 day refrigerated `shelf life`.

[0025] In various embodiment of the present invention, the water ranges from approximately 20% to approximately 80% of the dry batter weight (on a % by weight basis) for waffles, pancakes, muffins, cup cakes, and ginger bread, cookies and brownies formulations. In an embodiment of the present invention, a cookie mix can be made by mixing approximately 20% water with approximately 80% dry mix. In an embodiment of the present invention, a brownie mix can be made by mixing approximately 30% water with approximately 70% dry mix. In an embodiment of the present invention, a cup cake mix can be made by mixing approximately 30% water with approximately 70% dry mix. In an embodiment of the present invention, a pancake mix can be made by mixing approximately 50% water with approximately 50% dry mix. In an embodiment of the present invention, a waffle mix can be made by mixing approximately 60% water with approximately 40% dry mix. In an embodiment of the present invention, a moose mix can be made by mixing approximately 80% water with approximately 20% dry mix. In an alternative embodiment of the present invention, the water can be 43% by weight of the mix for waffles, pancakes, muffins, cup cakes, ginger bread, cookies and brownies.

[0026] In various embodiments of the invention, the ratio of water to dry mix varies depending on the nature of the dry mix. All-purpose flour has lower levels of gluten and as a result requires less water. In contrast, pastry flour has higher levels of gluten, which requires more water to generate the same consistency mix. In an embodiment of the present invention, the water is 60% by weight for waffles using an `organic` batter mix. In an embodiment of the present invention, the water is 40% by weight for waffles using a non-organic dry mix containing all-purpose flour.

[0027] In an embodiment of the present invention, the water varies depending on the required consistency of the product. In an embodiment of the present invention, a pancake mix can be made by mixing approximately 50% water with approximately 50% dry mix. In an embodiment of the present invention, the pancake mix can vary between 40.5-52.5% by weight water depending on the required consistency. In an embodiment of the invention, one mix can be used for both waffles and pancakes.

[0028] In an embodiment of the present invention, the dry mix ingredients are greater than 95% organic. In an embodiment of the invention, there are no available substitute organic ingredients for the non-organic ingredients in the dry mix. In an embodiment of the invention, where the dry mix ingredients are greater than 95% organic and there are no available substitute organic ingredients for the non-organic ingredients, the food product can be certified as organic.

[0029] In an embodiment of the present invention, an amount of sorbic acid can be used to adjust the pH of the batter mix. In an embodiment of the present invention, an amount of potassium sorbate can be used to adjust the pH of the batter mix. In an embodiment of the present invention, the inclusion of one or more ingredients to control the pH in the batter provides a stable product, requiring refrigeration at approximately 4.+-.2.degree. C. (40.+-.2.degree. F.). In an embodiment of the present invention, the water to be added to the dry mix can be provided with approximately 0.1% potassium sorbate and approximately 0.05% sorbic acid (by weight).

[0030] In an embodiment of the present invention, an amount of potassium sorbate controls the growth of yeast and mold to keep the product stable. In an embodiment of the present invention, sodium lactate controls the growth of yeast, mold lactic acid and Listeria to keep the product stable. In an embodiment of the present invention, an amount of cultured dextrose controls the growth of yeast and mold to keep the product stable. In an embodiment of the present invention, the inclusion of one or more ingredients to control the growth of mold and bacteria in the batter provides a stable product, requiring refrigeration at approximately 4.+-.2.degree. C. (40.+-.2.degree. F.).

[0031] In an embodiment of the present invention, batter can be pumped to a jacketed holding vessel, where the batter temperature is not allowed to exceed 4.+-.2.degree. C. (40.+-.2.degree. F.). In an embodiment of the present invention, batter can be pumped to a series of filling heads. In an embodiment of the present invention, sanitized lined cans can be introduced to the series of filling heads and filled with the batter. In an embodiment of the present invention, cans can be valved with tilt valve 2.times.0.0022 or vertical action valve 2.times.0.033.times.0.090 valves and the cans can be crimped and gassed to approximately 150.+-.3 psi. Cans can be tipped, capped, packed and stored in cold storage at 4.+-.2.degree. C. (40.+-.2.degree. F.).

[0032] In various embodiments of the present invention, different baking products including waffles, pancakes, muffins, cup cakes, ginger bread, cookies and brownies are formulated using the cold process into a ready to use pressurized can and dispensed directly into the cooking apparatus.

[0033] The pressurizing step provides with different mixtures of a pressurized gas, depending on the particular application for the batter in the can. If the batter is to be used as a waffle mix, the gas can be nitrogen (N.sub.2) and carbon dioxide (C0.sub.2) mixed in a ratio of approximately 10% N.sub.2 and approximately 90% C0.sub.2 by weight, pressurized at 150 pounds per square inch (psi). For a pancake mix, the gas can be N.sub.2 and C0.sub.2 mixed in a ratio of approximately 50% each gas by weight. For a cup cake mix, the gas can be N.sub.2 and C0.sub.2 mixed in a ratio of approximately 55% N.sub.2 and approximately 45% C0.sub.2 by weight. For a brownie mix, the gas can be N.sub.2 and C0.sub.2 mixed in a ratio of approximately 85% N.sub.2 and approximately 15% C0.sub.2 by weight.

[0034] In an alternative embodiment of the invention, if the batter is to be used as a waffle mix, the gas can be 100% carbon dioxide (C0.sub.2), pressurized at 150 pounds per square inch (psi). See Table 14.2 for the weight of gas added in the can.

[0035] Different batter mixtures require various pressurizing reagents and compositions in order to provide the optimal consistency for baking of the food product. For example, the batter in a gas container can be pressurized with carbon dioxide (C0.sub.2). C0.sub.2 is a water miscible or soluble gas. After sealing the can, the pressure drops considerably (up to approximately 40%) after canning because the CO.sub.2 dissolves into the mixed batter in the can. For a waffle mix where the gas is 90% C0.sub.2 this can have a significant impact on the final pressure. For a pancake mix, the gas composition can include both nitrogen (N.sub.2) and C0.sub.2. In contrast, to C0.sub.2, N.sub.2 is largely a non water-soluble gas. When N.sub.2 and C0.sub.2 are mixed in a ratio range of approximately 90% nitrogen and approximately 10% carbon dioxide to approximately 80% nitrogen and approximately 20% carbon dioxide, the N.sub.2 will not be significantly absorbed by the batter mix, and the resulting total pressure can remain higher. By having approximately 10% to approximately 20% of the gas as C0.sub.2, this combination gives sufficient gas emulsification of the batter to generate a light and fluffy pancake or waffle, while maintaining sufficient gas pressure for the entire life of the can. Gas composition and ratios for muffins are similar to waffles. Gas compositions and ratios for ginger bread, cookies and brownies formulations are similar to pancakes.

[0036] The foregoing detailed description of the invention has been presented for purposes of illustration and description. It is not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the precise form disclosed. Many modifications and variations are possible in light of the above teaching. The described embodiments were chosen in order to best explain the principles of the invention and its practical application to thereby enable others skilled in the art to best utilize the invention in various embodiments and with various modifications as are suited to the particular use contemplated. It is intended that the scope of the invention be defined by the claims appended hereto.

[0037] A bakable food product is any food product which requires heating prior to serving. Bakable includes processes such as frying, poaching, grilling, bar-b-q-ing, heating in a waffle iron, heating in a sandwich maker, heating in a boiler, heating in a conventional oven, heating in a gas convection oven, heating in a microwave oven and heating in a toaster.

Example 1

[0038] Aim: to determine an acceptable pancake powder mix to water ratio; and determine suitable propellant(s) to make an aerosol packaged pancake batter.

[0039] Mix: 50/50 Elite Spice Pancake Mix/DI Water (.about.50.degree. C.; .about.120.degree. F.); Preservatives (0.05% Potassium sorbate and 0.05% sorbic acid); Fill: 16 oz; Can: 214.times.804, 3-piece, lined; Propellants Tested:

(i) 5 g Carbon Dioxide (CO.sub.2), (ii) 2.8 g Nitrogen (N.sub.2)

TABLE-US-00002 [0040] TABLE 1.1 Cook Test Results on the Aerosol Packaged Batter Amount Dispensed, g Appearance of Pancakes Samples gassed with 5.0 g CO.sub.2 32 thinner pancakes Samples gassed with 2.8 g N.sub.2 58 thicker, "sponge-like" pancakes

[0041] Although different amounts of batter were dispensed with the different propellants (see Tables 1.1 and 1.2), the samples made similar diameter pancakes. This is due to the CO.sub.2 dissolved (in water) in the CO.sub.2 sample that gave the batter more volume.

TABLE-US-00003 TABLE 1.2 Spray Rates of Aerosol Packaged Batter Pressure after 17 Spray days, psi Rate, g/s Samples gassed with 5.0 g CO.sub.2 45 psi 10.8 Samples gassed with 2.8 g N.sub.2 95 psi 12.0

[0042] Initial tests showed that the ratio of 50/50 Elite Spice powder mix-to-water ratio made a batter that produced good pancakes and waffles. The consistency was typical of a pancake batter.

[0043] These samples were used to cook pancakes and waffles (using waffle iron). The sample gassed with CO.sub.2 was more suitable to make waffles. The waffles produced were light and crispy. Because CO.sub.2 is more soluble in water than N.sub.2, the batter dispensed from the CO.sub.2-gassed sample had dissolved CO.sub.2 in it. When cooked in the waffle iron, the CO.sub.2 escaped making the waffle light, thin and crispy. When this sample was used to make pancakes, the dissolved CO.sub.2 escaped the batter during the cooking process making the pancakes flat and thin. The sample gassed with N.sub.2 made better pancakes than the one gassed with CO.sub.2. The N.sub.2 pressurized the can, but did not really get absorbed or mixed in the water/batter. The batter dispensed was therefore denser and made thicker, sponge-like pancakes similar in appearance and texture to normal pancakes. When this sample was used to cook waffles, the waffles produced were thicker and denser. The test candidate preferred the thin and crispy waffles over the denser ones. On the other hand, they preferred the denser pancakes over the thin and flat ones. Summary of trial: samples gassed with CO.sub.2 made good waffles; samples gassed with N.sub.2 made good pancakes.

Example 2

[0044] Aim: to fine-tune the powder mix-to-water ratio and the amount of compressed gas to be used as propellant.

[0045] The following samples were prepared: (i) 50 powder mix/50 water; in 214.times.804 can; filled at 16 oz; gassed with 3.9 g N.sub.2 at 130 psi; (ii) 45 powder mix/55 water; in 205.times.604 can; filled at 4 oz; gassed with 2.7 g N.sub.2 at 130 psi; and (iii) 40 powder mix/60 water; in 214.times.804 can; filled at 12 oz; gassed with 4.6 N.sub.2 at 130 psi. Additionally, the following samples were prepared for test candidate testing: (iv) 50 powder mix/50 water; gassed with CO.sub.2; (v) 47.5 powder mix/52.5 water; gassed with N.sub.2.

[0046] Results: As in Example 1, sample (iv) that was 50/50 and gassed with CO.sub.2 made thin, light and crispy waffles. Sample (v), that was 47.5% powder mix and 52.5% water was found to be less dense than sample (iv) and was easier to mix. Sample (v) also flowed faster and easier from the can gassed with N.sub.2 and still made pancakes with attractive appearance, taste and texture. The quality of the pancake was comparable to sample (i) where the 50/50 formula was gassed with N.sub.2. Test candidate test result: sample (iv) 50/50 with CO.sub.2--good for waffles; sample (v) 47.5/52.5 with N.sub.2--good for pancakes.

TABLE-US-00004 TABLE 2.1 Cook Test Results on N.sub.2-Pressured Pancake Batter with Varying Powder Mix-to-Water Ratio. Powder Mix-to- Water ratio Can Fill, oz Propellant Results 50/50 214 .times. 804 16 3.9 g N.sub.2 gassed batter was dense; the at 130 psi pancakes were sponge- like as typical pancakes 45/55 205 .times. 604 4 2.7 g N.sub.2 gassed batter was less dense; at 130 psi cooked pancakes looked like typical pancakes (sponge-like with bigger air pockets) 40/60 214 .times. 804 12 4.6 g N.sub.2 gassed batter was thin and runny at 130 psi

Example 3

[0047] Aim: to conduct preliminary tests on different preservatives.

[0048] Mix: Pancake Batter: 47.5/52.7 Elite Spice Pancake Mix/DI Water. Screw cap glass vials. Primary Preservatives used: (i) 0.05% Sorbic Acid and 0.10% Potassium Sorbate; (ii) 0.10% Sorbic Acid and 0.20% Potassium Sorbate. Additional preservatives: EDTA, Sodium Benzoate, Methyl Paraben, Propyl Paraben and Lactic Acid All the samples were aseptically prepared. One set of vials were capped with N.sub.2 and one set was not. All the vials were stored in the dark at room temperature for 1 week.

[0049] Results: The evaluation of the samples was limited to visual and olfactory testing. Based on these results, no preservative was suitable for the required batter applications. The results were almost identical in all the samples regardless of the preservative system used. All samples showed signs of phase separation, pressure built up and a sour odor was detected after a week. The phase separation was expected in such suspension with high level of water insoluble solids. The batter mixture can require an emulsifier or a suspending agent. The pressure build-up can have been due to: generation of CO.sub.2 from bicarbonate leavening agent and/or microbial growth and/or possible fermentation. The souring of odor could have been due to fermentation or other microbial growth. The microorganisms can have come from powder mix.

TABLE-US-00005 TABLE 3.1 Preservative Test Results on Pancake Batter in Glass Vials with 0.05% Sorbic Acid and 0.10% Potassium Sorbate After 1 Week Additional Preservatives Air Headspace N.sub.2 Headspace None no phase separation phase separation pressure build-up pressure build-up sour milk odor sour milk odor 200 ppm EDTA beginning of phase phase separation separation pressure build-up pressure build-up sour milk odor sour milk odor 500 ppm EDTA no phase separation phase separation pressure build-up pressure build-up sour milk odor sour milk odor 0.10% Na Benzoate beginning of phase phase separation separation pressure build-up pressure build-up sour milk odor sour milk odor 0.025% Methyl beginning of phase beginning of phase separation Paraben separation pressure build-up 0.075% Propyl pressure build-up sour milk odor masked by Paraben sour milk odor paraben odor 0.50% Lactic Acid phase separation phase separation pressure build-up pressure build-up sour milk odor sour milk, rancid, off odor 1.00% Lactic Acid phase separation beginning of phase separation pressure build-up pressure build-up sour milk odor sour milk odor

TABLE-US-00006 TABLE 3.2 Preservative Test Results on Pancake Batter in Glass Vials with 0.10% Sorbic Acid and 0.20% Potassium Sorbate After 170 Hrs. Additional Preservatives Air Headspace N.sub.2 Headspace None beginning of phase separation phase separation pressure build-up pressure build-up sour milk odor sour milk odor 200 ppm EDTA beginning of phase separation phase separation pressure build-up pressure build-up sour milk odor sour milk odor 500 ppm EDTA no phase separation beginning of phase pressure build-up separation sour milk odor pressure build-up sour milk odor 0.10% Na Benzoate beginning of phase separation phase separation pressure build-up pressure build-up sour milk odor sour milk odor 0.025% Methyl phase separation no phase separation Paraben pressure build-up pressure build-up 0.075% Propyl sour milk odor masked by sour milk odor Paraben paraben odor masked by paraben odor 0.50% Lactic Acid phase separation phase separation pressure build-up pressure build-up sour milk odor sour milk odor 1.00% Lactic Acid phase separation beginning of phase pressure build-up separation no off odor pressure build-up sour milk odor Note: Pressure build-up was characterized by an audible pressure exhaust when the vial cap was unscrewed.

Example 4

[0050] Aim: to study the pressure build-up in pressurized and un-pressurized cans.

[0051] Propellants: (i) None; (ii) CO.sub.2; (iii) N.sub.2. Fill: 8 oz. Hot process, 50.degree. C. (120.degree. F.) DI water+Elite Spice pancake mix. Preservative trials:

1. Un-pressurized crimped 205.times.604 3-pc steel, EP coated cans with a. 0.05% Sorbic Acid and 0.10% Potassium Sorbate combo b. 0.05% Sorbic Acid and 0.10% Potassium Sorbate combo with N2 cap c. 0.05% Sorbic Acid and 0.10% Potassium Sorbate combo+1.00% lactic acid (88%) d. 5% Sorbic Acid and 0.10% Potassium Sorbate combo+1.00% lactic acid (88%) with N2 cap 2. Pressurized crimped 205.times.604 3-pc steel, EP coated cans with a. 1.0% Sorbates (combination of 0.40% Sorbic Acid and 0.60% Potassium Sorbate) b. a+200 ppm EDTA c. a+500 ppm EDTA d. a+0.1% Sodium Benzoate e. a+0.075% Propyl Paraben+0.025% Methyl Paraben f. a+0.5% Lactic Acid (88%) g. a+1.0% Lactic Acid (88%)

[0052] Results: There was a significant pressure build-up in both un-pressurized samples (Dots--0.15% Sorbates, no N.sub.2 Cap; Horizontal Lines--0.15% Sorbates, 1.0% Lactic acid, no N.sub.2 Cap) and N.sub.2-pressurized samples (Vertical Lines--0.15% Sorbates, N.sub.2 Cap; Black--0.15% Sorbates, 1.0% Lactic acid, N.sub.2 Cap) after 60 days. On the contrary, CO.sub.2-pressurized samples dropped in pressure in the same time frame (Tables 4.1 and 4.2 and FIG. 3). The pressure build-up was more pronounced in the un-pressurized samples (FIG. 2; .about.40 psi average after 60 days) than in the N.sub.2-pressurized samples (.about.13 psi average after 60 days) (FIG. 4). And for the un-pressurized set, the samples with sorbates only (Dots--0.15% Sorbates, no N.sub.2 Cap) result in more than double the final pressure compared to the sample with sorbates+lactic acid preservative system (Horizontal Lines--0.15% Sorbates, 1.0% Lactic acid, no N.sub.2 Cap) (FIG. 2).

[0053] For the samples pressurized with CO.sub.2 (Dots--1.0% Sorbates; Vertical Lines--1.0% Sorbates, 200 ppm EDTA; Horizontal Lines--1.0% Sorbates, 500 ppm EDTA; Diagonal Stripes LtoR--1.0% Sorbates, 0.1% Sodium benzoate; Black--1.0% Sorbates, 0.075% Propyl Paraben, 0.025% Methyl Paraben; Diagonal Stripes RtoL--1.0% Sorbates, 0.5% Lactic acid; White--1.0% Sorbates, 1.0% Lactic acid), the average pressure drop after 60 days was about 29 psi (FIG. 3)

[0054] As discussed in Example 3, the probable causes for the build up of pressure in the un-pressurized and N.sub.2 pressurized cans can have been (i) evolution of CO.sub.2 from the bicarbonate leavening agent and/or (ii) microbial growth/fermentation.

[0055] In fermentation of sugars, one of the ingredients of the powder mix, the byproducts are ethanol and CO.sub.2. Some of the CO.sub.2 is released to the headspace of the can. However, a portion of the CO.sub.2 is dissolved in the water which, in effect, acidifies the batter. Additionally, other microorganisms such as lactic acid bacteria which can possibly be present in the mix (see Example 6), can produce acid byproducts such as lactic acid. Such byproducts can cause the batter to acidify. This acidification can then caused the sodium bicarbonate to release further CO.sub.2.

[0056] The CO.sub.2 due to microbial activity or bicarbonate decomposition in the un-pressurized cans produced the headspace pressure (FIG. 2). But when the headspace of the can already had a positive pressure as in the N.sub.2 pressurized samples (Dots--1.0% Sorbates; Vertical Lines--1.0% Sorbates, 200 ppm EDTA; Horizontal Lines--1.0% Sorbates, 500 ppm EDTA; Diagonal Stripes LtoR--1.0% Sorbates, 0.1% Sodium benzoate; Black--1.0% Sorbates, 0.075% Propyl Paraben, 0.025% Methyl Paraben; Diagonal Stripes RtoL--1.0% Sorbates, 0.5% Lactic acid; White--1.0% Sorbates, 1.0% Lactic acid) (FIG. 4), the production of CO.sub.2 can have been restricted such that the pressure-build up was less than that in the un-pressurized samples.

[0057] On the other hand, un-pressurized and N.sub.2-pressurized samples preserved with sorbates combined with lactic acid had the least pressure build-up. And the more lactic acid added, the lower the pressure build-up (FIGS. 2 and 4). Although the lactic acid efficacy cannot completely offset the bicarbonate decomposition due to acidity, it was significantly better as a preservative, in combination with sorbates, than the other preservative systems used.

[0058] The CO.sub.2-pressurized cans exhibited reversed results and the pressure decreased after 60 days (FIG. 3). One explanation is that some of the CO.sub.2 molecules that were injected in the can were dissolved in the water in the mix over time. This explains why the pressure decreased from the day the samples were made. The CO.sub.2 generation in these samples cannot have been enough to overcome the amount of CO.sub.2 dissolved in the sample. Therefore, the pressure effects of CO.sub.2 dissolution were more evident than the effects of CO.sub.2 generation. Alternatively, the CO.sub.2 can have natural anti-microbial action which impeded or slowed down microorganism growth. For fermentation, the CO.sub.2 injected can have saturated the system retarding further CO.sub.2 production from yeast. For aerobic microorganisms, CO.sub.2 made the environment undesirable for microbial growth.

TABLE-US-00007 TABLE 4.1 Pressure Build-up in Un-Pressurized Cans Can Pressure, psi Preservative System N.sub.2 Cap 12 Hrs 48 Hrs 1440 Hrs 0.15% Sorbates no 0.5-1.0 ~1.0 37 0.15% Sorbates yes ~1.0 ~1.0 42 0.15% Sorbates + 1.00% no ~1.0 ~2.0 16 Lactic Acid 0.15% Sorbates + 1.00% yes ~1.0 ~2.0 16 Lactic Acid

TABLE-US-00008 TABLE 4.2 Pressure Changes in Pressurized Cans Pressure, psi 0 Hrs 72 Hrs 1440 Hrs Preservative CO.sub.2- N.sub.2- CO.sub.2- N.sub.2- CO.sub.2- N.sub.2- System pressurized* pressurized* pressurized pressurized pressurized pressurized 1.0% Sorbates** 126 107 115 109 100 121 1.0% Sorbates + 120 105 111 106 96 120 200 ppm EDTA 1.0% Sorbates + 118 112 109 112 87 126 500 ppm EDTA 1.0% Sorbates + 122 107 112 107 93 122 0.10% Na Benzoate 1.0% Sorbates + 122 107 112 107 89 120 0.075% Propyl Paraben + 0.025% Methyl Paraben 1.0% Sorbates + 121 107 112 107 92 117 0.5% Lactic Acid 1.0% Sorbates + 122 105 114 106 91** 111 1.0% Lactic Acid *Amount of propellant used: ~3.30 g CO.sub.2 and ~1.70 g N.sub.2 **1.0% Sorbates is a combination of 0.4% Sorbic Acid and 0.6% Potassium Sorbate

Example 5

[0059] Aim: to study the pressure changes in the can pressurized with 50/50 CO.sub.2/N.sub.2 as a follow-up to Example 4.

TABLE-US-00009 TABLE 5.1 Sample* Description for the Pressure Build-Up test on Cans Pressurized with 50/50 CO.sub.2/N.sub.2 Combo. Sample Code Formula Propellant Fill, oz 06-023 Waffle formula (50/50 CO.sub.2/N.sub.2) 18 50.0% Water 2 g CO.sub.2 followed with 49.5% Elite Spice powder 2 g N.sub.2 @ ~120 psi mix (lot 2-27601) Total 4 g 0.5% Guardian CS1-50 (cultured dextrose) 06-024 Pancake formula (50/50 CO.sub.2/N.sub.2) 18 52.5% Water 2 g CO.sub.2 followed with 47.0% Elite Spice powder 2 g N.sub.2 @ ~120 psi mix (lot 2-27601) Total 4 g 0.5% Guardian CS1-50 *Samples were stored at room temp for the duration of the study.

TABLE-US-00010 TABLE 5.2 Pressure Changes in Cans Pressurized with 50/50 CO.sub.2/N.sub.2 Combo Sample Pressure, psi Code 2 Hrs 72 Hrs 264 Hrs 400 Hrs 1700 Hrs Pressure 06-023 110 109 109 109 121 +11 06-024 109 108 107 107 118 +9 *For Time 0, the pressure reading was taken ~2 to 3 hours after the samples were made

[0060] Results: The pressure build up was similar to the N.sub.2-pressurized samples in Example 4 (see FIG. 4.6), but the amount of product in the cans was increased in this trial. Some of the injected CO.sub.2 dissolved in the water but more CO.sub.2 (or other gaseous microorganism byproducts) can be generated, causing the pressure increase.

Example 6

[0061] Aim: to determine the shelf stability of the batter using trial preservatives. The tests were conducted by BETA Food Consulting, Inc.

[0062] Mix: Pancake Batter: 47.5/52.7 Elite Spice Pancake Mix/DI Water. Screw cap glass vials. Primary Preservatives used: MG510 gassed with CO.sub.2; CS1-50 gassed with CO.sub.2; MG510 gassed with N.sub.2; CS1-50 gassed with N.sub.2.

TABLE-US-00011 TABLE 6.1 Parameters of the micro-study Batch 2 (Pancake) 47.5/52.5 Batch 1 (Pancake) Elite Spice 50/50 Elite powder Spice powder mix/Water mix/Water Preservative (Cultured Microgard 510 (MG510) Guardian CS1-50 Dextrose Maltodextrin) (lot# 510-425301) (lot# FS-102) Preservative Dosage 0.75% 0.50% Fill 18.3 oz 18.3 oz Can 214 .times. 804 214 .times. 804 Temp of finished batch 65.degree. F. 55.degree. F. Nitrogen cap no yes Codes V1, V3 V2, V4 Inoculants: Y--yeast; LAB--lactic acid bacteria; SA--Staphilococcus Aureus; LM--Lysteria Monocytogenes; BC--Bacillus Cereus.

[0063] Results: Following is a study conducting a microbiological challenge on aerosolized food product. The pH of the aerosol food product is approximately 6.0 and the water activity is 0.96. Growth of Selected Spoilage and Pathogenic Organisms in an Aerosol Food Product

[0064] Purpose: The purpose of the study is to determine the fate of selected spoilage and surrogates for pathogenic microbial agents when inoculated into an aerosolized food product. Outgrowth of lactic acid bacteria and Listeria monocytogenes was problematic in a previous study completed in January, 2006. For this reason, they will be the only organisms studied on this formulation. A surrogate organism that is non-pathogenic will be used for L. monocytogenes to avoid the potential for contamination of your new facility. Listeria innocua will be used instead.

[0065] Product Variables: The product variables to be studied include: 1) MicroGard 510 with CO.sub.2 (waffle); 2) MicroGard CS150 with CO.sub.2 (waffle); 3) MicroGard 510 with N.sub.2 (pancake); and 4) MicroGard CS150 with N.sub.2 (pancake).

[0066] The intended shelf life is 45-60 days, minimum. No previous stability information had been gathered on the products. The study was continued for 105 days to determine whether a longer shelf life was possible.

[0067] Process: The pre-cooled batter was loaded into the cans after filling to minimize shifts in microbial loads. Empty cans were submerged in a 200 ppm chlorine solution for a minimum of 60 seconds prior to draining and permitting to air dry, for the purpose of disinfection. Cans were filled, inoculated, capped with valve tops and pressurized, chilled in an ice bath, and immediately placed into refrigeration temperatures of 40.degree. C. (41.degree. F.). Finished cans were stored for 1.5 days and transported in a refrigerated truck.

[0068] Organisms: The organisms for challenge represented those of potential safety and spoilage concern. The only pathogen of potential concern that was not represented was C. botulinum. The test organism categories included: Bacillus cereus (gram positive spore former, thermo labile toxin); Staphylococcus aureus (gram positive non-spore former, thermo stable toxin); Listeria monocytogenes (gram positive non-spore former, psychrotroph); Zygosaccharomyces rouxii (yeast); Lactobacillus formentum; and Lactobacillus plantarum (combined inoculum of gram positive non-spore formers).

[0069] Culture Preparation: Lactic acid bacteria was grown in sterile MRS broth. Other bacteria were grown in sterile trypticase soy broth. Yeast extract was added for the L. monocytogenes culture Bacteria were cultured for 24 hours at 35 C, then streaked on trypticase soy agar and incubated for 48 hours at 35.degree. C. Yeast were cultured for 5 days at 24.degree. C. on potato dextrose agar. Cell suspensions were prepared by harvesting cells into sterile 0.1% peptone water. Inoculum was adjusted to deliver a target initial load of 103-104 cfu/g (minimum 590,000 cfu/can in each 20 fl. oz. can). Inoculation was delivered with a 1 mL inoculum volume. The cans were inoculated in the `in-house` R & D laboratory bench top capping unit at Follmer Development, located away from the processing area and not used for production. A Food Safety Solutions representative conducted the inoculation.

[0070] Sixteen cans for each inoculum group were prepared. Two uninoculated controls were additionally prepared for each of the 4 product variables. Swabs of the bench, utensils, and rinsate from the filler unit were collected after cleaning and sanitization was complete to determine adequacy of cleaning. The unit was not be used before results were available.

[0071] Test Method: Test methods for quantitation will be per FDA-BAM or AOAC. The changes in loads for each inoculum group will be measured at each test interval. Testing will be done in duplicate. Trend information about growth, death, or stasis will be available from the data.

[0072] Test Interval: Test intervals were spaced appropriately to represent the 105 day storage period. Testing was conducted on inoculated variables 1, 2, and 4 at day 2, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, and 105. Testing for inoculated variable 3 was conducted at day 2, 15, 30, and 45. Later test intervals for variable 3 were discontinued because inoculum loads significantly increased. Uninoculated controls were analyzed after 2 and 105 for variables 1 and 2. An additional 45 day test interval was added for variables 3 and 4 to determine midpoint shifts in background flora levels.

[0073] Uninoculated control samples were analyzed for B. cereus, S. aureus, L. monocytogenes, lactic acid bacteria, yeast, mesophilic aerobic plate count, and mesophilic anaerobic spore former counts.

[0074] Storage Conditions: Products stored at 4.degree. C. (40-41.degree. F.).

[0075] The Pathogenic Organisms detected in the product after 2-105 days are shown in Tables 6.2-6.9.

TABLE-US-00012 TABLE 6.2 Inoculated Variable 1 - MicroGard 510 with C0.sub.2 waffle B. cereus S. aurues L. monocytogenes Lactic acid bacteria Yeast Average Average Average Average Average Variable I Log10 Log10 Log10 Log10 Log10 C02 (cfu/g) cfu/g (cfu/g) cfu/g (cfu/g) cfu/g (cfu/g) cfu/g (cfu/g) cfu/g Initial 1500 14000 8100 4900 8800 (Theoretical) Day 2 1000 3.0791812 9400 3.9542425 140000 4.93701611 1000 2.9542425 26000 Day 2 1400 8600 33000 800 24000 4.39794001 Day 15 900 2.8129134 5100 3.7363965 190000 5.11058971 340 2.8864907 10000 4 Day 15 400 5800 68000 1200 10000 Day 30 550 2.7520484 5000 3.744293 40000 4.34242268 95000 5.1222159 16000, 4.1903317 Day 30 580 6100 4000 170000 15000 Day 45 310 2.4771213 7200 3.6232493 63000 5.22141424 200000 5.0051805 12000 4.11394335 Day 45 290 1200 270000 2400 14000 Day 60 160 2.3222193 1200 3.2671717 11000 4.31175366 25000000 7.5740313 2300 3.78887512 Day 60 260 2500 30000 50000000 10000 Day 75 20 1.4771213 8000 4.1139434 500 3.82930377 840000 7.5845574 5000 3.49831055 Day 75 40 18000 13000 76000000 1300 Day 90 230 2.20412 200 2.2787536 22000 4.04336228 <10000 8.2787536 7200 3.6180481 Day 90 90 180 100 190000000 1100 Day 105 340 2.469822 150 2.09691 38000 4.62324929 8000000 7.0791812 3900 3.56229286 Day 105 250 100 46000 16000000 3400

TABLE-US-00013 TABLE 6.3 Inoculated Variable 2 - MicroGard CS150 with C0.sub.2 waffle B. cereus S. aurues L. monocytogenes Lactic acid bacteria Yeast Average Average Average Average Average Variable 2 Log10 Log10 Log10 Log10 Log10 C02 (cfu/g) cfu/g (cfu/g) cfu/g (cfu/g) cfu/g (cfu/g) cfu/g (cfu/g) cfu/g Initial 8800 (Theoretical) Day 2 500 2.845098 17000 4.0232525 27000 4.36172784 <100 2.30103 20000 4.21748394 Day 2 900 4100 19000 200 13000 Day 15 600 2.6532125 9000 3.7596678 33000 4.56229286 100 2.146128 11000 3.94939001 Day 15 400 2500 40000 180 6800 Day 30 430 2.6180481 2600 3.3891661 80000 4.66574174 2200 3.0569049 13000 4.06069784 Day 30 400 2300 17000 80 10000 Day 45 240 2.39794 600 3 3617278 320000 569897 120 3608526 8000 3.79239169 Day 45 260 4000 680000 8000 4400 Day 60 290 2.5740313 2000 3.0700379 13000 4.42324587 <100 2 0 8000 3.6946052 Day 60 460 350 40000 <100 1900 Day 75 210 2.4313638 2600 3.161368 29000 4.49136169 500 3.6283889 3500 3.41497335 Day 75 330 300 33000 8000 1700 Day 90 390 2.6283889 100 3.0413927 27 52000 4.83250891 40 1.544068 370 2.94694327 Day 90 460 2100 84000 30 1400 Day 105 390 2.5314789 800 2.9542425 1100000 6.04139269 12000 3.8864907 4300 3_51851394 Day 105 290 1000 1100000 3400 2300

TABLE-US-00014 TABLE 6.4 Inoculated Variable 3 - MicroGard 510 with N.sub.2 ancake B. cereus S. aurues L. monocytogenes Lactic acid bacteria Yeast Average Average Average Average Average Variable 3 Log10 Log10 Log10 Log10 Log10 N2 (cfu/g) cfu/g (cfu/g) cfu/g (cfu/g) cfu/g (cfu/g) cfu/g (cfu/g) cfu/g Initial 1500 14000 8100 4900 8800 (Theoretical) Day 2 1100 2.90309 9 4000 3.5965971 520000 5.6580114 1000 2.7781513 14000 4.07918125 Day 2 500 3900 390000 200 10000 Day 15 900 2.8750613 5000 3.90309 2800000 6.62324929 330 2.6283689 23000 4.52504481 Day 15 600 11000 5600000 520 44000 Day 30 480 2.607455 2300 3.50515 250000000 8.30103 110000 5.462398 18000 4.23044892 Day 30 330 4100 150000000 470000 16000 Day 45 220 2.3222193 2800 3.4771213 82000000 7.91645395 81000000 7.9566486 13000 4.09691001 Day 45 200 3200 83000000 100000000 12000

TABLE-US-00015 TABLE 6.5 Inoculated Variable 4 - MicroGard CS150 with N.sub.2 (pancake) B. cereus S. aurues L. monocytogenes Lactic acid bacteria Yeast Average Average Average Average Average Variable 4 Log10 Log10 Log10 Log10 Log10 N2 (cfu/g) cfu/g (cfu/g) cfu/g (cfu/g) cfu/g (cfu/g) cfu/g (cfu/g) cfu/g Initial 1500 14000 8100 4900 8800 (Theoretical) Day 2 500 2.7403627 6500 3.7853298 320000 5.35218252 <100 2 16000 4.38916608 Day 2 600 5600 130000 100 33000 Day 15 500 2.6532125 5100 3.6627578 7600000 6.68574174 80 1.9542425 22000 4.21748394 Day 15 400 4100 2100000 100 11000 Day 30 600 2.7075702 3500 3.4313638 760000000 8.83569057 110 4.2318517 28000 4.41497335 Day 30 420 1900 610000000 34000 24000 Day 45 250 2.3424227 2700 3.1903317 100000000 8.04139269 1900 3.3710679 18000 4.30103 Day 45 190 400 120000000 2800 22000 Day 60 260 2.5314789 3300 3.7520484 30000000 7.60205999 150000 5.2671717 22000 4.26717173 Day 60 420 8000 50000000 220000 15000 Day 75 340 2.5118834 3200 3.3617278 7000000 6.87506126 2000000 6.062582 4800 3.44715803 Day 75 310 1400 8000000 310000 800 Day 90 380 2.5185139 28000 4.2900346 4800000 6.8573325 1200000 5.845098 7200 3.8920946 Day 90 280 11000 9600000 200000 8400 Day 105 250 2.3222193 160000 5.2304489 2300000 6.31175386 250000000 8.4771213 2400 3.98677173 Day 105 170 180000 1800000 350000000 17000

TABLE-US-00016 TABLE 6.6 Uninoculated Control Variable I - MicroGard 510 with C0.sub.2 waffle Mesophilic anaerobic Lactic acid Aerobic Anaerobic sporeformer Variable 1 B. cereus S. aureus L. moncyfogenes bacteria Yeast plate count plate count plate count Control (cfu/g) (cfu/g) (cfu/g) (cfu/g) (cfu/g) (cfu/g) (cfu/g) (cfu/g) Day 2 <10 <10 <10 <10 <10 210 <10 140 Day 2 <10 <10 <10 <10 <10 310 <10 200 Day 105 <10 <10 <10 280000000 <10 160000000 170000000 <10 Day 105 <10 <10 <10 150000000 <10 8400000 10000000 <10 Sample aroma at 105 day interval was acceptable.

TABLE-US-00017 TABLE 6.7 Uninoculated Control Variable 2 - MicroGard CS150 with C0.sub.2 waffle Mesophilic Aerobic anaerobic Lactic acid plate Anaerobic sporeformer Variable 2 B. cereus S. aureus L. moncytogenes bacteria count plate count plate count Control (cfu/g) (cfu/g) (cfu/g) (cfu/g) Yeast (cfu/g) (cfu/g) (cfu/g) (cfu/g) Day 2 <10 <10 <10 <10 <10 110 <10 150 Day 2 <10 <10 <10 <10 <10 290 <10 120 Day 105 <10 <10 <10 40000 <10 1100 45000 <10 Day 105 <10 <10 <10 34000 <10 2000 50000 <10 Sample aroma at 105 day interval was acceptable.

TABLE-US-00018 TABLE 6.8 Uninoculated Control Variable 3 - MicroGard 510 with N.sub.2 pancake Mesophilic anaerobic Lactic acid Aerobic Anaerobic spore Variable 3 B. cereus S. aureus L. moncytogenes bacteria plate count plate count count Control (cfu/g) (cfu/g) (cfu/g) (cfu/g) Yeast (cfu/g) (cfu/g) (cfu/g) (cfu/q) Day 2 <10 <10 <10 <10 <10 390 <10 140 Day 2 <10 <10 <10 <10 <10 310 <10 170 Day 45 <10 <10 <10 2500000 <10 28000 300000 <10 Day 45 <10 <10 <10 2000000 <10 45000 400000 <10 Day 105 <10 <10 <10 560000000 <10 280000000 560000000 <10 Day 105 <10 <10 <10 390000000 <10 500000000 390000000 <10 Sample aroma at 105 day interval was unacceptable (putrid).

TABLE-US-00019 TABLE 6.9 Uninoculated Control Variable 4 - MicroGard CS150 with N.sub.2 pancake Mesophilic Lactic acid Aerobic Anaerobic anaerobic Variable 4 B. cerous S. aureus L. moncytogenes bacteria plate count plate count spore count Control (cfu/g) (cfu/g) (cfu/g) (cfu/g) Yeast (cfu/g) (cfu/g) (cfu/g) (cfu/g) Day 2 <10 <10 <10 <10 <10 150 <10 130 Day 2 <10 <10 <10 <10 <10 350 <10 130 Day 46 <10 <10 <10 39000 100 1000000 1500000 <10 Day 45 <10 <10 <10 34000 150 550000 910000 <10 Day 105 <10 <10 <10 16000000 20 17000000 18000000 <10 Day 105 <10 <10 <10 80000000 100 80000000 52000000 <10

[0076] At day 15, no appreciable changes in inoculum loads were observed, with the exception of L. monocytogenes in variables 3 and 4. A small (1 log 10) increase occurred between 2 and 15 days. All sample variable results remained acceptable.

[0077] At day 30, variable 1 experienced an approximate 2 log.sub.10 increase in lactic acid bacteria levels since the last interval (Day 15). All other results did not appreciably change. The net increase in lactic acid bacteria from the initial inoculum levels was about 2 logs, which was still considered acceptable. Variable 2 similarly experienced an increase in lactic acid bacteria, but only by approximately 1 log.sub.10. Listeria monocytogenes and lactic acid bacteria exhibited spikes (approximately 2 log) in counts in variables 3 and 4 (packaged in nitrogen). In order to determine whether the cause was related to background flora activity, the decision was made to test the uninoculated controls at the next test interval (Day 45). All results were considered acceptable after 30 days storage.

[0078] After 45 days storage, variable 1 sustained an approximate 2 log overall increase in lactic acid bacteria levels, with 45 day average loads of 5.0 log.sub.10. The changes in populations were not unacceptable. Variable 2 experienced a 1 log increase in L. monocytogenes and sustained a 2 log increase in lactic acid bacteria loads. Overall results were acceptable after 45 days storage. Variable 3 experienced an increase of approximately 5 logs in lactic acid bacteria since Day 2, which was considered unacceptable. Listeria monocytogenes increased by 2-3 log.sub.10 since initially inoculated. Counts in inoculated samples for Variable 4 did not change appreciably since the last interval (Day 30). Uninoculated control lactic acid bacteria levels were higher in uninoculated control variable 4 than in sample inoculated with lactics, reflecting that previous withdrawal of product from the container (uninoculated control) likely caused elevated counts due to fouling of the nozzle, not changes in the internal product itself. Since the results for Variable 3 were poor, testing of the inoculated sample was discontinued. Testing of the uninoculated control was continued, as for other controls. Testing for Variables 1, 2, and 4 were continued, as scheduled.

[0079] After 60 days of storage, a 2.5 and 2.0 log.sub.in increases in lactic acid bacteria levels were observed in variables 1 and 4, respectively. Results were not indicative of a product failure. No other appreciable changes in microbial loads were observed.

[0080] No appreciable changes occurred in microbial loads between 60 and 75 days storage.

[0081] After 90 days storage, 0.5 log lactic acid bacteria increase was observed in variable 1. No other changes occurred.

[0082] Between 90 and 105 days of storage, L. monocytogenes increased by 1 log.sub.10 in variable 2 and lactic acid bacteria increased by more than 2 log.sub.10. Staphylococcus aureus increased by approximately 1 log.sub.10 within the same timeframe.

[0083] None of the uninoculated controls had detectable pathogens isolated from them over the 105 day storage period.

[0084] Chief flora associated with uninoculated controls were lactic acid bacteria. Mesophilic anaerobic spore former counts did not change during the 105 storage period, indicating no need to conduct a follow-up C. botulinum inoculation study.

[0085] Aroma defects observed in uninoculated controls after 105 days storage were associated with variables 3 and 4, which had higher loads. Lactic acid bacteria, aerobic plate counts, and anaerobic plate counts in the variables with N.sub.2 used as a propellant were extremely high. In the control variables containing C0.sub.2 as a propellant, aroma defects were not observed after 105 days storage. Indicator microbe loads were also markedly lower in those variables (1 and 2).

[0086] The sum of observation results for aroma indicates the organoleptic endpoint for variables 1 and 2 was beyond 105 days and for variables 3 and 4 it was less than 105 days. The apparent microbiological endpoints are discussed below.

[0087] None of the variables supported outgrowth of toxigenic pathogens over the 105 day storage period (S. auneus, B.sub.--cereus). Variables with N.sub.2 propellant permitted faster outgrowth of L. monocytogenes, to higher levels. Use of C0.sub.2 as a propellant appears to suppress Listeria growth, reducing risk of hazard from end-user under cooking.

[0088] Overall, the formulation for Variable 2, containing MicroGard CS150 with C0.sub.2 (waffle), was most stable against spoilage organisms (uninoculated controls) and L. monocytogenes (inoculated samples). Spoilage bacterial levels never exceeded 104 cfu/g during the 105 day storage period in uninoculated controls. The marked spike (approximately 2 log.sub.10) between 90 days and 105 days in L. monocytogenes levels for the inoculated sample variable 2 reflect the microbiological endpoint for variable 2 could conservatively be set at 90 days.

[0089] The spike in lactic acid bacteria (2.5 log.sub.10) between 45 and 60 days for variable 1 indicates stability begins to decline. Since the organoleptic endpoint (uninoculated control) was beyond 105 days, a conservative endpoint for variable 1 could be set at 60 days.

[0090] The microbiological shelf life endpoint for inoculated variable 3 was 30 days, based on marked changes in lactic acid bacteria levels after that time.

[0091] The aroma for uninoculated variable 4 was objectionable after 105 days storage. The endpoint would have been sooner, but was not determined. Based on the microbiological results, a conservative endpoint for the lactic acid bacteria might be 60-75 days, based on substantial increases at those intervals.

[0092] A mix of propellant gases (N.sub.2 and C0.sub.2) would likely result in better stability than N.sub.2 alone

[0093] The resident organism in the batter using Elite Spice Pancake Mix is lactic acid bacteria. This organism is not pathogenic and the only concern is aroma defect when present in high loads.

[0094] Based on the data, Variable #2 (CS150 gassed with CO.sub.2) was the most stable against spoilage organisms. None of the variables supported outgrowth of toxigenic pathogens over the 105 day storage period (S. aureus, B. cereus). Variables with N.sub.2 propellant permitted faster outgrowth of L. monocytogenes, to higher levels but the use of CO.sub.2 as a propellant appears to suppress Listeria growth, reducing risk of hazard from end-user under baking the product while cooking.

Example 7

[0095] Aim: to monitor the weight losses in samples

[0096] The samples tested were pancake and waffle formulations with the pancake gassed with 3.5 g gas (30% CO.sub.2 and 70% N.sub.2) and the waffle gassed with 7.0 g CO.sub.2. All the samples were in 214.times.804 cans. The samples were kept at room temperature throughout the test.

TABLE-US-00020 TABLE 7.1 Age of Samples Tested for Example 7 Out of the refrigerator Age, Description Prepared Date days 05-167 waffle formula with 7.0 g Sep. 29, 2005 Mar. 1, 2006 153 CO.sub.2 05-203 waffle formula with 7.0 g Dec. 14, 2005 Mar. 1, 2006 77 CO.sub.2 06-017 pan cake formula Feb. 16, 2006 Mar. 1, 2006 13 with 3.5 g gas (30% CO.sub.2 and 70% N.sub.2) 06-018 pan cake formula Feb. 16, 2006 Mar. 1, 2006 13 with 3.5 g gas (30% CO.sub.2 and 70% N.sub.2)

TABLE-US-00021 TABLE 7.2 Weight Monitoring of Pancake and Waffle Aerosol Cans Weight, grams Day 0 2 5 9 13 Weight 05-167 642.0 641.9 641.8 641.5 641.5 -0.5 05-203 643.8 643.8 643.8 643.7 643.7 -0.1 06-017 637.6 637.6 637.5 637.6 637.5 -0.1 06-018 636.6 636.6 636.5 636.5 636.5 -0.1

[0097] Results: After 13 days, there was no significant weight loss (or leak) from the can. The weight loss observed can have been due to leakage of gas when pressure readings were taken. The packaged batter does not pose any leaking problem. The valve, crimp and can specifications are appropriate for use in this application.

Example 8

[0098] Aim: to determine the density of the batters

[0099] Formula: 47.5 powder mix/52.5 water; Cold process (water temperature is 50.degree. F.; finished batter is 61.degree. F.); Preservatives: 0.05% Sorbic Acid and 0.10% Potassium Sorbate combo; Graduated cylinder method.

[0100] Results: Calculated density: 1.33 g/mL at .about.16.degree. C. (61.degree. F.). The suspended solids made the product denser. A cold process is more appropriate for the batter preparation. Higher temperature will cause the sodium bicarbonate to decompose and the leavening effect lost.

Example 9

[0101] Aim: to determine the effect of mixing time on the viscosity of the batter.

[0102] Formula: 50/50 Elite Spice Pancake Mix 18636AO/Water. Viscosity measurements were taken throughout the mixing time of the batter. The viscometer used was Brookfield DV-II+ viscometer

TABLE-US-00022 TABLE 9.1 Effect of Time of Mixing to the Viscosity of the Batter Time, mins Viscosity, cP* Temperature, .degree. F. 2 15,000 60.0 4 16,000 6 15,000 8 14,500 10 13,500 61.3 12 13,300 14 12,750 63.0 Mixing stopped at 14 mins. Batter was stored at ~4.+-. .degree. C. (40.degree. F.) for 15 minutes. Timer is restarted 0 17,000 53.0 30 15,600 60.5 60 15,200 64.5 *RV Spindle #6 at 20 rpm, 1 minute

[0103] Results: The data show that the batter exhibits a non-Newtonian property which is thixotropic. As a result, shear (mixing) decreases the viscosity but recovers its original viscosity after the applied shear is reduced or removed. Accordingly, extended mixing of the batter to achieve homogeneity during process cannot be detrimental to the final mix.

Example 10

[0104] Aim: to determine delivery weight of batter in pressurized container.

[0105] Fill: 22 oz; Pressure: 130 psi (2.6 g N2); Can: 214.times.804; Valve: S63 3.times.022'' Summit Whipped Cream Valve (Summit)+Whipped Cream Actuator; the spray-out was not intermittent.

[0106] Results: Total delivery weight from a 22 oz filled 214.times.804 can is approximately 18 oz. Spraying the product out of the can at once leaves approximately 18% in the can. This high retention weight is due to the viscosity of the batter. The flow of the product is slow and has the tendency to cling to the sides of the can. The propellant is exhausted even before most of the product is expelled from the can.

Example 11

[0107] Aim: to determine the delivery weight of batter from a 211.times.713 can be filled at 18 oz.

[0108] Formula: Waffle (50/50 Elite Spice Pancake Mix/Water); Can: 211.times.713, 3-piece Valve: S63 3.times.0.022'' (tilt action) (Summit) Whipped Cream Valves+Whipped Cream Actuator; fill: 18 oz; Propellant: 3 g (50/50 CO.sub.2/N.sub.2); Order of gassing: CO.sub.2 first to achieve 1.5 g, then N.sub.2 with regulator set at 140 psi. At this pressure, 1.5 g N.sub.2 is injected in the can; Storage: Refrigerator at 4.+-.2.degree. C. (40.+-.2.degree. F.) for 2 days.

[0109] The product was dispensed while cold until gas starts to come out of the nozzle. The can was shaken to dispense more product.

TABLE-US-00023 TABLE 11.1 Delivery Weight of an 18 oz Batter Filled 211 .times. 713 Can Amount Delivered, g Condition 316 Gas comes out for the first time 434 After shaking; more product was dispensed until gas came out. 440 When consumer is likely to stop trying to dispense more product

[0110] Total delivery weight from an 18 oz filled 211.times.713 can is approximately 440 g or 15.5 oz. Retention weight is approximately 2.5 oz.

[0111] Results: Contrary to the procedure carried out in Example 10, the delivery was maximized by shaking the can, the retention is still approximately 13%. This is due to the viscous characteristic of the batter (as discussed in Example 10).

Example 12

[0112] Aim: to determine the delivery weight of Batter from a 211.times.713 can with a S63 3.times.0.030'' tilt action valve filled with 23 oz high water ratio batter.

[0113] Base formula: 40/60 Elite Spice Pancake Mix 18636A0/Water; Fill: 23 oz in 214.times.804 3-piece can; Valve: S63 3.times.0.030'' tilt action valve+Whipped Cream Actuator (Summit)

[0114] Propellant: (i) Pancake is gassed with .about.2.2 g (50/50 CO.sub.2/N.sub.2); Order of gassing: CO2 first to achieve 1.1 g, then N.sub.2 with regulator set at 125 psi. At this pressure, 1.1 N.sub.2 is injected in the can; (ii) Waffle is gassed with 4.3 g CO.sub.2 with the regulator set at 170 psi.

TABLE-US-00024 TABLE 12.1 Delivery Weight of High Water Ratio Batter in a Can with a S63 3 .times. 0.030'' Valve Filled at 23 oz Delivery weight, g % Delivered Pancake 20.9 90.9 Waffle 19.8 86.1

[0115] Results: Less viscous batter flowed better inside the can such that more product is expelled before the propellant is exhausted. This in effect increased the product yield from the can.

Example 13

[0116] Aim: to determine the spray rate of product using different valves.

[0117] Can: 214.times.804, 3-piece; Fill: 18 oz

[0118] Valves Tested: (i) SV-77/HF 2.times.0.035''.times.0.090'' (vertical action) (Summit)+Whipped Cream Actuator; (ii) S63 3.times.0.030''(tilt action) Whipped Cream Valve (Summit)+Whipped Cream Actuator; (iii) S63 3.times.0.022'' (tilt action) Whipped Cream Valve (Summit)+Whipped Cream Actuator.

[0119] Formulas: (i) for Valve 1, Waffle (50/50 Elite Spice Pancake Mix/Water) with 0.75% Microgard MG510; (ii) for Valve 2, Sample Code 06-159, 40/60 Elite Spice Pancake Mix 18636A0/Water; for Valve 3, Waffle (50/50 Elite Spice Pancake Mix/Water) with 0.75% Microgard MG510.

[0120] Propellant: (i) for Valve 1, 4 g (50/50 CO.sub.2/N.sub.2); Order of gassing: CO.sub.2 first to achieve 2 g, then N.sub.2 with regulator set at 125 psi. At this pressure, 2 g N.sub.2 is injected in the can; (ii) for Valve 2, approximately 7.0 g CO.sub.2; regulator pressure set at 170 psi; (iii) for Valve 3, 4 g (50/50 CO.sub.2/N.sub.2); Order of gassing: CO.sub.2 first to achieve 2 g, then N.sub.2 with regulator set at 125 psi. At this pressure, 2 g N.sub.2 is injected in the can.

[0121] Storage: Refrigerator at 4.+-.2.degree. C. (40.+-.2.degree. F.) for 3 days. Spray rates were taken at 10 seconds per spray.

TABLE-US-00025 TABLE 13.1 Spray Rate of Waffle batter (i) Using the Valve SV-77/HF 2 .times. 0.035'' .times. 0.090'' (vertical action) (Summit) Spray Rate, g/s First spray 21.7 Second spray* 21.2 The delivery weight for this sample is 12.5 oz** *Second spray lasted for only 6.5 seconds until air started to come out. **The delivery rate was not maximized. More product could be yielded by shaking the can. This was not done in this trial.

TABLE-US-00026 TABLE 13.2 Spray Rate of Waffle batter (ii) Using the Valve S633 .times. 0.030'' (tilt action) whipped cream valve (Summit) Spray Rate, g/s First spray 16.1

TABLE-US-00027 TABLE 13.3 Spray Rate of Waffle batter (ii) Using the Valve S63 3 .times. 0.022'' (tilt action) Whipped Cream Valve (Summit) Spray Rate, g/s First spray 9.2 Second spray 7.6 Third spray 6.7 Fourth spray 6.0 Fifth spray*** 6.7 Sixth spray**** 6.1 The delivery weight for this sample is 13.6 oz***** **Fifth spray was 10 mins apart from the fourth spray while the can is left at room temperature. ***Sixth spray was 10 mins apart from the fifth spray while the can is left at room temperature. Sixth spray lasted for only 5 seconds until air started to come out. *****As in Table 13.1, the delivery rate was not maximized. More product could be yielded by shaking the can. This was not done in this trial.

[0122] Results: The wide open valve SV-77/HF 2.times.0.035''.times.0.090'' (Table 13.1) delivered a faster spray rate but yielded only 12.5 oz of product (although this amount was not maximized by shaking the can). The spray rate through the valve overcame the product flow inside the can. The valve S63 3.times.0.022'' (Table 13.3) had a smaller orifice therefore having a slower spray rate but yielding around 1 oz more in delivery weight (also not maximized). The valve with slightly wider the orifice size to 3.times.0.030'' (Table 13.2) delivered a faster spray rate. This test only had one data point and no other parameters were tested.

Example 14

[0123] Aim: to set the filling parameters of products using the gasser-crimper.

[0124] Pancake and waffle products were filled at different fill weights and ran through the gasser-crimper (Terco, Inc.) varying gassing pressure and time and crimping pressure. The valves used were: (i) S63 3.times.0.030'' Tilt Action Valve+Whipped Cream Actuator (Summit); (ii) 3400 2.times.0.045''.times.0.037'' Whipped Cream Valve and Actuator (Clayton); (iii) 5477 Unrestricted Flow Whipped Cream Valve and Actuator (Clayton).

TABLE-US-00028 TABLE 14.1 Gasser-Crimper Data for Pancake batter (High Fill) Gassed with CO.sub.2 at 150 psi for 2 to 4 seconds with a Crimper Pressure of About 100 psi Initial Pressure Results and Fill, CO.sub.2 Gassing pressure, after 1 Spray rates, Sample # oz Valve injected, g time, sec psi day, psi g/s 01 23.0 3400 3.2 2 02 22.6 3400 3.4 2 03 22.5 S63 3 .times. 0.030'' 3.5 2 98 62 7.46 (shaken) 04 22.6 S63 3 .times. 0.030'' 3.4 2 90 (not shaken) 05 22.3 S63 3 .times. 0.030'' 3.6 2 06 22.3 S63 3 .times. 0.030'' 3.9 4 106 07 22.3 S63 3 .times. 0.030'' 3.9 4 08 21.8 S63 3 .times. 0.030'' 3.6 2 09 21.7 S63 3 .times. 0.030'' 3.6 2 10 22.2 S63 3 .times. 0.030'' 5.0 (Manual) 10.8 (refrigerated) 11 22.2 S63 3 .times. 0.030'' 7.0 (Manual) 13.0 (not refrigerated)

TABLE-US-00029 TABLE 14.2 Gasser-Crimper Data for Waffle batter (Various Fill Weights) with S63 3 .times. 0.030'' Whipped Cream Valve (Summit) Gassed with CO.sub.2 at 150 psi for 4 seconds with a Crimper Pressure of About 110 psi Spray Initial Following rates, g/s, Sam- Fill, CO.sub.2 pressure, pressure and other ple # oz injected, g psi data, psi Results 12 18.0 5.9 13 18.0 5.8 125 106 (6 days) 14 18.0 5.4 Average: 5.7 15 19.0 5.1 16 19.0 5.2 120 17 19.0 5.3 18 19.0 5.2 12.75 (after 5 days) Average: 5.2 19 20.0 5.0 125 111 (overnight) Retention shaken to 68 weight: 1.3 oz 20 20.0 5.0 21 20.0 5.0 22 20.0 5.1 23 20.0 5.0 Average: 5.0 24 17.6* 6.0 25 21.0 4.6 26 21.0 4.7 Average: 4.6

TABLE-US-00030 TABLE 14.3 Gasser-Crimper Data for 20 oz Waffle with 3400 Clayton Valve Gassed with CO.sub.2 at 150 psi for 2 to 4 seconds with a Crimper Pressure of About 115 psi CO.sub.2 Gassing Sample # Fill, oz injected, g time, sec Spray rates, g/s 27 20.0 4.9 4 shaken: 22.0, 21.7 overnight: 12.5 28 20.0 5.1 4 overnight: 18.0 29 20.0 4.9 4 30 20.0 4.7 2 shaken, overnight: 13.0 Average: 4.9

TABLE-US-00031 TABLE 14.4 Gasser-Crimper Data for 20 oz Waffle batter with 5477 Clayton Valve Gassed with CO.sub.2 at 150 psi for 2 seconds with a Crimper Pressure of About 115 psi Sample # Fill, oz CO.sub.2 injected, g Spray rates, g/s 31 20.0 5.3 28.0 32 20.0 5.2 33 20.0 5.1 34 20.0 5.2 35 20.0 5.3 36 20.0 5.2 37 20.0 5.2 38 20.0 5.2 39 20.0 5.3 40 20.0 5.3 Average: 5.2

[0125] Results: As the fill weight of the product is reduced, the more gas is accommodated in the can (Tables 14.1 and 14.2). The gassing capability of the plant maxes at around 5.2 g CO.sub.2 for can filled with 20 oz of batter. The desired fast/high delivery weight is achievable by using a high flow valve such as Clayton's 5477 (Table 14.4).

[0126] The mechanism of the gasser-crimper depends highly on the pressure of the propellant injected, the length of time of gassing, the headspace in the can available for the propellant, and the crimping pressure. Some of these parameters were varied and the results were very conclusive.

[0127] CO.sub.2 Pressure: Due to the gasser-crimper's limitation, the CO.sub.2 injection pressure was maxed at 150 psi to introduce the maximum amount of CO.sub.2 into the headspace of the batter.

[0128] Length of Time of Gassing: This parameter was varied from 2 to 4 seconds. As the point of entry of the gas is through the wide-open 1-inch mouth of the can, there was no restriction in gassing and extending the length of time of gassing hardly increased the amount of CO.sub.2 injected (Tables 14.1 and 14.3)

[0129] Headspace of the Can: In any can, the lesser the product contained in the can, the higher the headspace available. For the 214.times.804 can, filling the can with 18 oz of batter leaves about 400 mL headspace and filling it with 20 oz reduced the headspace by about 10% (355 ml). This is why 18 oz filled cans can hold about 5.7 g CO.sub.2 while 20 oz filled cans can hold about 5.0 g CO.sub.2 (Table 14.2)

[0130] Crimping Pressure: This is the pressure that counters the CO.sub.2 or gassing pressure. Increasing the crimping pressure will prevent some of the CO.sub.2 already situated in the headspace of the can from escaping. If this pressure is lower, some of the CO2 will evacuate the headspace until the countering crimp pressure is able to descend and fasten the valve on the can. (See Table 14.2 20 oz and table 14.4).

Example 15

[0131] It was observed that a sample gassed with CO.sub.2 was also suitable to make light and fluffy pancakes. Previously (see Example 1) it was observed that the dissolved CO.sub.2 escaped the batter during the cooking process making the pancakes flat and thin. Previously, the sample gassed with N.sub.2 made better pancakes than the one gassed with CO.sub.2. The N.sub.2 pressurized the can, but did not really get absorbed or mixed in the water/batter. The batter dispensed was therefore denser and made thicker, sponge-like pancakes similar in appearance and texture to normal pancakes. By changing the recipe, including the water to powder ratio (43% water by weight) and charging the can with more carbon dioxide (5.5 g) it has been possible to obtain light and fluffy pancakes and light and crispy waffles with the same mix. The test candidate preferred the light and fluffy pancakes over the denser pancakes made with the nitrogen filled can and the older mix.

[0132] Process Parameters: Product was prepared as shown in Table 15.1. Product was stored at under 4.degree. C. (40.degree. F.). Sampling occurred everyday for 14 days. On the 13.sup.th day the product had a sour taste, off flavor, odor and a foamy texture. Product was prepared as shown in Table 15.2. Product was stored at under 4.degree. C. (40.degree. F.). Sampling occurred everyday for 14 days. On the 119.sup.th day the product did not have a sour taste, off flavor, odor and a foamy texture.

[0133] Conclusion: the temperature that the samples that were packed at materially affects the integrity of the product when stored for long durations at below 40.degree. F. We speculate that the cold processing inhibits the transfer and or growth of bacteria prior to packaging in the cans.

TABLE-US-00032 TABLE 15.1 Process Preparation for integrity of storage study Waffle Pancake Mixing Amount 523.91 lbs 523.91 lbs Mixing Process Mixed in a 60 gal tank with a two Mixed in a 60 gal tank with a two blade mixer (manually varied blade mixer (manually varied height before circulating pump height before circulating pump was set up) was set up) Additional mixing with a lab- Additional mixing with a lab- mixer (hand held) mixer (hand held) Circulating pump Circulating pump Mixing Time Addition of ingredients (while Total mixing time including mixing): 60 mins addition of ingredients while Mixing (without circulating mixing and while circulating pump): 30 mins pump is on: 180 minutes Stand-by time (pump installation): 30 mins Circulating pump: 60 mins TOTAL: 180 minutes Sequence of addition of Water Water ingredients Powder Mix (dried whole egg, Powder Mix (dried whole egg, soybean powder, sodium soybean powder, sodium bicarbonate, salt, cultured bicarbonate, salt, cultured dextrose maltodextrin, dicalcium dextrose maltodextrin, dicalcium phosphate, xantham gum) phosphate, xantham gum) Sugar Sugar Wheat flour Wheat flour Mixing temperature 70.degree. F. 70.degree. F. Finished batch temperature 70.degree. F. 75.degree. F. Filling Fill 20 oz 20 oz CO weight 5.2 g average 5.4 g average Can Pressure ~130 (start) ~130 (start) ~115 (overnight, no shaking) ~115 (overnight, no shaking)

TABLE-US-00033 TABLE 15.2 Cold Process Preparation for integrity of storage study Waffle Pancake Mixing Amount 523.91 lbs 523.91 lbs Mixing Process Mixed in a 60 gal tank with a two Mixed in a 60 gal tank with a two blade mixer (manually varied blade mixer (manually varied height before circulating pump height before circulating pump was set up) was set up) Additional mixing with a lab- Additional mixing with a lab- mixer (hand held) mixer (hand held) Circulating pump Circulating pump Mixing Time Addition of ingredients (while Total mixing time including mixing): 60 mins addition of ingredients while Mixing (without circulating mixing and while circulating pump): 30 mins pump is on: 180 minutes Stand-by time (pump installation): 30 mins Circulating pump: 60 mins TOTAL: 180 minutes Sequence of addition of Water Water ingredients Powder Mix (dried whole egg, Powder Mix (dried whole egg, soybean powder, sodium soybean powder, sodium bicarbonate, salt, sodium lactate, bicarbonate, salt, sodium lactate, dicalcium phosphate, rice bran) dicalcium phosphate, rice bran) Sugar Sugar Wheat flour Wheat flour Mixing temperature 39.degree. F. 39.degree. F. Finished batch temperature 40.degree. F. 40.degree. F. Filling Fill 20 oz 20 oz CO weight 5.2 g average 5.4 g average Can Pressure ~130 (start) ~130 (start) ~115 (overnight, no shaking) ~115 (overnight, no shaking)

Example 16

Growth of Selected Spoilage and Pathogenic Organisms in an Aerosol Food Product

[0134] Product was prepared as shown in Table 16.1. Product was stored at under 4.degree. C. (40.degree. F.). 20 oz. Cans 567.0 g product and 5.5 g CO.sub.2. Report from BETA Food Consulting, Inc.

[0135] Following is a study conducting a microbiological challenge study on the revised formula of the aerosolized food product (Table 16.1). The pH of the aerosol food product is approximately 6.57.5 and the water activity is 0.96.

[0136] Purposes: The purpose of the study is to determine the fate of selected spoilage and surrogates for pathogenic microbial agents when inoculated into an aerosolized food product. Outgrowth of lactic acid bacteria and Listeria monocytogenes was problematic in Example 4. For this reason, these organisms are studied in this formulation. A surrogate organism (Listeria innocua) that is non-pathogenic will be used instead of L. monocytogenes to avoid potential contamination of facility.

[0137] Product Variable: The product to be studied is given in Table 16.1; the variable addressed is the use of sodium lactate with CO.sub.2.

[0138] The intended shelf life is 45-60 days, minimum The study will assess stability for as long as 120 days.

[0139] Process: The batter temperature is 7.degree. C. (45.degree. F.) or below at the time of filling the cans. Empty cans will be disinfected per the process set-up, with chlorine at 50-200 ppm. Filled cans will be removed from the line before installation of the gas valves. They will immediately be transported to the in-house laboratory for inoculation, before having the valve tops installed and gas applied. Finished cans will be stored and transported to Food Microbiological Laboratories by Follmer in a refrigerated truck.

[0140] Organisms: The organisms for challenge should represent those of potential safety and spoilage concern, as demonstrated in the previous study. No mesophilic spore former activity was noted in the previous study, indicating C. botulinum should not be problematic.

[0141] The test organism categories will include:

1. Listeria innocua (non-pathogenic surrogate organism for L. monocytogenes (gram positive non-spore former, psychrotroph). 2. Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus plantarum (combined inoculum of gram positive non-spore formers).

[0142] Culture Preparation: Lactic acid bacteria will be grown as a lawn on sterile MRS agar. Listeria innocua will be grown on sterile trypticase soy agar with yeast extract. Bacteria will be cultured for 24 hours at 35.degree. C., then streaked again on trypticase soy agar and incubated for 48 hours at 35.degree. C. The cells will be prepared by harvesting cells into sterile 0.1% peptone water.

[0143] Inoculum will be adjusted to deliver a target initial load of 103-104 cfu/g (minimum 590,000 cfulcan in each 20 fl. oz. can). Inoculation will be delivered with a 1 ml inoculum volume. The cans will be inoculated in the in-house laboratory at Follmer Development on the R & D laboratory bench top capping unit that is remote from the processing area and not used for production. A Food Safety Solutions representative will assist with inoculation at the facility in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

[0144] Sixteen cans for each inoculum group will need to be prepared. Sixteen Uninoculated control cans are also necessary. The customer will be responsible for adequate cleaning and sanitization of the bench top filling unit. Swabs of the bench, utensils, and rinsate from the valve application and gas charging unit will be collected after cleaning and sanitization is complete--The unit should not be used before results reflect inoculum organisms have been adequately ridded

[0145] Test Method: Test methods for quantitation will be per FDA-BAM or AOAC. The changes in loads for each inoculum group will be measured at each test interval. Testing will be done in duplicate. Trend information about growth, death, or stasis will be available from the data

[0146] Test Interval: Test intervals will be spaced appropriately to represent a 120 day storage period. Testing will be conducted on inoculated variables at day 2, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105 and 120. Uninoculated controls will be analyzed at 2, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105 and 120.

[0147] Uninoculated control samples will be analyzed to determine background spoilage flora response, and also for absence of Listeria innocua. They will be analyzed for L. innocua, lactic acid bacteria, yeast, mesophilic aerobic plate count, and mesophilic anaerobic spore former counts.

[0148] Storage Conditions: Products will be stored at 4.degree. C. (40-41.degree. F.).

[0149] Product: The constituents of the Product to be tested are shown in Table 16.1.

TABLE-US-00034 TABLE 16.1 Product Constituents Ingredients Batch % Target Batch # Equiv. Wt. g Water 40.3609% 8.88 4036-090 Wheat Flour 34.3302% 7.60 3453.020 (white, all-purpose, enriched, unbleached) Sugars. Granulated 12.3860% 2.72 1238.600 Egg, Whole, Dried 2.6075% 0.57365 260.750 Organic Soybean Powder 1.5645% 034419 156.45000 Bakeshire 187 (Sodium 1.1734% 0.26 117.340 Bicarbonate) Salt 0.6519% 0-14 63.190 SL.-75A Sodium 3.0000% 0.66000 300.000 Lactate (60%) Dicalcium Phosphate 3.5100% 0.77220 351.000 Dihydrate Ribus Nu-bake 0.1956% 0.04303 19.360 TOTALS: 100.0000% 22.00 10000.00

[0150] The Pathogenic Organisms detected in a product spiked with the organism and tested after a given number of days is shown in Table 16.2. The Pathogenic Organisms detected in a control sample not spiked with the organism and tested after a given number of days is shown in Table 16.3.

TABLE-US-00035 TABLE 16.2 Pathogenic Organisms detected in spiked product Sodium lactate w/CO.sub.2 L. Innocua Lactic acid bacteria Test Average Average interval (cfu/g) Log.sub.10 cfu/g (cfu/g) Log.sub.10 cfu/g Initial 30000 170000 (Theoretical) Day 2 2600 3.38916608 7600 3.81291336 Day 2 2300 5400 Day 30 830 3.04758468 Day 30 1500

TABLE-US-00036 TABLE 16.3 Pathogenic Organisms detected in unspiked product Mesophilic Lactic acid Aerobic anaerobic Variable 1 Listeria bacteria plate count spore former Control genus/25 g) (cfu/g) (cfu/g) count (cfu/g) Day 2 Negative 280 230 <10 Day 2 Negative 290 160 <10

Example 17

Viscosity Enabler

[0151] Product was prepared in 20 oz cans, 567.0 g product and 5.5 g CO.sub.2) or alternatively was a commercially available (Aunt Jemima) batter prepared according to the directions. Both products were stored at under approximately 4.degree. C. (40.degree. F.).

[0152] The batter needs to flow at a certain rate for an optimal product. Thus it needs a certain viscosity. In an embodiment of the invention, the CO.sub.2 is used to insure that the product does not separate or degrade and the viscosity remains relatively stable as shown in Table 17.1.

TABLE-US-00037 TABLE 17.1 Comparison of Viscosity of Pressurized product with commercial pancake mix. Carbon Dioxide Aunt Jemima no gas Can date Feb. 24, 2007 Single can spray out 3 ounce per test Pour out 3 ounce per test Est. shelf life Chilled 120 days Freeze thaw product Day 1 Viscosity test meters 13800 Viscosity test meter 16800 CO.sub.2 gassed at 150 psi Stored at 40.degree. F. CO.sub.2 in can 6 grams Batter has nice consistency easy to Held at 40.degree. F. pour. Day 15 Viscosity is at its highest point or Viscosity test meter 8400 thickest point before the Co2 can Bacteria growth and moisture saturate the batter. separation. Viscosity test meters 13000 Consistency is thin. CO.sub.2 has totally saturated the batter thus stabilizing the batter. Consistency is light and fluffy Day 30 Viscosity test meter 13200 Viscosity test meter 7600 Less batter in the can creates more Bacteria growth, off odor and head space for CO.sub.2 moisture separation Consistency is light and fluffy. Batter unusable. Day 45 Viscosity test meter 13200 Test meter could not measure because Consistency light fluffy solids and liquid had separated. Day 60 Viscosity test meter 13100 N/A Consistency light fluffy Day 120 Viscosity test meter 13000 Consistency light fluffy End of the can has extra amount of CO.sub.2 pressure released Fill 200z 16 oz CO.sub.2 weight 6 g average 0 Can pressure ~150 (start) ~0 ~130 (overnight, no shaking)

Example 18

Browning of Product

[0153] Product was prepared as shown in Table 15.1 (20 oz cans 567.0 g product and 5.5 g CO.sub.2) or alternatively was a commercially available (Aunt Jemima) batter prepared according to the directions. Both products were stored at under approximately 4.degree. C. (40.degree. F.).

[0154] FIG. 5 (black and white) and FIG. 6 (color) show a waffle (10) and a pancake (20) which were dispensed from a pressurized canister containing carbon dioxide. In comparison, the same batter applied directly to the waffle iron (30) or frying pan (40) was baked for the same length of time at the same temperature. The carbon dioxide gas allows for the easy flow of the batter from the pressurized canister and also aerates the batter mix. Unexpectedly, the carbon dioxide results in a brownish appearance, crunchy texture and attractive taste to the food product. The carbon dioxide's attractive browning of the waffle or pancake thereby allows the food product to be baked more rapidly and efficiently. The carbon dioxide improves the taste experience of the person consuming the food product.

DEFINITION OF TERMS

[0155] Clayton: Clayton Corporation; supplier of valves and caps.

[0156] Delivery Weight: the total amount of product sprayed after all the pressure in the can is exhausted.

[0157] Bakable: including frying, steaming, toasting, boiling, grilling and cooking including cooking on a waffle iron, cooking on a frying pan and cooking in an oven.

[0158] Browning: refers to the color of the bakable food product upon baking and corresponds with the oxidation of one or more of the carbonaceous components in the composition.

[0159] Light and Fluffy: easily cut with a plastic knife. Pancake or food product retains shape and form after being compressed. Does not require metal knife or excessive force to cut or slice food product. Food product is not heavy or dense and plastic knife does not permanently compress food product at a distance of 2 mm from the knife blade when cutting food product. Food product does not result in heavy feeling in stomach or other discomfort when eaten. See also sponge-like.

[0160] Propellant(s): compressed gas Carbon Dioxide (CO.sub.2) or Nitrogen (N.sub.2) or a combination of both.

[0161] Resident Microorganism: chief microbial flora or the microorganism normally existing in the product.

[0162] Retention or Retention Weight: the amount of product remaining in the can after all the pressure in the can is exhausted.

[0163] Sponge-like: having the characteristics of a sponge; bread with consistent size of air pockets as in sponge cake; a desirable characteristic of a pancake.

[0164] Spray Rate: amount of product sprayed out of a can at a given amount of time; typically in grams per 1 second spray.

[0165] Summit: Summit Packaging Systems, Inc.; supplier of valves and actuators.

[0166] Water: de-ionized water.

[0167] It is to be understood that other embodiments of the invention can be developed and fall within the spirit and scope of the invention and claims

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