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United States Patent Application 20160178313
Kind Code A1
Schley; Lee June 23, 2016

Crossbow Trigger-release Aid Method

Abstract

A method for providing for the disarming of a loaded crossbow in order to relieve the tension of the bow safely and facilitating an unloading process is described. The method employs a pair of bow grip handles equipped with J-shaped hooks, designed to grip the bowstring during the application and release of bow tension. The bow grip handles are fashioned with a receptacle configured to receive a mounting member in order to hold the bow grip handles in place against the body of the crossbow, providing for the tension of the bow to be safely released after the trigger of the crossbow is disarmed. The method preferably has an anti-fire bolt for use with anti-fire trigger systems.


Inventors: Schley; Lee; (Cheboygan, MI)
Applicant:
Name City State Country Type

Schley; Lee

Cheboygan

MI

US
Family ID: 1000001781306
Appl. No.: 15/059241
Filed: March 2, 2016


Related U.S. Patent Documents

Application NumberFiling DatePatent Number
14312812Jun 24, 2014
15059241
61841588Jul 1, 2013

Current U.S. Class: 124/86
Current CPC Class: F41B 5/12 20130101; F41B 5/1469 20130101
International Class: F41B 5/14 20060101 F41B005/14; F41B 5/12 20060101 F41B005/12

Claims



1. A crossbow bowstring unloading method comprising: first, affixing a first bowstring grip to the bowstring via a first hook, overdrawing the bowstring; second, affixing a second bowstring grip to the bowstring via a second hook, overdrawing the bowstring; third, affixing the first bowstring grip and the second bowstring grip to a stock of a crossbow and mounting them in place via a mounting member fitting in a mounting receptacle; fourth, frictionally binding the bowstring to a bowstring grip anchor; fifth, activating a trigger of a crossbow, disarming a trigger release of the crossbow; sixth, pulling the first bowstring grip and the second bowstring grip simultaneously beyond the bowstring grip anchor; and seventh, releasing the bowstring and returning the bowstring to a neutral state.

2. The crossbow bowstring unloading method of claim 1, wherein the first hook is j-shaped and wherein the second hook is j-shaped.

3. The crossbow bowstring unloading method of claim 1, further comprising affixing the bowstring grip anchor to the stock of the crossbow via at least one screw.

4. A method of disarming a crossbow comprising: first, loading the crossbow with a bolt by pulling the bowstring back and locking the bowstring into place through the use of a first bowstring grip and a second bowstring grip; wherein the first bowstring grip and the second bowstring grip are equipped with hooks; second, temporarily affixing the first bowstring grip and the second bowstring grip to the bowstring via the hooks; third, overdrawing the bowstring; fourth, affixing the first bowstring grip and the second bowstring grip to the stock of the crossbow; fifth, mounting the first bowstring grip and the second bowstring grip in position on the stock of the crossbow via a mounting member interfacing with a mounting receptacle; sixth, tension frictionally binding the bowstring against a bowstring grip anchor; seventh, activating a trigger of the crossbow whereby the trigger release of the crossbow is disarmed; eighth, relieving the tension of the bowstring by gradually pulling the first bowstring grip and the second bowstring grip back simultaneously beyond the bowstring grip anchor; and ninth, releasing the bowstring gradually to a neutral state.
Description



CONTINUITY

[0001] This application is a divisional patent application of non-provisional patent application Ser. No. 14/312,812, filed on Jun. 24, 2014, which claims priority to Provisional Patent Application No. 61/841,588, filed on Jul. 1, 2013.

FIELD OF THE PRESENT INVENTION

[0002] The present invention relates to projectile devices, and more specifically, those including trigger-activated arrow suspension systems such as crossbows.

BACKGROUND OF THE PRESENT INVENTION

[0003] During the process of loading a crossbow, the user is conventionally required to exert force on the bow, cocking the bow into place near the rear of the crossbow frame. The bow is usually locked in place by a trigger, which may also be locked in place via a safety or trigger-switch. Additionally, during the process of loading a crossbow, the arrow is conventionally placed proximal or against the bow. The trigger may hold the arrow in place as well, in order to ensure that the bolt is retained in place for firing when the crossbow assembly is aimed or pointed downward. Many devices have been crafted in order to facilitate and expedite this process, such as a foot stirrup on the front of the crossbow to aide in the cocking of the bow, and hooks attached to handles which are configured to facilitate the exertion of force on the bow during cocking.

[0004] Unfortunately, once a crossbow is cocked and loaded, it is conventionally required to remain in a loaded state until it is fired. Historically, it is not an easy process, or is simply impossible to disarm or unload a loaded crossbow without actually firing the bolt or arrow. Once the arrow or bolt is placed into the barrel and the arrow spring restraint is activated, the arrow is not conventionally designed to be released until it is fired. Some crossbow users even keep a target or hay bail nearby to safely disarm the crossbow by simply firing the arrow into the target. While some high-end or expensive crossbows may have a disarming aid built into the trigger mechanism, the vast majority of crossbows are unequipped with such a feature.

[0005] Thus, there is a need for a device and method which can provide for the safe and easy disarming or unloading of a loaded and cocked crossbow which can be modularly adapted to a wide assortment of crossbows which are unequipped with such a feature by default. The device is preferably capable of retaining the tension of the bowstring, enabling the release of the trigger without allowing the force of the bowstring to contact the arrow or bolt.

SUMMARY OF THE PRESENT INVENTION

[0006] The present invention is an attachment mechanism and system which facilitates and provides for a means to safely release the trigger of a loaded crossbow, successfully disarming a crossbow without firing or delivering force to the bolt or arrow. The present invention employs a pair of bowstring grip handles which are similar to conventional handles in that they are designed to grip the bowstring and facilitate the user's draw of the bowstring. Conventionally, the user's foot is placed in the foot stirrup of the crossbow and the user employs both hands to draw the bowstring back and lock it into place behind a trigger switch or bowstring retainer.

[0007] The present invention is designed to add additional functionality to a bowstring grip handle. Two bowstring grips with handles are preferably employed by the present invention in order to enable a symmetrical application of force to the bowstring when drawn. The bowstring grip handles are each equipped with a hook which is designed to be a sturdy means of grabbing the bowstring in order to draw the bow. The bowstring grip handles of the present invention vary from conventional bowstring grips in that they are equipped with a means of mounting the handles to the stock of the crossbow.

[0008] The mounting of the bowstring grips to the stock of the crossbow by the user while the bow string is drawn is facilitated by a bowstring grip anchor, which is preferably installed along the top of the stock of the crossbow. The bowstring grip anchor is designed to be affixed securely to the stock of the crossbow, and is equipped with at least one mounting receptacle. The mounting receptacle is configured to receive a mounting member located on the bowstring grip handles. The mounting receptacle on the bowstring grip anchor temporarily and securely holds the bowstring grip handles in position against the stock when the present invention is in use. The mounting receptacle is preferably made out of a metallic alloy or other suitable material, to ensure that the bowstring grip handles are stable in position when affixed to the bowstring grip anchor.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0009] FIG. 1 shows a flow chart detailing the process of preferred use of the present invention as it relates to the process of loading and unloading a crossbow.

[0010] FIG. 2 is a diagram showing the bowstring grip anchor of the present invention as mounting to the stock of a conventional crossbow.

[0011] FIG. 3 is a front view of the bow string grip handles of the preferred embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

[0012] The present invention is a loading and unloading aide method for a crossbow. The method of the present invention employs a first bowstring grip (10) and a second bowstring grip (20). The first bowstring grip (10) and the second bowstring grip (20) are each equipped with a hook (30), which is smaller than the first bowstring grip (10) and the second bowstring grip (20), and is configured to be temporarily affixed to the bowstring of the crossbow during the cocking process. The hook (30) that the preferred embodiment of the present invention employs is preferably J-shaped, and is preferably sized according to the diameter of the bowstring.

[0013] Additionally, the first bowstring grip (10) and the second bowstring grip (20) are each equipped with a handle (60) which is preferably ergonomic and comfortable for the hand of a user to use when force is applied to the handle (60). The first bowstring grip (10) and the second bowstring grip (20) are preferably linked together via a string (40) or flexible clasp, facilitating an even draw when the first bowstring grip (10) and the second bowstring grip (20) are used to draw the string of the crossbow simultaneously. When using the present invention, the crossbow is conventionally cocked in a fairly standard manner, by which the user attaches the first bowstring grip (10) and the second bowstring grip (20) to the bowstring, and places a foot on the cocking stirrup in order to anchor the crossbow in place so that the first bowstring grip (10) and the second bowstring grip (20) may be pulled upward safely, adding potential energy to the string and pulley system.

[0014] While it is envisioned that the first bowstring grip (10) and the second bowstring grip (20) are designed to be removably applied to the crossbow during use, a second portion of the present invention, the bowstring grip anchor (50) is preferably affixed to the stock of the crossbow, near the rear as seen in FIG. 1. The bowstring grip anchor (50) is preferably installed at a specific distance from the bowstring and the conventional trigger assembly of the crossbow. It is envisioned that the first bowstring grip (10) and the second bowstring grip (20) may be adjustable in some embodiments of the present invention in order to easily accommodate a wider range of crossbow frames.

[0015] For example, in the event that a specific crossbow stock does not have a suitable position for the bowstring grip anchor (50) to be installed, it may be required for the bowstring grip anchor (50) to be installed farther toward the rear of the stock of the crossbow. In such an event, the distance between the hook (30) and the handle (60) may be extended in order to accommodate the greater distance between the bowstring grip anchor (50) and the bowstring of the crossbow. It is envisioned that, in some embodiments of the present invention, the bowstring grip anchor (50) may be mounted to a removable screw-tension mount, which may be screwed onto the stock of the crossbow via a conventional finger-tight tightening knob.

[0016] In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, it is envisioned that the bowstring grip anchor (50) of the present invention is preferably constructed of a metal or metallic alloy such as aluminum or stainless steel. Likewise, the bowstring grip anchor (50) of the present invention is preferably installed onto the stock of the crossbow by the user or by a professional at a crossbow or firearm supply store. The bowstring grip anchor (50) is ideally securely affixed to the stock of the crossbow via at least one screw (70). Conversely, rivets or other similar metallic means of securing items may be employed to securely mount or install the bowstring grip anchor (50) to the stock of the crossbow. As previously outlined, some embodiments of the present invention may employ a bowstring grip anchor (50) that is not permanently affixed to the stock of the crossbow, and may be installed or removed with ease at the will of the user.

[0017] The bowstring grip anchor (50), as seen in FIG. 1 is equipped with a mounting receptacle (80) configured to interface with and secure to the handles (60) of the first bowstring grip (10) and the second bowstring grip (20) via a mounting member (90) located on the handles (60). The mounting member (90) on the handles (60) of the first bowstring grip (10) and the second bowstring grip (20) is configured to fit within the mounting receptacle (80) of the bowstring grip anchor (50). The mounting receptacle (80) is preferably designed to securely and temporarily receive and maintain the mounting member (90) on the handles (60) when the user of the present invention interlocks the mounting member (90) into the mounting receptacle (80) located within the handles (60) of the present invention.

[0018] The mounting receptacle (80) on the bowstring grip anchor (50) of the preferred embodiment of the present invention is preferably horizontal, extending perpendicular to the barrel of the crossbow. However, it is envisioned that other conventional forms of mounts may be employed in order to provide a means of temporarily yet securely affixing the first bowstring grip (10) and the second bowstring grip (20) to the bowstring grip anchor (50). The force of tension maintained within the cocked bowstring, extended to the handles (60), is forced to bind against the mounting receptacle (80) of the bowstring grip anchor (50) via the mounting member (90). This redistribution of the tension of the bowstring is enacted by design via the present invention in order to provide for the safe activation of the trigger. After the trigger is activated, the flight groove and/or barrel of the crossbow is free of obstruction, which provides for the gradual release of the bowstring tension via the first bowstring grip (10) and the second bowstring grip (20) with opposing force provided by the user's foot within the conventional foot stirrup of the crossbow. The mounting receptacle is preferably made out of a metallic alloy to ensure that the bowstring grip handles are stable in position when affixed to the bowstring grip anchor.

[0019] The preferred embodiment of the present invention is preferably used as seen in the flow-chart of FIG. 1, which is outlined as follows: First, the user conventionally loads the crossbow with a bolt by pulling the bowstring back and locking it into place through the use of the first bowstring grip (10) and the second bowstring grip (20). [200] The first bowstring grip (10) and the second bowstring grip (20) are temporarily affixed to the bowstring via the hooks (100). [210] In order to disarm the crossbow, the user temporarily affixes the first bowstring grip (10) and the second bowstring grip (20) to the bowstring and over-draws the bowstring slightly [220]. The user then affixes the first bowstring grip (10) and the second bowstring grip (20) to the stock of the crossbow and mounts them in place via the mounting member (90), designed to fit securely within the mounting receptacle (80) [230]. At this point, the tension of the bowstring is forced to frictionally bind against the bowstring grip anchor (50) of the present invention, rather than the trigger release [240]. Next, the user activates the conventional trigger of the crossbow, disarming the trigger release of the crossbow [250]. After the trigger has been fired, the user is free to relieve the tension of the bowstring via the first bowstring grip (10) and the second bowstring grip (20) by gently pulling the first bowstring grip (10) and the second bowstring grip (20) back simultaneously beyond the bowstring grip anchor, then releasing the bowstring slowly so that the bowstring may return safely to a neutral state. [260]

[0020] Some embodiments of the present invention preferably employ an anti-dry fire bolt (100), envisioned to function as a bolt release for an anti-fire mechanism (110) of the present invention. The anti-dry fire bolt (100) of the present invention is preferably configured to rest in communication with the anti-fire mechanism (110) via a hole (120) found near the center of the anti-fire mechanism (110) which is approximately the circumference of the anti-dry fire bolt (100). The anti-fire mechanism (110) is configured to interface with the bowstring and bolt within the crossbow, and prevent the firing of the loaded within the crossbow. This provides added safety to those employing the present invention to safely unload and un-cock a crossbow.

[0021] All embodiments of the present invention are designed to facilitate and enhance the process of loading a crossbow, and provides for the safe release of the tension within the bowstring without having to physically fire a bolt or arrow out of the barrel.

[0022] Having illustrated the present invention, it should be understood that various adjustments and versions might be implemented without venturing away from the essence of the present invention. Further, it should be understood that the present invention is not solely limited to the invention as described in the embodiments above, but further comprises any and all embodiments within the scope of this application.

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