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United States Patent Application 20170156509
Kind Code A1
Markowitz; Evan June 8, 2017

PROTECTIVE COVER WITH RETENTION STRAPS

Abstract

Disclosed herein is an anti-slip protective cover used to protect the outer surface of a furniture article. The anti-slip protective cover includes a first layer formed of a protective material and a second layer formed of an anti-slip material. The cover also includes a retention tie connected to at least one of the first layer or the second layer. The retention tie is operable to extend around a first portion of the furniture article such that the retention tie operably anchors the first layer and the second layer to the furniture article. The retention tie is attached to at least one of the first layer or the second layer such that the anti-slip material of the second layer is held against the first portion of the furniture article such that the friction between the anti-slip material and the furniture article limits relative movement between the cover and the furniture article.


Inventors: Markowitz; Evan; (Brooklyn, NY)
Applicant:
Name City State Country Type

GREEN POINT DECOR, LLC

Mount Kisco

NY

US
Family ID: 1000001977190
Appl. No.: 14/959584
Filed: December 4, 2015


Current U.S. Class: 1/1
Current CPC Class: A47C 31/11 20130101
International Class: A47C 31/11 20060101 A47C031/11

Claims



1. An anti-slip protective cover for protecting a furniture article, comprising: a layer formed of a protective material or an anti-slip material, with the layer having a plurality of different panels extending in separate directions from a central region with the central region operable to extend over a seat portion and the different panels operable to extend over a back portion, and arm portions of a chair or couch; and a retention tie connected to the layer with the retention tie sufficiently long to extend around one or more seat cushions forming a part of the furniture article such that the retention tie operably anchors the layer to the one or more seat cushions.

2. The cover of claim 1, wherein the retention tie is attached to the layer such that an anti-slip material is held against the one or more seat cushions such that the friction between the anti-slip material and the seat cushions limits relative movement between the layer and the seat cushions

3. The cover of claim 1, further comprising a plurality of retention ties.

4. The cover of claim 3, wherein at least some of the plurality of retention ties extend transversely across a portion of the central region such that at least one of the plurality of retention ties is operable to extend around a first seat cushion with another one of the plurality of retention ties being operable to extend around a second seat cushion.

5. The cover of claim 3, wherein at least some of the plurality of retention ties extend latterly across a portion of the central region extending around one or more seat cushions.

6. The cover of claim 3, wherein at least one retention tie of the plurality of retention ties extends across a portion of the central region in a direction different than a second retention tie of the plurality of retention ties such that the separate retention ties cross one another.

7. The cover of claim 1, wherein a second retention tie is configured to extend around a back rest of the furniture article, such that the cover operable to be anchored to the back rest and the one or more seat cushions.

8. The cover of claim 1, wherein the retention tie is elastic with sufficient length to stretch around the one or more cushions, with the retention tie connected to the cover at opposite ends of the central portion in a transverse or lateral direction ends.

9. The cover of claim 1, wherein the retention tie is a strap.

10. The cover of claim 1, wherein a portion of the retention tie is detachable by hand from the cover.

11. The cover of claim 10, wherein the retention tie is detachably connected to the cover by a fastener engaged with a loop on a strap portion.

12. The cover of claim 11, wherein the fastener includes a hook portion on one portion of the retention tie operable to engage a loop portion on another portion of the retention strap.

13. The cover of claim 11, wherein each end of the retention tie includes a fastener such that the portion of the retention tie that is removable from the cover is a middle portion of the retention tie.

14. The cover of claim 1, wherein the retention tie is adjustable in length to fit around different sizes and lengths of cushions.

15. The cover of claim 1, further comprising a retention loop positioned on the second panel with the retention tie being positioned relative to the retention loop to enable the retention tie to pass through the retention loop when the retention tie is extended around the one or more seat cushions thereby enabling the retention loops to bias the layer toward the one or more cushions by anchoring the layer to the retention tie at a location different than the connection location.

16. An anti-slip protective cover for protecting a furniture article, comprising: a layer having a peripheral region surrounding an interior portion and a plurality of different panels extending in separate directions from a central region with the central region operable to extend over a seat portion and the different panels operable to extend over a back portion, and arm portions of a chair or couch; and a plurality of retention ties connected to the layer with at least a first retention tie of the plurality of retention ties extending across a portion of the central region in a direction different than a second retention tie of the plurality of retention ties such that the first and second retention ties cross one another.

17. The cover of claim 16, wherein the plurality of retention ties are sufficiently long to extend around one or more seat cushions forming a part of the furniture article such that the retention ties operably anchor the cover to the one or more seat cushions.

18. The cover of claim 16, wherein the retention ties are attached to the layer such that an anti-slip material is held against the one or more seat cushions causing the friction between the anti-slip material and the seat cushions limits relative movement between the layer and the seat cushions

19. The cover of claim 16, wherein the connection is a connective material that is arranged in intervals extending across a portion of the interior portion of the anti-slip material and the protective material.

20. The cover of claim 19, wherein the connections extend from a first portion of the peripheral region to a second portion of the peripheral region with the connections traversing the interior portions in two different directions.

21. An anti-slip protective cover for protecting a furniture article, comprising: a first layer formed of a protective material, with the protective material having a peripheral region surrounding an interior portion; a second layer formed of an anti-slip material, with the anti-slip material having a peripheral region surrounding an interior portion; and a retention tie connected to at least one of the first layer or the second layer with the retention tie operable to bias the anti-slip material against a portion of the furniture article increasing the friction between the anti-slip material and the furniture article to limit relative movement between the cover and the furniture article.

22. An anti-slip protective cover for protecting a furniture article, comprising a layer of material that comprises: a seat panel operable to extend over a seat portion of the furniture article; a second panel extending from the seat panel and operable to extend over front and back sides of another portion of the furniture article; a retention loop positioned on the second panel; and a retention tie connected to the second panel at a connection location so that the retention tie is operable to extend around the other portion of the furniture article and bias the second panel toward the other portion of the furniture article at the connection location, wherein the retention tie is positioned relative to the retention loop to enable the retention tie to pass through the retention loop when the retention tie is extended around the other portion of the furniture article thereby enabling the retention loops to bias the second panel toward the other portion of the furniture article by anchoring the second panel to the retention tie at a location different than the connection location.

23. The anti-slip protective cover of claim 22, wherein the retention tie is connected to the second panel at a plurality of connection locations.

24. The anti-slip protective cover of claim 22, wherein the connection locations are disposed near lateral edges of the second panel.

25. The anti-slip protective cover of claim 22, wherein the connection location is displaced closer to the seat panel than the loop and is spaced from the loop sufficiently to be located on an opposite side of the furniture article from the loop when the second panel is extended over and around the other furniture article.

26. The anti-slip protective cover of claim 22, wherein the retention loop comprises a plurality of retention loops.

27. The anti-slip protective cover of claim 23, wherein the retention loops are positioned proximal to opposing lateral edges of the second panel.

28. The anti-slip protective cover of claim 22, wherein the furniture article is a chair or couch.

29. The anti-slip protective cover of claim 28, wherein the second panel is a back panel and the other portion is the back rest of the chair or couch.
Description



CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application is related to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 14/715,388 filed on May 18, 2015 and entitled "Anti-Slip Protective Cover," which is hereby incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.

TECHNICAL FIELD

[0002] Disclosed herein are furniture protectors and, more particularly, furniture protectors having retention straps.

BACKGROUND

[0003] Typical furniture articles including couches, chairs, or the like encounter high usage, causing wear and tear. These furniture articles benefit from the use of surface protection to extend their lives by reducing the wear and tear directly to the furniture themselves. In addition, most of these furniture articles are further benefited by the use of a movement reduction element that helps hold the surface protection in place so that the maximum benefit from the surface protection can be achieved.

[0004] Numerous different forms of movement reduction elements are used in the furniture protective cover industry. For example, high friction material is sometimes used as disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,809,595 or 7,159,257. For example, flaps are sometimes incorporated into the surface protection. The flaps are appendages that extend from the surface protection to be tucked between cushions or the like. The pressure on the flaps between the cushions resists the movement of the surface protection when in use. These flaps may be located behind the seat cushion, or under the seat cushion. Examples of this are discussed in U.S. Pat. No. 7,431,394.

[0005] A suitable solution to overcome slippage problems in the furniture protective cover industry has not been provided. Specifically, a light-weight protective cover with an anti-slip material and/or retention straps that allows the cover to drape in an aesthetic manner over a furniture article. It is desirable that the solution does not significantly alter the flexibility or usability of the protective cover while at the same time it securely retains the cover on the furniture article.

SUMMARY

[0006] According to the present invention there is provided furniture protectors having retention straps for securing the protector to the furniture.

[0007] The anti-slip protective cover may be suitable for use with various furniture articles, such as couches, loveseats, chairs, ottomans, or the like. The anti-slip protective cover protects the outer surface of furniture. In accordance with various embodiments, the anti-slip protective cover includes a first layer formed of a protective material and a second layer formed of an anti-slip material. The cover also includes a retention tie connected to at least one of the first layer or the second layer. The retention tie is operable to extend around a first portion of the furniture article such that the retention tie operably anchors the first layer and the second layer to the furniture article. The retention tie is attached to at least one of the first layer or the second layer such that the anti-slip material of the second layer is held against the first portion of the furniture article such that the friction between the anti-slip material and the furniture article limits relative movement between the cover and the furniture article.

[0008] In accordance with various embodiments, the cover may also include a plurality of retention ties. At least some of the plurality of retention ties may extend transversely across a portion of the central region such that at least one of the plurality of retention ties is operable to extend around a first seat cushion with another one of the plurality of retention ties being operable to extend around a second seat cushion. At least some of the plurality of retention ties may extend latterly across a portion of the central region extending around one or more seat cushions. At least one retention tie of the plurality of retention ties may extend across a portion of the central region in a direction different than a second retention tie of the plurality of retention ties such that the separate retention ties cross one another. A second retention tie may be configured to extend around a back rest of the furniture article, such that the cover operable to be anchored to the back rest and the one or more seat cushions.

[0009] In accordance with various embodiments, the retention tie is elastic with sufficient length to stretch around the one or more cushions. The retention tie may be connected to the cover at opposite ends of the central portion in a transverse or lateral direction ends. The retention tie may be a strap. A portion of the retention tie may be detachable by hand from the cover. The retention tie may be detachably connected to the cover by a fastener engaged with a loop on a strap portion. The fastener includes a hook portion on one portion of the retention tie operable to engage a loop portion on another portion of the retention strap. Each end of the retention tie may include a fastener such that the portion of the retention tie that is removable from the cover is a middle portion of the retention tie. The retention tie is adjustable in length to fit around different sizes and lengths of cushions.

[0010] In accordance with various embodiments, the anti-slip protective cover includes a layer having a peripheral region surrounding an interior portion and a plurality of different panels extending in separate directions from a central region with the central region operable to extend over a seat portion. The different panels are operable to extend over a back portion, and arm portions of a chair or couch. The cover includes a plurality of retention ties connected to the layer with at least a first retention tie of the plurality of retention ties extending across a portion of the central region in a direction different than a second retention tie of the plurality of retention ties such that the first and second retention ties cross one another.

[0011] In accordance various embodiments, the plurality of retention ties are sufficiently long to extend around one or more seat cushions forming a part of the furniture article such that the retention ties operably anchor the cover to the one or more seat cushions. The retention ties are attached to the layer such that an anti-slip material is held against the one or more seat cushions causing the friction between the anti-slip material and the seat cushions limits relative movement between the layer and the seat cushions. The connection is a connective material that is arranged in intervals extending across a portion of the interior portion of the anti-slip material and the protective material.

[0012] In accordance with various embodiments, the anti-slip protective cover includes a first layer formed of a protective material and a second layer formed of an anti-slip material having a peripheral region surrounding an interior portion. The cover may also include a second layer formed of an anti-slip material. The anti-slip material may have a peripheral region surrounding an interior portion. The cover may also include a retention tie connected to at least one of the first layer or the second layer. The retention tie may operable to bias the anti-slip material against a portion of the furniture article increasing the friction between the anti-slip material and the furniture article to limit relative movement between the cover and the furniture article.

[0013] Additional embodiments and features are set forth in part in the description that follows, and will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon examination of the specification or may be learned by the practice of the disclosed subject matter. A further understanding of the nature and advantages of the present disclosure may be realized by reference to the remaining portions of the specification and the drawings, which forms a part of this disclosure. One of skill in the art will understand that each of the various aspects and features of the disclosure may advantageously be used separately in some instances, or in combination with other aspects and features of the disclosure in other instances.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0014] The description will be more fully understood with reference to the following figures, which are presented as various embodiments of the disclosure and should not be construed as a complete recitation of the scope of the disclosure, characterized in that:

[0015] FIG. 1A is a front perspective view of a furniture article with protective cover thereon in accordance with various embodiments;

[0016] FIG. 1B is a rear perspective view of a furniture article with protective cover thereon in accordance with various embodiments;

[0017] FIG. 1C is a front perspective view of a furniture article showing retention straps fastened to the cushions of the furniture article;

[0018] FIG. 2 is a top view of a protective cover in accordance with various embodiments;

[0019] FIG. 3 is a bottom view of a protective cover in accordance with various embodiments;

[0020] FIGS. 4A-E are bottom views of various protective covers illustrating connecting-material arrangements; and

[0021] FIG. 5 is a cross section view taken along section line 5-5 shown in FIG. 4D.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0022] The subject matter of the disclosure herein may be described and implemented in various configurations and embodiments, and some particular embodiments may be described for purposes of explanation and illustration. It is to be understood, however, that other embodiments are within the scope of the invention.

[0023] FIG. 1A illustrates a perspective view of a furniture article 5 with and embodiment of a protective cover 10 thereon in accordance with various embodiments. As shown, the protective cover 10 may be drapable over a furniture article 5 such that the frequently used areas of the furniture article 5 are covered by the protective cover 10, thereby reducing wear and tear on the furniture article. For example, the protective cover 10 may extend over one or more of the seat, leg area (as used herein the leg area also reference generally to any draped portion that could extend down from the main panel in the absence of other features like legs, arms, or a back on the furniture), arms, or back of the furniture article 5. Areas of coverage may also or instead be selected for changing their appearance or texture.

[0024] As shown in FIGS. 1A and 2, the protective cover 10 may have one or more panels to cover the various portions of the furniture article 5. For example, the protective cover 10 may have a seat panel 12 positioned to cover the seat portion of the furniture article 5. The protective cover 10 may have a back panel 18 positioned to cover the back portion of the furniture article 5. The protective cover 10 may have a leg panel 14 positioned to cover the lower portion of the furniture article 5 on which legs may contact and apply wear and tear. The protective cover 10 may have one or more arm panels 16a, 16b positioned to cover the arm portion of the furniture article 5.

[0025] Each panel of the protective cover 10 can be made of a separate panel sewn to one or more of the other panels or each panel can be a part of a larger fabric panel forming the main portion of the protective cover (e.g., the seat panel 12). As illustrated in the examples below, a single fabric panel of continuous weave can include two furniture portion panels, such as the seat and leg panels; or alternatively, these can be made of panels of continuous weave, connected together such as by sewing or other suitable method. Additionally, each furniture panel can be made of a single manufactured panel or of multiple, independently manufactured panels that are attached to each other.

[0026] In accordance with various embodiments, and shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, the protective cover 5 may have a central panel. The central panel, depending on size or orientation, may be configured and operable as any of the above mentioned panels. In one example, the central panel may be the seat panel 12. One or more panels may extend from the central panel either laterally (e.g., arm to arm) or transversely (e.g., foot to back). For example, a back panel 18 may extend transversely from one edge of the seat panel 12. The back panel 18 and the seat panel 12 may be connected along a connecting seam 34. In one example, a leg panel 14 may extend along one side of the seat panel. The leg panel may also be connected to the seat panel 12 along connecting seam 34 or may be a contiguous portion of the seat panel 12. In another example, arm panels 16a, 16b may extend laterally from the seat panel 12. These arm panels 16a and 16b may likewise be connected along a seam 34 on each lateral end of the seat portion.

[0027] In various embodiments, one or more of the back panel 18, the leg panel 12, or the arm panels 16a, 16b may form a contiguous portion of the seat panel 12. In such embodiments, the cover may be sufficiently sized to extend over the back of furniture article 5, over the seat of furniture article 5 toward the floor, and/or laterally over the arms. Any one of the panels may extend any suitable length to provide a desired level of coverage of its corresponding furniture portion. For example, the seat panel or the main panel may extend about 80%, 90%, or 100% over the main area of the furniture (e.g., the seat of a chair or the table top of a table). Likewise the tertiary panels, e.g., the arm panels, the leg panels, or the back panels, if present, may extend between 10-100% over their respective areas of the furniture. For example, the leg panel 12 may extend to a desired length relative to the floor or down from the seat portion. For example, the leg panel may end approximately 8'' from the floor. Alternatively, the leg panel 12 may extend all the way to the floor. In various embodiments, the protective cover may be limited to extending over one or two elements of the future article such as the seat portion and armrest, the seat portion and the backrest, the seat portion and the leg portion, or any other combination of furniture article elements. In various embodiments, the protective cover may extend over three or more of the elements in any combination. In various embodiments, the protective cover may extend over all wear and tear surfaces of the furniture article such as the backrest, the armrests, and the seat. The protective cover may include a draped portion extending down from the main panel (e.g., the seat portion).

[0028] In the furniture industry, furniture articles are made in a variety of sizes. For example, common configurations include chair, loveseat, and sofa size furniture articles. The protective cover as disclosed herein, however, may be applicable to varied types of furniture of different sizes, including tables, counters, benches, or the like. However, as way of example, it may be noted that for typical furniture, the protective cover may typically have a transverse width of about 75 inches and a lateral width L (as shown in FIG. 2) of about 65 inches to 120 inches, with chair sizes being closer to the 65 inch side of the range and couches being closer to the 120 inch side of the range, with loveseats being between. However, the furniture may be any width.

[0029] Each protective cover 10 may have a peripheral region 11 (also referred to as the periphery 11) and an interior portion 13, surrounded by the peripheral region 11. The peripheral edge 11 may be that portion of the protective cover 10 that is proximal to the peripheral region. The interior portion 13 may be the portion of the protective cover 10 that lies within the peripheral edge 11. In one example, the peripheral edge 11 may be considered the portion of the protective cover 10 having a finished edge 32 wherein the protective material 20 is folded back on itself along the peripheral region. The interior portion 13 may be areas of the protective cover 10 central to this feature.

[0030] In accordance with various embodiments, the protective cover 10 may be configured such that slippage on the furniture article 5 is minimized. As shown in FIG. 3, depicting a bottom view of a protective cover 10, the protective cover 10 may include a top layer 20 and a bottom layer 30 of material. The top layer 20 and the bottom layer 30 may be connected to one another at their respective peripheries 11 and/or their interiors 13. Such connections are discussed in more detail below.

[0031] In accordance with various embodiments, the top layer 20 or the cover layer may be the layer in direct contact with the user of the protective cover 10. This top layer 20 may be a protective material that may be operable to reduce the wear and tear discussed above. This protective material may have characteristics that provide equal to or greater protection or wear resistance as compared to the furniture material itself. However, in some embodiments, the protective material may have relatively weak protective or wear resistance characteristics but may still serve as a sacrificial layer for the furniture. Regardless of the heightened or lowered protective qualities of the top layer it may be referred to herein as a protective layer. This protective material is also shown for example in FIGS. 1A and 2. For example, the material may be made from a micro-suede product. Such a material may be knitted from 75 D.times.T225 D sea island filaments. Other materials may be used, however, such as natural materials (e.g., leathers, cottons, linins etc.) or synthetic materials (e.g., acetate, acrylic, nylon, polyester, rayon, etc.) These materials may be woven, knitted, non-woven, or a hybrid. For example, a natural material may be a polycotton blend or a synthetic material may be a polyrayon blend. Any hybrids or non-hybrids may be used.

[0032] Another layer 30 may be formed by an anti-slip material. The anti-slip material 30 may extend over a sufficient portion of the protective material 20 such that the movement of the protective cover 10 (over/across the surface of) the furniture article 5 is minimized. By increasing the coverage of the anti-slip material 30 relative to the protective material 20, the likelihood that pressure from a user of the protective cover 10 will force the anti-slip material 30 against the surface of the furniture article 5 and resist or stop sliding these between increases. In accordance with various embodiments, the anti-slip material 30 may extend over more than 1/4 of the protective material. In some embodiments, the anti-slip material 30 may extend over more than half of the protective material 20. In some embodiments, the anti-slip material 30 may extend over between 50% and 95% of the protective material 20. In various embodiments, the anti-slip material 30 may be substantially co-extensive with the protective material 20.

[0033] The anti-slip material 30 may have a suitably high coefficient of friction to minimize sliding of the protective cover 10. For example, the anti-slip material 30 on the surface of furniture article 5 particularly has a coefficient of friction that is significantly greater than the protective material 20 on the surface of the same furniture article 5. To achieve this or a similar desired coefficient of friction increases, a variety of materials can be used. The anti-slip material 30 may be made from any of a variety of polymers, fabrics (natural or synthetic), and composites of the two or other materials offering anti-slip properties. For example, a mesh material may be formed via a polymer or polymer fabric mesh and then sewn to the protective cover 10. In one example, the anti-slip material 30 may be made from a polymer-coated mesh fabric. In one example, the polymer may be a polyvinyl chloride (pvc) coating that coats a fabric such as a polyester mesh. In another example, the polymer may be an acrylonitrile-styrene resin that coats the same or similar type mesh fabric. However, it may be noted that any anti-slip material may be used to form the bottom layer 30. Other materials may include silicones, rubbers, polymers, other artificial materials or natural fibers. In one example, a mesh of adhesive may be formed by designing the mesh with an adhesive and then allowing it to dry. The dried adhesive may then form the anti-slip layer and be sewn to the protective layer forming the protective cover.

[0034] The cover 10 may be held in position on the furniture article 5 in a variety of manners. For example, the anti-slip layer 30 provides friction to limit movement of the cover 10 relative to the furniture article 5. In another example, one or more retention ties (e.g., 60a, 62a, 64a, 66a, or 68a) are connected to the cover 10 via at least one of the protective layer 20 or the anti-slip layer 30. With regards to embodiments having the retention tie, the cover 10 can include a single layer of material (e.g. the protective layer 20 or the anti-slip layer 30) or multiple layers of material. The retention tie (e.g., 60a, 62a, 64a, 66a, or 68a) is positioned to extend around a portion of the furniture article 5. By extending around the portion of the furniture article 5, the retention tie (e.g., 60a, 62a, 64a, 66a, or 68a) anchors the cover 10 to the furniture article 5. The retention tie is attached to at least one of the protective layer 20 or the anti-slip layer 30 such that the anti-slip material of the anti-slip layer 30 is held against the first portion of the furniture article increasing the friction between the anti-slip material and the furniture article, thereby limiting relative movement between the cover and the furniture article.

[0035] Any number of retention ties may be used. In one example, the anti-slip material may be solely relied on to limit relative movement between cover 10 and the furniture article 5. In another example, a single retention tie may be used (e.g., 60a or 62a). While in other examples, a plurality of retention ties (e.g., 60a, 62a, 64a, 66a, or 68a) may be attached to the cover 5. When multiple retention ties are used, the different retention ties may secure the cover 5 at different locations or to different portions of the furniture article 5. As illustrated in the examples depicted in FIGS. 1B and 1C, the furniture article 5 includes various portions to which the cover 10 can be secured. For example, one portion may be one or more cushions 6, as shown in FIG. 1C. In another example, the portion may be the back support 7 of the furniture article 5 as shown in FIG. 1B. Other portions may include the arms, the seat, legs, or a base portion. The various retention ties may be positioned on the cover 10 in locations that allow the cover to be secured to the intended portions of furniture article 5. As discussed herein, the cover 10, which includes the protective layer 20 and the anti-slip layer 30 may also include different panels extending from a central region. The central region may include the seat panel 12 with additional panels extending therefrom which may extend over the back portion and arm portions of the furniture article 5.

[0036] In accordance with various embodiments, one or more retention ties (e.g., 64a, 66a, and 68a) extend transversely across a portion of the central region, for example the seat panel 12. The cover 10 may include the same number of transverse retention ties such that a separate retention tie is operable to extend around a separate seat cushion 6. In this way, each seat cushion 6 secures the cover 10 to the furniture article 5. In accordance with various embodiments, one or more retention ties (e.g., retention tie 62a) extend laterally across a portion of the central region, for example, the seat panel 12. The retention tie 62a is of sufficient length to extend around a portion of the furniture article 5 such as a cushion. Alternatively, the retention tie 62a extends around successive portions such as multiple cushions 6 or all of the cushions 6 as shown in FIG. 1C. As shown in FIG. 3, the plurality of retention ties (e.g., 62a, 64a, 66a, and 68a) may all be present together, such that various retention ties extend in different directions as compared to other retention ties located in the same region of the cover 10. As indicated some ties may extend transversely (e.g., ties 64a, 66a, and 68a) and some ties may extend laterally (e.g., tie 62a). In one example, the different ties extending in different directions are separate from one another and independently movable. In another example, the ties are connected to each other either permanently or detachably. The various retention ties may extend in other directions that provide improved engagement between the cover 10 and the furniture article 5.

[0037] In accordance with various embodiments, one or more retention ties (e.g., 60a) extend transversely across a portion of the furniture article such as the back rest 7. The retention tie 60a may extend around the back rest 7 such that the anti-slip material is held against the furniture article 5 thereby increasing the friction between the anti-slip material and the furniture article 5 to limit relative movement between the cover and the furniture article. As the back panel 18 may be configured to extend over and drape back across the back rest 7, the retention tie 60a may extend transversely across the back panel 18 such that the retention tie 60a is operable to extend across the front of the back rest 7 pulling the cover 10 against the back of back rest 7 as shown in FIG. 1B. Other configurations of the back panel 18 and the retention tie 60a are also envisioned herein for example, the retention tie 60a may extend around the back of the back rest 7 pulling the cover 10 against the front of the back rest 7. Alternatively, two different portions of the back panel 18 may be connected on the transverse sides of the back panel 18 such that the back panel 18 forms a pocket that can be pulled down and over the back rest 7. The retention ties may be utilized to extend around multiple portions of the furniture article. For example tie 60a may extend around the back rest portion 7 and the tie or ties 62a, 64a, 66a, and 68a may extend around the cushion portion 6 of the furniture article.

[0038] In accordance with another embodiment, the retention tie 60a increases the friction between the back panel 18 and the back rest 7 by engaging with one or more of retention loops 63a-c. The retention loops 63a-c may be positioned on the back panel 18. For example, either a single loop engages the retention tie 60a or a pair of loops engages the retention tie 60a, such as loops 63a, loops 63b, or loops 63c. While FIG. 3 is shown with three loop pairs 63a, 63b, and 63c, this merely by way of example as in one embodiment a single loop is used. Alternatively, in another embodiment, a single loop pair is used. In yet another embodiment, a plurality of loops or loop pairs are used. The loops 63a-c are utilized to increase the friction between the back panel 18 and the back rest 7 on both the front of the back rest 7 and on the back of the back rest 7. In one example, the retention tie 60a is attached to the back panel via attachments 60e on the lateral sides of the pack panel 18. The retention loops are located a transverse distance from the retention tie 60a. As shown in FIG. 3, the loops can be located at the lateral sides of the back panel 18. In other embodiments, the loops are additionally or alternatively located at various locations along the interior space of the back panel. The transverse distance is a distance that allows the retention tie 60a and the retention loops 63a-c to be located respectively along the transverse distance of the back panel 18 such that when the back panel 18 is laid over a back rest 7, the retention tie 60a and the retention loops 63a-c are located on opposite sides of the back rest from one another. In this position, the retention tie 60a is able to pass thorough one or more of the loops 63a-c as the retention tie 60a extends around the back rest 7. By engaging the retention tie 60a with the loops 63a-c, the retention loops are able to bias the back panel 18 toward the back rest 7. In this way, the connection between the retention tie 60a and the back panel 18 biases the back panel 18 to the back rest 7 on a first side when the retention tie 60a is extended around the back rest 7 and the retention loops 63a-c variously anchor the back panel 18 to the retention tie 60a on a second side of the back rest 7. By biasing the back rest on each of the two sides of the back rest 7, friction between the back rest 7 and the back panel 18 is increased.

[0039] In accordance with various embodiments, the back panel 18 may include multiple pairs of retention loops 63a-c. Each of the multiple pairs of retention loops may be positioned at different traverse locations on the back panel 18. By locating these retention loops at different locations, the back panel 18 is adaptable to different furniture having different heights of back rests. For example, a low back rest 7 can utilize retention loops 63c, a medium height back rest 7 can utilize retention loops 63b, and a tall back rest can utilize retention loops 63a.

[0040] FIG. 3 illustrates the retention tie 60a being closer to the seat panel 12 than the retention loops 63a-c. However, in other embodiments, the retention loops 63a-c may be located closer to the seat panel 12 than the retention tie 60a. In this embodiment, the retention tie 60a may extend forward from the back panel 18 around the front of the back rest 7 and through the retention loops, which are located in such and embodiment proximal to the front of the back rest 7. The retention loops 63a-c are connected to any one of the various panels on the cover. In one example, the connection may be a fixed connection via a sewn stitch, staple, adhesive or other similar fixed connections located at a seam or across the interior surface of a panel. In another example, the connection may be a removable connection via a fastener such as a button, snap, hook and loop, a tie or other similar removably attached connections. The retention loops 63a-c can be formed from a variety of materials including fabric or non-woven straps, string, elastic or similar type structures. Additionally or alternatively, the retention loops 63a-c can be hardware such as rings, wires, ties, or other suitable hardware.

[0041] While the various embodiments of the retention loops 63a-c are discussed herein with respect to the loops being positioned to be utilized with a furniture back rest 7, it should be appreciated that the loops may be positioned on or relative to any other panel to allow for other retention straps to engage the loops and secure the cover to both sides of other furniture portions. For example, loops could be located on the leg panel 14 and engage with the retention strap 62a by folding the leg panel 14 under the seat cushions. Additionally or alternatively, a panel extending from between the back panel 18 and the seat panel 12 could tuck under the seat cushions and this panel would also benefit from the retention loops being located thereon.

[0042] In accordance with various embodiments, the retention tie is formed of a material in a shape or form operable to connect, attach or secure the cover 10 to a portion of the furniture article 5. In some examples, the retention tie is a flexible material such as an elastic material. An elastic material can automatically tighten from an elongated length to a shorter on. As such, as long as the portion of the furniture article 5 enclosed in the elastic material has a size between the minimum and maximum lengths of the elastic material then the elasticity will collapse the length of the tie to secure it to the furniture article 5. Alternatively, the retention tie is an inelastic having features to tighten the retention tie as opposed to relying on its change in length due to flexibility. The retention tie may include combinations of materials and properties. The retention tie may be a thread, string, cable, strap, band, or other suitable structure operable to secure the cover 10. For example, the retention tie may be a strap that forms an aesthetically pleasing appearance with the furniture article.

[0043] In one example, the retention tie is connected to the cover at a seam between panels. In another example, the retention tie is connected to the panel surface. The retention tie may also be connected in a combination of these methods or in other methods as would be understood by a person of ordinary skill in the art.

[0044] In accordance with various embodiments, a portion of the retention tie is removable by hand from the cover. In this way, the retention tie may be formed of multiple parts. For example, the retention tie may include fastener (e.g., 60b, 62b, 64b, 66b, and 68b) suitable to disengage and reengage the retention tie with the cover 10. Examples of fasteners may include hook and loop type fasteners (e.g., Velcro), hardware style fasteners (e.g., buttons, snaps, zippers, buckles etc.). In one specific example, one portion of the tie may include a male engagement such as a plastic hook with an opposing portion of the tie forming a female engagement such as a loop on the end of the tie portion. In various embodiments, each end of the retention tie includes a fastener such that a middle portion of the retention tie is fully detachable from the cover via the removable fastener such that the retention tie may be removed. As shown in FIG. 3, one end of the retention tie 62a includes a fastener 62b and the other end includes fastener 62d. The two fasteners may be the same type or they may be different types. In embodiments, having a plurality of retention ties, some or all of the ties may also be detachable have fasteners on each end.

[0045] In embodiments, with retention ties being multiple parts, the fasteners (e.g., 60b, 62b, 64b, 66b, and 68b) are attached to the removable portion of the retention tie (e.g. 60a, 62a, 64a, 66a, and 68a). The removable portions of the retention tie are connected to a fixed portion of the retention tie (e.g. 60e, 62e, 64e, 66e, and 68e). In some embodiments, the fixed portion of the retention tie is formed of the same material as the removable portions of the retention tie. In other embodiments, the fixed portion of the retention tie is a different material, such as a hardware portion that is attached to the panel portions of the cover. In one example, the fixed portion (e.g. 60e, 62e, 64e, 66e, and 68e) is a short elastic loop operable to receive hardware such as a hook attached to the retention tie (e.g. 60a, 62a, 64a, 66a, and 68a).

[0046] In accordance with various embodiments, the retention ties (e.g., 60a, 62a, 64a, 66a, or 68a) are adjustable in length. As indicated above, the retention ties may be flexible such that the retention ties are adjustable in length due to their flexible nature. Additionally or alternatively, the retention ties may include length adjusting hardware or structure. For example, each retention tie may include a buckle (e.g., 60c, 62c, 64c, 66c, or 68c) operable to allow changes in the length of the retention tie. In another example, the retention tie may have a hook and loop surface with a return loop allowing the tie to double back on itself and adjusting its length by engaging the hook surface with the loop surface (e.g., Velcro.)

[0047] In accordance with various embodiments, as shown in FIGS. 1A-3, the movement between the anti-slip material 30 and the protective material 20 may be minimized or negated by including attachment locations between the anti-slip material 30 and the protective material 20. The attachment locations 40 may be formed by any suitable device, method or material that connects the protective layer and the anti-slip layer. In various embodiments, the attachment locations may be formed by direct attachment of the two layers. This direct attachment may be made by welding one layer to the other. For example, the anti-slip layer may be made entirely of or partly of an elastomer that could be adhered or melted to the anti-slip layer. In another embodiment, the attachment locations may be formed by a connecting material 40. For example, the connecting material 40 may be a stitching material used to sew or quilt one layer to the other. The stitching material may be any type of thread. In various examples, the thread may be similar in consistency, texture, color, or other characteristic as the protective layer or the second layer. Examples of these threads may include a thread formed of the same or similar material as the protective layer. In other examples, these threads may include a thread formed of the same or similar material as the anti-slip layer. In one example, polyester thread may be used in any of the various embodiments providing good strength while being inexpensive. In another example, the connecting material 40 may be an adhesive that binds the protective layer to the anti-slip layer. Adhesives may include traditional fabric glues, two sided tape, or strips of adhesive (as opposed to allover fabric coverage). In various embodiments, a laminate may be used. The laminate, however, may glue significant portions of the two fabrics together. Other adhesive method might include applying heat to the two fabrics so that they fuse. Another adhesive method may include using pinsonic quilting (which is high frequency sound waves plus rollers which put pressure between the two fabrics together). Another adhesive method may include hook and loop fasteners (e.g., Velcro).

[0048] Other connecting materials may include staples, adhesive, or similar types of mechanisms that can attach the layers of material together. The application may make reference to connecting material but it may be noted that this is merely by way of example, while each embodiment may also include the direct attachment or any form of attachment or embodiment of attachments disclosed herein.

[0049] In various embodiments, the attachment locations (e.g., connecting material 22, 24, 25, 26, 27 as shown in FIGS. 4A-4E) may be spacing from one another. The positioning of the attachment locations with the spacing may be arranged across one or more directions of the material. An example of an arrangement in two directions would be a quilting pattern of attachments locations connecting anti-slip layer and the protective layer. In this way an attachment may extend from edge to edge of the cover or only a partial distance across the cover connecting the layers with a parallel attachment spaced apart from the first attachment with an unattached portion 50 extending between the two attached portions. In a different direction a similar arrangement may occur, with an angled attachment extending all the way or part way across the cover connecting the layers. This angled attachment being positioned at an angle to the first attachment. The angled attachment may also have a parallel attachment extending across or part way across the cover immediately adjacent two it. Each of the parallel attachments may have a space therebetween with the materials not being attached. The intervals of attached layers and unattached layers may provide a sufficiently discontinuous arrangement on the cover, such that it does not significantly modify the flexibility or rigidity of the protective cover 10. Each of the unattached portions 50 may be of sufficient size such that the flexibility of the cover 10 is not significantly modified. For example, in a quilted arrangement the unattached areas may be defined on each side by attached locations. In any of the various embodiments, parallel attached locations may define some portion of the unattached area between the layers. In various examples, the unattached portion 50 may be between 1/5 the lateral distance W or transverse length T of the cover and 1/30 of the lateral length W or transverse length T of the cover. In various embodiments, the unattached locations may extend between 2-10 inches in the lateral length and between 2-10 inches in the transverse length.

[0050] The connecting material may be discontinuous in one or more of two dimensional directions of the layers. The connecting material may, for example, be continuous in a lateral direction at various intervals but be discontinuous in the transverse direction as shown in FIG. 4B. Or, the connecting material may, for example, be continuous in a transverse direction at various intervals but be discontinuous in the lateral direction as shown in FIG. 4A. A combination of these two patterns may form a quilting pattern as shown in FIG. 4D. In this way the connecting material may form attached and unattached portions of the two layers at intervals across the cover in multiple directions. Each interval of unattached materials may be of other suitable sizes. The unattached portions may be increased in size by having the intervals between connecting materials increased. Conversely, the unattached portions may be decreased in size by having the intervals between the connecting materials decreased. By having the intervals of attached portions and unattached portions the flexibility is improved over the anti-slip layer continuously attached to the protective layer such as in laminating or gluing of the anti-slip layer to the protective layer.

[0051] For example, separate discrete dollops of adhesive (see connections 47, e.g., FIG. 4E) may be used to form separate discrete connection points between the protective layer 20 and the anti-slip layer 30. In another embodiment, separate discrete stitches may connect the protective layer 20 and the anti-slip layer 30. In another example, the connection between the protective layer 20 and the anti-slip layer 30 may be continuous for at least a short distance. The length of the continuous connection point may be minimized for an adhesive as it may affect the flexibility or the rigidity of the protective cover 10. In some embodiments the stitching material may extend across only a potion or across a few different portions of the cover 10. In other embodiments, the stitching material may extend all the way across or around the protective cover 10.

[0052] In accordance with various embodiments, as shown in FIGS. 1-4, the connecting material may form a connected periphery 22 between the protective layer 20 and the anti-slip layer 30. In accordance with various embodiments, the connecting material may also be located at the interior of the protective layer 20 and the anti-slip layer 30 forming an interior connection (e.g., 24, 25, 26, 27 of FIGS. 4A-E) between the two layers. By connecting the two layers at their respective interiors, movement between the two layers is minimized, negating need to increase the coefficient of friction between the two materials. Regardless of the locations of the connection material 40, it may be placed discretely or continuously. For example, the protective layer 20 and the anti-slip layer 30 may be connected by the connecting material 40 around the periphery with either discrete connection points or continuous expanse of connection material. Similarly, the protective layer 20 and the anti-slip layer 30 may be connected with either discrete connection points or a continuous expanse of connection material across the interior of the protective cover 10.

[0053] FIGS. 4A-E are various bottom views of protective covers illustrating various connecting material arrangements in accordance with various embodiments. In various examples, the protective layer and the anti-slip layer may be quilted together, with connection material extending in multiple directions across the cover 10. FIGS. 1, 2, 3 and 4D illustrate this configuration. FIG. 4A illustrates another example with connection material 24 extending transversely across the cover 10, with each portion of connection material extending in the same directions. In still another example, the connection material 26 may extend in a lateral direction as shown in FIG. 4B. In yet another example, the connection material 25 may include both a transverse component and a lateral component as shown in FIG. 4C. In another example, the protective layer and the anti-slip layer may be connected with discrete connections 27 as shown in FIG. 4E. As shown in each of these particular examples, the protective cover is formed from the protective layer and the anti-slip layer, which are connected at both their periphery and their interior.

[0054] As illustrated in FIG. 5, which is a schematic cross section of a protective cover such as that shown in FIG. 4D across cross section line 5-5, a protective cover 10 may include the plurality of attachment locations 40. These attachment locations may be mere contact points between the layers (e.g., such as when to materials are sewn together) or the attachment locations may be fixed attachments such as welding or adhesive. As shown in this example, a connective thread 24 may extend between the two layers 20, 30 to attach them. Unattached portions 50 may be located between the attachment points. The layers are shown with no contact along this unattached region 50 in FIG. 5, this is to illustrate their unattached nature allowing them to move freely from one another. However, the layers may maintain full contact along these regions as well. The periphery of the cover 5 may have a finished edge 32 having an attachment shown by the connecting thread 22.

[0055] In accordance with various embodiments, the stitched connection material may be sewn into the protective layer 20 and the anti-slip layer 30. Traditional furniture fabric stitching machines have been found by the inventor to be unable to handle the 200 cm width fabrics. Also, quilting the protective cover 10 increases the stress on sewing needles significantly. When using insufficiently capable needles, the needles would overheat and break going through both the anti-slip material and the protective layer. Traditional quilting machines proved insufficient at handling the stress on the needle. The use of traditional quilting machines, e.g., multi-needle sewing machines, caused excessive needle breakage in sewing through PVC-coated mesh fabric that is layered with a protective cover. As such, sewing through 2 layers of the anti-skid material and 2 layers of the protective material (see, e.g., seams 34) proved too much for quilting-style sewing machines. To overcome the deficiencies of traditional quilting machines, a wide multi-needle quilting machine with larger needles may be used to attach the protective layer to the anti-slip layer (e.g., the protective fabric to the anti-slip backing). Also, a side hem or binding may be sewn around the periphery connection 22 on the protective cover without experiencing significant broken needles. Similarly, seam 34 may be sewn without experiencing a significant number of broken needles. A larger gauge needle in the single-needle sewing machine may be used to sew through four layers of fabric at, for example, the seams 34. For example, sewing machines for industrial carpet-manufacture may be used to stitch the protective layer to the anti-slip layer, particularly at the seams 34. The carpet-style sewing machine is also sufficient to handle the 200 cm width fabrics used to form the protective cover 10.

[0056] In accordance with various other embodiments, the protective layer and the anti-slip layer may be laminated together, but his often causes a significant stiffening of the protective cover in its multi-layer regions. In such an embodiment extensive adhesives, temperatures, and/or pressures may be used to laminate the protective layer to the anti-slip layer. In various embodiments, the anti-slip material may be printed directly to the protective material in the form of discrete dots. In various embodiments, the anti-slip material may be attached by a hook and loop fastener system to the protective material. In various embodiments, the protective material may be impregnated or embossed with anti-slip materials.

[0057] Having described several embodiments herein, it will be recognized by those skilled in the art that various modifications, alternative constructions, and equivalents may be used. The various examples and embodiments may be employed separately or they may be mixed and matched in combination to form any iteration of the alternatives. Additionally, a number of well-known processes and elements have not been described in order to avoid unnecessarily obscuring the present invention. Accordingly, the above description should not be taken as not limiting the scope of the invention.

[0058] Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the presently disclosed embodiments teach by way of example and not by limitation. Therefore, the matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings should be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense. The following claims are intended to cover all generic and specific features described herein, as well as all statements of the scope of the present method and system, which, as a matter of language, might be said to fall there between.

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