Easy To Use Patents Search & Patent Lawyer Directory

At Patents you can conduct a Patent Search, File a Patent Application, find a Patent Attorney, or search available technology through our Patent Exchange. Patents are available using simple keyword or date criteria. If you are looking to hire a patent attorney, you've come to the right place. Protect your idea and hire a patent lawyer.


Search All Patents:



  This Patent May Be For Sale or Lease. Contact Us

  Is This Your Patent? Claim This Patent Now.



Register or Login To Download This Patent As A PDF




United States Patent Application 20170342109
Kind Code A1
Carroll; Michael C. ;   et al. November 30, 2017

Natural IGM Antibodies and Inhibitors Thereof

Abstract

The invention provides natural IgM antibody inhibitors that may be used to treat various inflammatory diseases or disorders.


Inventors: Carroll; Michael C.; (Wellesley, MA) ; Moore, JR.; Francis D.; (Medfield, MA) ; Hechtman; Herbert B.; (Chestnut Hill, MA)
Applicant:
Name City State Country Type

Children's Medical Center Corporation
President and Fellows of Harvard College
The Brigham and Women`s Hospital, Inc.

Boston
Cambridge
Boston

MA
MA
MA

US
US
US
Family ID: 1000002797421
Appl. No.: 15/588933
Filed: May 8, 2017


Related U.S. Patent Documents

Application NumberFiling DatePatent Number
13859054Apr 9, 20139657060
15588933
12259767Oct 28, 2008
13859054
11069834Mar 1, 20057442783
12259767
60588648Jul 16, 2004
60549123Mar 1, 2004

Current U.S. Class: 1/1
Current CPC Class: C07K 2317/52 20130101; C07K 2317/34 20130101; C07K 7/08 20130101; C07K 16/00 20130101; A61K 2039/57 20130101; C07K 16/28 20130101; A61K 38/00 20130101; A61K 39/00 20130101; A61K 2039/505 20130101; C07K 16/18 20130101
International Class: C07K 7/08 20060101 C07K007/08; C07K 16/28 20060101 C07K016/28; C07K 16/00 20060101 C07K016/00; C07K 16/18 20060101 C07K016/18

Goverment Interests



1. GOVERNMENT SUPPORT

[0002] This invention was made with government support under grant No. GM52585, GM24891, and GM07560 from the National Institutes of Health. The government has certain rights in the invention.
Claims



1.-47. (canceled)

48. An inhibitor of natural IgM antibodies, wherein the inhibitor is an isolated antibody or antigen-binding fragment thereof that inhibits binding of a natural IgM antibody to a self-antigen.

49. The inhibitor of claim 48, wherein the antibody or antigen-binding fragment thereof inhibits complement activation.

50. The inhibitor of claim 48, wherein the natural IgM antibody is a pathogenic antibody.

51. The inhibitor of claim 48, wherein the inhibitor is an isolated antibody or antigen-binding fragment thereof that competes with natural IgMs in binding to the self-antigen.

52. The inhibitor of claim 51, wherein the isolated antibody or antigen-binding fragment thereof blocks binding of a natural IgM antibody to a self-antigen and inhibits complement activation.

53. The inhibitor of claim 51, wherein the self-antigen comprises the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:38.

54. The inhibitor of claim 51, wherein the antibody inhibits the binding of natural IgM antibody IgM.sup.CM-22 to the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:38.

55. The inhibitor of claim 51, wherein the antibody is a monoclonal antibody.

56. The inhibitor of claim 55, wherein the antibody is selected from the group consisting chimeric, CDR-grafted, and humanized antibodies.

57. The inhibitor of claim 48, wherein the inhibitor is an antigen-binding fragment.

58. The inhibitor of claim 57, wherein antigen binding fragment is a Fab fragment, a F(ab').sub.2 fragment, or scFv fragment.

59. The inhibitor of claim 48, wherein the antibody comprises an antigen-binding fragment of natural IgM antibody IgM.sup.CM-22.

60. A method of for treating an inflammatory condition in a subject in need thereof comprising administering to said subject an effective amount of the antibody of claim 48.

61. The method of claim 60, wherein the inflammatory condition is selected from the group consisting of reperfusion injury, ischemia injury, stroke, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease, hyper-IgM immunodeficiency, arteriosclerosis, coronary artery disease, sepsis, myocarditis, encephalitis, transplant rejection, hepatitis, thyroiditis, osteoporosis, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, Type I diabetes, gout, dermatitis, alopecia areata, systemic lupus erythematosus, lichen sclerosis, ulcerative colitis, diabetic retinopathy, pelvic inflammatory disease, periodontal disease, arthritis, juvenile chronic arthritis, psoriasis, osteoporosis, nephropathy in diabetes mellitus, asthma, pelvic inflammatory disease, chronic inflammatory liver disease, chronic inflammatory lung disease, lung fibrosis, liver fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic inflammatory liver disease, chronic inflammatory lung disease, lung fibrosis, liver fibrosis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, burn injury, and other acute and chronic inflammatory diseases of the Central Nervous System, gastrointestinal system, the skin and associated structures, the immune system, the hepato-biliary system, or any site in the body where pathology can occur with an inflammatory component.

62. The method of claim 61, wherein the inflammatory condition is reperfusion injury or ischemia injury.

63. The method of claim 62, wherein the reperfusion or ischemic injury follows a naturally occurring episode.

64. The method of claim 63, wherein the naturally occurring episode is stroke or myocardial infarction.

65. The method of claim 63, wherein the reperfusion or ischemic injury follows a surgical procedure.

66. The use of claim 65, wherein the surgical procedure is selected from the group consisting of angioplasty, stenting procedure, atherectomy, and bypass surgery.

67. The method of claim 62, wherein the reperfusion or ischemic injury occurs in a cardiovascular tissue.

68. The inhibitor of claim 48, wherein the antibody or antigen-binding fragment is an IgG.

69. A pharmaceutical composition comprising the inhibitor of claim 48, and a pharmaceutically acceptable excipient.

70. A pharmaceutical composition comprising the inhibitor of claim 51, and a pharmaceutically acceptable excipient.
Description



2. CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application is a continuation of U.S. application Ser. No. 13/859,054, filed on Apr. 9, 2013, which is a continuation of U.S. application Ser. No. 12/259,767, filed on Oct. 28, 2008, which is a continuation of U.S. application Ser. No. 11/069,834, filed on Mar. 1, 2005, which claims the benefit of prior U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/588,648, filed on Jul. 16, 2004 and U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/549,123, filed on Mar. 1, 2004; the content of each of these applications is specifically incorporated by reference herein.

3. BACKGROUND

[0003] Nucleated cells are highly sensitive to hypoxia and even short periods of ischemia in multi-cellular organisms can have dramatic effects on cellular morphology, gene transcription, and enzymatic processes. Mitochondria, as the major site of oxygen metabolism, are particularly sensitive to changes in oxygen levels and during hypoxia release reactive oxygen species that chemically modify intracellular constituents such as lipids and proteins. Clinically these effects manifest as an inflammatory response in the patient. Despite intensive investigations of cellular responses to hypoxia little is known regarding the initiation of acute inflammation.

[0004] Acute inflammatory responses can result from a wide range of diseases and naturally occurring events such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Common medical procedures can also lead to localized and systemic inflammation. Left untreated inflammation can result in significant tissue loss and may ultimately lead to multi-system failure and death. Interfering with the inflammatory response after injury may be one method to reduce tissue loss.

[0005] Inflammatory diseases and acute inflammatory responses resulting from tissue injury, however, cannot be explained by cellular events alone. Accumulating evidence supports a major role for the serum innate response or complement system in inflammation. Studies to date have looked at tissue injury resulting from ischemia and reperfusion as one type of inflammatory disorder that is complement dependent. For example, in the rat myocardial model of reperfusion injury, pretreatment of the rats with the soluble form of the complement type 1 receptor dramatically reduced injury. Understanding how complement activation contributes to an inflammatory response is an area of active investigation.

[0006] Inflammatory diseases or disorders are potentially life-threatening, costly, and affect a large number of people every year. Thus, effective treatments of inflammatory diseases or disorders are needed.

4. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0007] In one aspect, the invention features isolated natural immunoglobulins (IgMs). In one embodiment, the antibody is produced by ATCC Accession Number PTA-3507. In another embodiment, the antibody has a light chain variable region comprising the amino acid sequence shown as SEQ ID NO: 8. In yet another embodiment, the antibody has a heavy chain variable region comprising the amino acid sequence shown as SEQ ID NO: 2.

[0008] In another aspect, the invention features IgM inhibitors and pharmaceutical preparations thereof. In one embodiment, the IgM inhibitor is a peptide that specifically binds to a natural IgM and thereby blocks binding to the antigen and/or complement activation. In one embodiment, the peptide includes the following consensus sequence: xNNNxNNxNNNN (SEQ ID NO: 14). Certain inhibitory peptides are provided as SEQ ID NOs: 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36, and 38. Inhibitory peptides may be modified, for example to increase in vivo half-life or bioavailability. Inhibitory peptides may also be labeled to facilitate detection.

[0009] In another aspect, the invention features nucleic acids encoding peptides that specifically bind to natural IgM antibodies, as well as vectors and host cells for expressing the peptides. Certain nucleic acids are provided as SEQ ID NOs: 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23, 25, 27, 29, 31, 33, 35 and 37.

[0010] In a further aspect, the invention features methods of treating an inflammatory disease in a subject by administering to the subject a pharmaceutical composition comprising an IgM inhibitor as disclosed herein.

[0011] In yet other aspects, the invention features method of detecting, diagnosing or monitoring inflammatory diseases in a subject using labeled inhibitory antibodies.

[0012] Other features and advantages of the invention will be apparent based on the following Detailed Description and Claims.

5. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0013] FIGS. 1A-1B show an IgM heavy chain sequence of B-1 hybridoma22A5. (FIG. 1A) shows the IgM.sup.CM-22 (or 22A5 IgM) heavy chain nucleic acid sequence (SEQ ID NO: 1) and (FIG. 1B) shows the amino acid sequence corresponding to the heavy chain sequence of SEQ ID NO: 1 (SEQ ID NO: 2). Framework regions (FVWR) and complementarity-determining regions (CDR) are indicated above the nucleotides.

[0014] FIGS. 2A-2B show an IgM light chain sequence of B-1 hybridoma 22A5. (FIG. 2A) shows the IgM.sup.CM-22 (or 22A5 IgM) light chain nucleic acid sequence (SEQ ID NO: 7) and (FIG. 2B) shows the amino acid sequence corresponding to the light chain sequence of SEQ ID NO: 7 (SEQ ID NO: 8). Framework-regions (FVWR) and complementarity-determining regions (CDR) are indicated above the nucleotides.

[0015] FIG. 3 is a bar graph depicting changes in intestinal permeability of inbred mice after intestinal ischemia and reperfusion or no injury (sham). WT represents parent strain for Cr2-/- mice Cr2-/- was reconstituted with pooled IgG or IgM or saline control. Pooled IgM or IgG (0.5 mg) was administered intravenously approximately 1 hour before treatment. Values are means+standard error; n equals the number of mice in experimental groups.

[0016] FIG. 4 demonstrates reconstitution of I/R injury in antibody deficient mice (RAG-1) by pooled IgM from a single B-1 cell hybridoma clone. IgM or saline was injected intravenously 30 minutes before initial laparotomy. At the end of reperfusion, blood is obtained and permeability index is calculated as the ratio of .sup.125I counts of dried intestine versus that of blood. Values represent means.+-.standard error; n equals the numbers of mice used in experimental groups. 1=WT plus normal saline; 2=RAG plus normal saline; 3=RAG plus IgM hybridoma CM-22; 4=WT sham control.

[0017] FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram of the proposed role for complement and complement receptors in positive selection of peritoneal B-1 lymphocytes.

[0018] FIG. 6A is a graph showing the ELISA screening of M-13 phage-display library for IgM.sup.CM-22-specific peptides. Symbols: .quadrature.-P1 clone; X-P2 clone, .smallcircle.-P7 clone; .diamond.-P8 clone. The plate was coated with a solution of IgM.sup.CM-22 before addition of varying concentrations of phage-clones. The results are representative of at least three independent experiments.

[0019] FIG. 6B is a bar graph showing that the synthetic peptide P8 inhibits IgM.sup.CM-22 binding of phage clone P8. ELISA was performed with varying concentrations of the synthetic peptide P8 added to the IgM.sup.CM-22-coated plate prior to the addition of 5.times.10.sup.11 PFU phage. The results are representative of at least three independent experiments.

[0020] FIG. 6C is a bar graph showing specific binding of the PS peptide to IgM.sup.CM-22. The ELISA plates were coated with 50 .mu.g/ml solution of P8 peptide, followed by addition of IgM.sup.CM-22 or IgM.sup.CM-75 at 1 or 10 .mu.g/ml. IgM binding was detected with a biotinylated rat anti-mouse IgM followed by streptavidin-phosphatase and color reaction. The results are representative of at least three independent experiments.

[0021] FIG. 7A is a series of photomicrographs showing that the P8 peptide blocked IgM.sup.CM-22 mediated injury in vivo. Two upper panels (i and ii) are representative sections (stained with Haematoxylin and Eosin) prepared following RI treatment in RAG-1.sup.-/- mice with IgM.sup.CM-22 alone or mixed with P8 peptide, respectively. Two lower panels (iii and iv) are representative sections prepared from wild type mice treated for intestinal reperfusion injury, which received either saline or peptide P8 5 minutes prior to reperfusion. Arrows indicate pathologic features of injury. Magnification 200.times..

[0022] FIG. 7B is a scatter plot indicating the mean pathology score of each group of treated animals. Each symbol represents the score from one animal. Control group is WT mice pretreated with a control peptide (ACGMPYVRIPTA; SEQ ID NO: 61) at a similar dose as the peptide P8. *indicates statistical significance determined by Student t test of the P8-treated versus untreated groups (p<0.05).

[0023] FIG. 8A is an immunoblot showing the immune precipitation of reperfusion injury (RI) specific antigens. Detection of a unique band (arrow) at approximately 250 kDa on a SDS-PAGE (10%). Size markers are indicated on the left. Intestinal lysates were prepared from RAG.sup.-/- mice reconstituted with IgM.sup.CM-22 and either sham control (no ischemia) or subjected to ischemia followed by reperfusion for 0 or 15 min.

[0024] FIG. 8B is a series of graphs showing results of in vitro binding assays of IgM.sup.CM-22 to the isoforms of non-muscle myosin heavy chain-II ELISA plates were coated with monoclonal antibodies for 3 different isoforms of NMHC-II (upper left: isoform A, upper right: isoform B, lower left: isoform C and lower right: anti-pan myosin antibody). Bound myosin heavy chain from intestinal lysates was detected by IgM.sup.CM-22 or IgM.sup.CM-31. The results represent mean.+-.standard error of OD 405 nm units and are representative of triplicate samples.

[0025] FIG. 8C is a photomicrograph and a scatter plot showing the restoration of RI injury by anti-pan myosin antibody in RAG.sup.-/- mice. RAG-1.sup.-/- mice were reconstituted with affinity purified anti-pan myosin followed by RI surgery. The left panels represents morphologies of RAG.sup.-/- animals with saline control and with anti-pan myosin treatment. The right panel is the pathology scores of intestinal injury. The scatter plot (right panel) represents the pathology scores where each symbol represents a single animal.

[0026] FIG. 9A is a graph showing the surface plasmon resonance for the self-peptide N2. Binding isotherms for samples of the self-peptide N2 with concentration from 10.5 .mu.M to 120 .mu.M injected over the IgM.sup.CM-22-coupled surface.

[0027] FIG. 9B is a graph showing the surface plasmon resonance for a control peptide. Binding isotherm for a same-length, random-sequence control peptide (AGCMPYVRIPTA; SEQ ID NO: 62), injected at a concentration of 117 .mu.M over the IgM.sup.CM-22-coupled surface.

[0028] FIG. 9C is a graph showing the nonlinear curve fitting with a 1:1 Langmuir binding isotherm to the steady-state response levels for the injection showed in FIG. 9A (X.sup.2=10).

[0029] FIG. 9D is a graph showing the binding isotherm for the injection of the self-peptide N2 at 120 .mu.M over a surface coupled with the control IgM.sup.CM-31.

[0030] FIG. 10A is a series of photomicrographs showing that the N2 self-peptide blocking RI in RAG.sup.-/- mice. Two upper panels show representative sections prepared following RI treatment in RAG.sup.-/- mice with IgM.sup.CM-22 alone or mixed with N2 self-peptide. Two lower panels are representative sections prepared from WT mice treated for intestinal RI, which received either saline or N2 peptide 5 minutes prior to reperfusion.

[0031] FIG. 10B is a scatter plot indicating the mean pathology score of each group of treated animals. Each symbol represents a single mouse. * indicates a statistical significance bases on a Student t test.

6. DETAILED DESCRIPTION

6.1 Definitions

[0032] For convenience, certain terms employed in the specification, examples, and appended claims are provided. Unless defined otherwise, all technical and scientific terms used herein have the same meaning as commonly understood by one of ordinary skill in the art to which this invention belongs.

[0033] "A" and "an" are used herein to refer to one or to more than one (i.e., to at least one) of the grammatical object of the article. By way of example, "an element" means one element or more than one element.

[0034] "Amino acid" is used herein to refer to either natural or synthetic amino acids, including glycine and D or L optical isomers, and amino acid analogs and peptidomimetics.

[0035] "Antibody" is used herein to refer to binding molecules including immunoglobulin molecules and immunologically active portions of immunoglobulin molecules, i.e., molecules that contain an antigen-binding site. Immunoglobulin molecules, useful in the invention can be of any class (e.g., IgG, IgE, IgM, IgD, and IgA) or subclass. Native antibodies and immunoglobulins are usually heterotetrameric glycoproteins of about 150,000 daltons, composed of two identical light chains and two identical heavy chains. Each heavy chain has at one end a variable domain followed by a number of constant domains. Each light chain has a variable domain at one end and a constant domain at its other end. Antibodies include, but are not limited to, polyclonal, monoclonal, bispecific, chimeric, partially or fully humanized antibodies, fully human antibodies (i.e., generated in a transgenic mouse expressing human immunoglobulin genes), camel antibodies, and anti-idiotypic antibodies. An antibody, or generally any molecule, "binds specifically" to an antigen (or other molecule) if the antibody binds preferentially to the antigen, and, e.g., has less than about 30%, preferably 20%, 10%, or I % cross-reactivity with another molecule. The terms "antibody" and "immunoglobulin" are used interchangeably.

[0036] "Antibody fragment" or "antibody portion" are used herein to refer to any derivative of an antibody which is less than full-length. In exemplary embodiments, the antibody fragment retains at least a significant portion of the full-length antibody's specific binding ability. Examples of antibody fragments include, but are not limited to, Fab, Fab', F(ab').sub.2, scFv, Fv, dsFv diabody, minibody, Fd fragments, and single chain antibodies. The antibody fragment may be produced by any means. For instance, the antibody fragment may be enzymatically or chemically produced by fragmentation of an intact antibody, it may be recombinantly produced from a gene encoding the partial antibody sequence, or it may be wholly or partially synthetically produced. The antibody fragment may optionally be a single chain antibody fragment. Alternatively, the fragment may comprise multiple chains which are linked together, for instance, by disulfide linkages. The fragment may also optionally be a multimolecular complex. A functional antibody fragment will typically comprise at least about 50 amino acids and more typically will comprise at least about 200 amino acids.

[0037] "Antigen-binding site" is used herein to refer to the variable domain of a heavy chain associated with the variable domain of a light chain.

[0038] "Bind" or "binding" are used herein to refer to detectable relationships or associations (e.g. biochemical interactions) between molecules.

[0039] "Cells," "host cells" or "recombinant host cells" are terms used interchangeably herein. It is understood that such terms refer not only to the particular subject cell but to the progeny or potential progeny of such a cell. Because certain modifications may occur in succeeding generations due to either mutation or environmental influences, such progeny may not, in fact, be identical to the parent cell, but are still included within the scope of the term as used herein.

[0040] "Comprise" and "comprising" are used in the inclusive, open sense, meaning that additional elements may be included.

[0041] "Consensus sequence" is used herein to refer to the sequence formed from the most frequently occurring amino acids (or nucleotides) in a family of related sequences (See. e.g. Winnaker, From Genes to Clones, 1987). In a family of proteins, each position in the consensus sequence is occupied by the amino acid occurring most frequently at that position in the family. If two amino acids occur equally frequently, either can be included in the consensus sequence. A "consensus framework" refers to the framework region in the consensus immunoglobulin sequence.

[0042] A "conservative amino acid substitution" is one in which the amino acid residue is replaced with an amino acid residue having a similar side chain. Families of amino acid residues having similar side chains have been defined in the art. These families include amino acids with basic side chains (e.g., lysine, arginine, histidine), acidic side chains (e.g., aspartic acid, glutamic acid), uncharged polar side chains (e.g., glycine, asparagine, glutamine, serine, threonine, tyrosine, cysteine), nonpolar side chains (e.g., alanine, valine, leucine, isoleucine, proline, phenylalanine, methionine, tryptophan), beta-branched side chains (e.g., threonine, valine, isoleucine) and aromatic side chains (e.g., tyrosine, phenylalanine, tryptophan, histidine). Thus, a predicted nonessential amino acid residue in a natural immunoglobulin can be preferably replaced with another amino acid residue from the same side chain family. Alternatively, in another embodiment, mutations can be introduced randomly along all or part of a natural immunoglobulin coding sequence, such as by saturation mutagenesis, and the resultant mutants can be screened for biological activity.

[0043] "Detectable label" is used herein to refer to a molecule capable of detection, including, but not limited to, radioactive isotopes, fluorophores, chemiluminescent moieties, enzymes, enzyme substrates, enzyme cofactors, enzyme inhibitors, dyes, metal ions, ligands (e.g., biotin or haptens) and the like. "Fluorophore" refers to a substance or a portion thereof which is capable of exhibiting fluorescence in the detectable range. Particular examples of labels which may be used under the invention include fluorescein, rhodamine, dansyl, umbelliferone, Texas red, luminol, NADPH, beta-galactosidase, and horseradish peroxidase.

[0044] "Inhibitor" or "IgM inhibitor" or "antagonist" as used herein refers to an agent that reduces or blocks (completely or partially) an interaction between a natural antibody and another molecule involved in an inflammatory cascade. An inhibitor may antagonize one or more of the following activities of a natural IgM: (i) inhibit or reduce an interaction (e.g., binding) between the IgM and an ischemia-specific antigen; (ii) inhibit or reduce an interaction (e.g., binding) between the natural IgM and a component of the complement pathway, e.g., C1q; (iii) neutralize the natural IgM by, e.g., sequestering the immunoglobulin and/or targeting its degradation; or (iv) inhibit or reduce production of the natural IgM e.g., blocks synthesis, assembly, and/or posttranslational modifications of the IgM. The inhibitor can be a protein or a peptide, an antibody or fragment thereof (e.g., an anti-idiotypic antibody), a modified antibody, a carbohydrate, a glycoprotein, or a small organic molecule.

[0045] "Interaction" refers to a physical association between two or more molecules, e.g. binding. The interaction may be direct or indirect.

[0046] "Inflammatory disease" is used herein to refer to a disease or disorder that is caused or contributed to by a complicated set of functional and cellular adjustments involving acute or chronic changes in microcirculation, movement of fluids, and influx and activation of inflammatory cells (e.g., leukocytes) and complement, and included autoimmune diseases. Examples of such diseases and conditions include, but are not limited to: reperfusion injury, ischemia injury, stroke, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease, hyper-IgM immunodeficiency, arteriosclerosis, coronary artery disease, sepsis, myocarditis, encephalitis, transplant rejection, hepatitis, thyroiditis (e.g. Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Graves disease), osteoporosis, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, Type I diabetes, gout, dermatitis, alopecia areata, systemic lupus erythematosus, lichen sclerosis, ulcerative colitis, diabetic retinopathy, pelvic inflammatory disease, periodontal disease, arthritis, juvenile chronic arthritis (e.g. chronic iridocyclitis), psoriasis, osteoporosis, nephropathy in diabetes mellitus, asthma, pelvic inflammatory disease, chronic inflammatory liver disease, chronic inflammatory lung disease, lung fibrosis, liver fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic inflammatory liver disease, chronic inflammatory lung disease, lung fibrosis, liver fibrosis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, burns, and other acute and chronic inflammatory diseases of the Central Nervous System (CNS; e.g. multiple sclerosis), gastrointestinal system, the skin and associated structures, the immune system, the hepato-biliary system, or any site in the body where pathology can occur with an inflammatory component.

[0047] An "isolated" molecule, e.g., an isolated IgM, refers to a condition of being separate or purified from other molecules present in the natural environment.

[0048] "Natural IgM" is used herein to refer to an IgM antibody that is naturally produced in a mammal (e.g., a human). They have a pentameric ring structure wherein the individual monomers resemble IgGs thereby having two light (.kappa. or .lamda.) chains and two heavy (.mu.) chains. Further, the heavy chains contain an additional C.sub.H4 domain. The monomers form a pentamer by disulfide bonds between adjacent heavy chains. The pentameric ring is closed by the disulfide bonding between a J chain and two heavy chains. Because of its high number of antigen binding sites, a natural IgM antibody is an effective agglutinator of antigen. Production of natural IgM antibodies in a subject are important in the initial activation of B-cells, macrophages, and the complement system. IgM is the first immunoglobulin synthesized in an antibody response.

[0049] "Nucleic acid" is used herein to refer to polynucleotides such as deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), and, where appropriate, ribonucleic acid (RNA). The term should also be understood to include, as equivalents, analogs of either RNA or DNA made from nucleotide analogs, and, as applicable to the embodiment being described, single (sense or antisense) and double-stranded polynucleotides.

[0050] "Operatively linked" is used herein to refer to a juxtaposition wherein the components so described are in a relationship permitting them to function in their intended manner. For example, a coding sequence is "operably linked" to another coding sequence when RNA polymerase will transcribe the two coding sequences into a single mRNA, which is then translated into a single polypeptide having amino acids derived from both coding sequences. The coding sequences need not be contiguous to one another so long as the expressed sequences ultimately process to produce the desired protein. An expression control sequence operatively linked to a coding sequence is ligated such that expression of the coding sequence is achieved under conditions compatible with the expression control sequences. As used herein, the term "expression control sequences" refers to nucleic acid sequences that regulate the expression of a nucleic acid sequence to which it is operatively linked. Expression control sequences are operatively linked to a nucleic acid sequence when the expression control sequences control and regulate the transcription and, as appropriate, translation of the nucleic acid sequence. Thus, expression control sequences can include appropriate promoters, enhancers, transcription terminators, a start codon (i.e., ATG) in front of a protein-encoding gene, splicing signals for introns, maintenance of the correct reading frame of that gene to permit proper translation of the mRNA, and stop codons. The term "control sequences" is intended to include, at a minimum, components whose presence can influence expression, and can also include additional components whose presence is advantageous, for example, leader sequences and fusion partner sequences. Expression control sequences can include a promoter.

[0051] "Patient", "subject" or "host" are used herein to refer to either a human or a non-human mammal.

[0052] "Peptide" is used herein to refer to a polymer of amino acids of relatively short length (e.g. less than 50 amino acids). The polymer may be linear or branched, it may comprise modified amino acids, and it may be interrupted by non-amino acids. The term also encompasses an amino acid polymer that has been modified; for example, disulfide bond formation, glycosylation, lipidation, acetylation, phosphorylation, or any other manipulation, such as conjugation with a labeling component.

[0053] "Promoter" is used herein to refer to a minimal sequence sufficient to direct transcription. Also included in the invention are those promoter elements which are sufficient to render promoter-dependent gene expression controllable for cell-type specific, tissue-specific, or inducible by external signals or agents; such elements may be located in the 5' or 3' regions of the of a polynucleotide sequence. Both constitutive and inducible promoters, are included in the invention (see e.g., Bitter et al., Methods in Enzymology 153:516-544, 1987). For example, when cloning in bacterial systems, inducible promoters such as pL of bacteriophage, plac, ptrp, ptac (ptrp-lac hybrid promoter) and the like may be used. When cloning in mammalian cell systems, promoters derived from the genome of mammalian cells (e.g., metallothionein promoter) or from mammalian viruses (e.g., the retrovirus long terminal repeat; the adenovirus late promoter; the vaccinia virus 7.5K promoter) may be used. Promoters produced by recombinant DNA or synthetic techniques may also be used to provide for transcription of the nucleic acid sequences of the invention. Tissue-specific regulatory elements may be used. Including, for example, regulatory elements from genes or viruses that are differentially expressed in different tissues.

[0054] "Specifically binds" is used herein to refer to the interaction between two molecules to form a complex that is relatively stable under physiologic conditions. The term is used herein in reference to various molecules, including, for example, the interaction of an antibody and an antigen (e.g. a peptide). Specific binding can be characterized by a dissociation constant of at least about 1.times.10.sup.-6 M, generally at least about 1.times.10.sup.-7 M, usually at least about 1.times.10.sup.-8 M, and particularly at least about 1.times.10.sup.-9 M or 1.times.10.sup.-10 M or greater. Methods for determining whether two molecules specifically bind are well known and include, for example, equilibrium dialysis, surface plasmon resonance, and the like.

[0055] "Stringency hybridization" or "hybridizes under low stringency, medium stringency, high stringency, or very high stringency conditions" is used herein to describe conditions for hybridization and washing. Guidance for performing hybridization reactions can be found in Current Protocols in Molecular Biology, John Wiley & Sons, N.Y. (1989), 6.3.1-6:3.6, which is incorporated by reference. Aqueous and non-aqueous methods are described in that reference and either can be used. Specific hybridization conditions referred to herein are as follows: 1) low stringency hybridization conditions in 6.times. sodium chloride/sodium citrate (SSC) at about 45.degree. C., followed by two washes in 0.2.times.SSC, 0.1% SDS at least at 50.degree. C. (the temperature of the washes can be increased to 55.degree. C. for low stringency conditions); 2) medium stringency hybridization conditions in 6.times.SSC at about 45.degree. C., followed by one or more washes in 0.2.times.SSC, 0.1% SDS at 60.degree. C.; 3) high stringency hybridization conditions in 6.times.SSC at about 45.degree. C., followed by one or more washes in 0.2.times.SSC, 0.1% SDS at 65.degree. C.; and preferably 4) very high stringency hybridization conditions are 0.5M sodium phosphate, 7% SDS at 65.degree. C., followed by one or more washes at 0.2.times.SSC, 1% SDS at 65.degree. C. Very high stringency conditions (4) are the preferred conditions and the ones that should be used unless otherwise specified. Calculations of homology or sequence identity between sequences (the terms are used interchangeably herein) are performed as follows.

[0056] To determine the percent identity of two amino acid sequences, or of two nucleic acid sequences, the sequences are aligned for optimal comparison purposes (e.g., gaps can be introduced in one or both of a first and a second amino acid or nucleic acid sequence for optimal alignment and non-homologous sequences can be disregarded for comparison purposes). In a preferred embodiment, the length of a reference sequence aligned for comparison purposes is at least 30%, preferably at least 40%, more preferably at least 50%, 60%, and even more preferably at least 70%, 80%, 90%, 100% of the length of the reference sequence. The amino acid residues or nucleotides at corresponding amino acid positions or nucleotide positions are then compared. When a position in the first sequence is occupied by the same amino acid residue or nucleotide as the corresponding position in the second sequence, then the molecules are identical at that position.

[0057] The percent identity between the two sequences is a function of the number of identical positions shared by the sequences and the percent homology between two sequences is a function of the number of conserved positions shared by the sequences, taking into account the number of gaps, and the length of each gap, which need to be introduced for optimal alignment of the two sequences. The comparison of sequences and determination of percent identity and/or homology between two sequences can be accomplished using a mathematical algorithm. In a preferred embodiment, the percent identity between two amino acid sequences is determined using the Needleman and Wunsch ((1970) J. Mol. Biol. 48:444-453) algorithm which has been incorporated into the GAP program in the GCG software package (available on the world wide web with the extension gcg.com), using either a Blossum 62 matrix or a PAM250 matrix, and a gap weight o (16, 14, 12, 10, 8, 6, or 4 and a length weight of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6. In yet another preferred embodiment, the percent identity between two nucleotide sequences is determined using the GAP program in the GCG software package (available on the world wide web with the extension gcg.com), using a NWSgapdna CMP matrix and a gap weight of 40, 50, 60, 70; or 80 and a length weight of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6. A particularly preferred set of parameters (and the one that should be used unless otherwise specified) are a Blossum 62 scoring matrix with a gap penalty of 12, a gap extend penalty of 4, and a frame shift gap penalty of 5.

[0058] The percent identity and/or homology between two amino acid or nucleotide sequences can be determined using the algorithm of E. Meyers and W. Miller ((1989) CABIOS, 4:11-17) which has been incorporated into the ALIGN program (version 2.0), using a PAM120 weight residue table, a gap length penalty of 12 and a gap penalty of 4.

[0059] "Treating" is used herein to refer to any treatment of, or prevention of, or inhibition of a disorder or disease in a subject and includes by way of example: (a) preventing the disease or disorder from occurring in a subject that may be predisposed to the disease or disorder, but has not yet been diagnosed as having it; (b) inhibiting the disease or disorder, i.e., arresting its progression; or (c) relieving or ameliorating the disease or disorder, i.e., causing regression. Thus, treating as used herein includes, for example, repair and regeneration of damaged or injured tissue or cells at the site of injury or prophylactic treatments to prevent damage, e.g., before surgery.

[0060] "Vector" as used herein refers to a nucleic acid molecule, which is capable of transporting another nucleic acid to which it has been operatively linked and can include a plasmid, cosmid, or viral vector. One type of preferred vector is an episome, i.e., a nucleic acid capable of extra-chromosomal replication. Preferred vectors are those capable of autonomous replication and/or expression of nucleic acids to which they are linked. Vectors may be capable of directing the expression of genes to which they are operatively linked. A vector may also be capable of integrating into the host DNA. In the present specification, "plasmid" and "vector" are used interchangeably as a plasmid (a circular arrangement of double stranded DNA) is the most commonly used form of a vector. However, the invention is intended to include such other forms of vectors which serve equivalent functions and which become known in the art subsequently hereto. Viral vectors include, e.g., replication defective retroviruses, adenoviruses and adeno-associated viruses.

6.2 Natural IgM Antibodies

[0061] The present invention is based, at least in part, on the identification of natural immunoglobulins (Ig), in particular natural IgMs. Certain IgMs may be obtained from the hybridoma that has been deposited with the American Type Culture Collection and provided Accession Number PTA-3507.

[0062] The nucleotide sequence of the heavy chain variable region of the IgM produced from hybridoma PTA-3507, IgM.sup.CM-22 (also referred to as 22A5 IgM) is shown in FIG. 1A (SEQ ID NO: 1), and the amino acid sequence is shown in FIG. 1B (SEQ ID NO: 2). The CDRI domain of the heavy chain variable region corresponds to amino acids 31 to 35 of SEQ ID NO: 2 (SEQ ID NO: 4), which is encoded by nucleotides 91-105 of SEQ ID NO: 1 (SEQ ID NO: 3), and the CDR2 domain of the heavy chain variable region corresponds to amino acids 50 to 66 of SEQ ID NO: 2 (SEQ ID NO: 6), which is encoded by nucleotides 148-198 of SEQ ID NO: 1 (SEQ ID NO: 5).

[0063] The nucleotide sequence of the light chain variable region of IgM.sup.CM-22 is shown in FIG. 2A (SEQ ID NO: 7), and the amino acid sequence is shown in FIG. 2B (SEQ ID NO: 8). The CDR1 domain of the light chain variable region corresponds to amino acids 23 to 37 of SEQ ID NO: 8 (SEQ ID NO: 10), which is encoded by nucleotides 67-111 of SEQ ID NO: 7 (SEQ ID NO: 9), and the CDR2 domain of the light chain variable region corresponds to amino acids 53 to 59 of SEQ ID NO: 8 (SEQ ID NO: 12), which is encoded by nucleotides 157 to 177 of SEQ ID NO: 7 (SEQ ID NO: 11). Due to the degeneracy of the genetic code, other nucleotide sequences can encode the amino acid sequences listed herein.

[0064] The nucleic acid compositions of the present invention, while often in a native sequence (except for modified restriction sites and the like), from either cDNA, genomic or mixtures may be mutated, in accordance with standard techniques. For coding sequences, these mutations, may affect the amino acid sequence as desired. In particular, nucleotide sequences substantially identical to or derived from native V, D, J, constant, switches and other such sequences described herein are contemplated.

[0065] For example, an isolated nucleic acid can comprise an IgM.sup.CM-22 (or 22A5 IgM) heavy chain variable region nucleotide sequence having a nucleotide sequence as shown in FIG. 1A (SEQ ID NO: 1), or a sequence, which is at least 80%, 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98%, or 99% identical to SEQ ID NO: 1. A nucleic acid molecule may comprise the heavy chain CDR1 nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 3, or a portion thereof. Further, the nucleic acid molecule may comprise the heavy chain CDR2 nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 5, or a portion thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the nucleic acid molecule comprises a heavy chain CDRI nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 3, or portion thereof, and a heavy chain CDR2 nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 5, or portion thereof. The nucleic acid molecules of the present invention may comprise heavy chain sequences, e.g. SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 5, or combinations thereof, or encompass nucleotides having at least 80%, 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98%, and 99% sequence identity to SEQ ID NOs: 1, 3 or 5. Further, the nucleic acid molecules of the present invention may comprise heavy chain sequences, which hybridize under stringent conditions, e.g. low, medium, high or very high stringency conditions, to SEQ ID NOs: 1, 3 or 5.

[0066] In another embodiment, the invention features nucleic acid molecules having at least 80%, 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98%, and 99% sequence identity with a nucleic acid molecule encoding a heavy chain polypeptide, e.g., a heavy chain polypeptide of SEQ ID NOs: 2, 4 or 6. The invention also features nucleic acid molecules which hybridize to nucleic acid sequences encoding a heavy chain variable region of a natural antibody or portion thereof, e.g., a heavy chain variable region of SEQ ID NO: 2, 4 or 6.

[0067] In another embodiment, the isolated nucleic acid encodes a IgM.sup.CM-22 (22A5 IgM) light chain variable region nucleotide sequence having a nucleotide sequence as shown in FIG. 2A (SEQ ID NO: 7), or a sequence at least 80%, 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98%, 99% identical to SEQ ID NO: 7. The nucleic acid molecule may comprise the light chain CDR1 nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 9, or a portion thereof. In another preferred embodiment, the nucleic acid molecule may comprise the light chain CDR2 nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 11, or a portion thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the nucleic acid molecule comprises a light chain CDR1 nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 9, or portion thereof, and a light chain CDR2 nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 11, or portion thereof The nucleic acid molecules of the present invention may comprise light chain sequences, e.g. SEQ ID NOs: 7, 9 or 11, or combinations thereof, or encompass nucleotides having at least 80%, 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98%, and 99% sequence identity to SEQ ID NOs: 7, 9 or 11. Further nucleic acid molecules may comprise light chain sequences, which hybridize under stringent conditions, e.g. low, medium, high or very high stringency conditions, to SEQ ID NOs: 7, 9 or 11.

[0068] Nucleic acid molecules can have at least 80%, 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98% or 99% sequence identity with a nucleic acid molecule encoding a light chain polypeptide, e.g., a light chain polypeptide of SEQ ID NOs: 8, 10, or 12. The invention also features nucleic acid molecules which hybridize to a nucleic acid sequence encoding a light chain variable region of a natural antibody or portion thereof, e.g., a light chain variable region of SEQ ID NOs: 8, 10 or 12.

[0069] In another embodiment, the invention provides an isolated nucleic acid encoding a heavy chain CDR1 domain comprising the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 4, or a fragment or modified form thereof. This nucleic acid can encode only the CDR1 region or can encode an entire antibody heavy chain variable region or a fragment thereof. For example, the nucleic acid can encode a heavy chain variable region having a CDR2 domain comprising the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 6. In yet another embodiment, the invention provides an isolated nucleic acid encoding a heavy chain CDR2 domain comprising the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 6, or a fragment or modified form thereof. This nucleic acid can encode only the CDR2 region or can encode an entire antibody heavy chain variable region or a fragment thereof. For example, the nucleic acid can encode a light chain variable region having a CDR1 domain comprising the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 4.

[0070] In still another embodiment, the invention provides an isolated nucleic acid encoding a light chain CDR1 domain comprising the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 10, or a fragment or modified form thereof. This nucleic acid can encode only the CDR1 region or can encode an entire antibody light chain variable region. For example, the nucleic acid can encode a light chain variable region having a CDR2 domain comprising the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 12. The isolated nucleic acid can also encode a light chain CDR2 domain comprising the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 12, or a fragment or modified form thereof. This nucleic acid can encode only the CDR2 region or can encode an entire antibody light chain variable region. For example, the nucleic acid can encode a light chain variable region having a CDR1 domain comprising the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 10.

[0071] The nucleic acid encoding the heavy or light chain variable region can be of murine or human origin, or can comprise a combination of murine and human amino acid sequences. For example, the nucleic acid can encode a heavy chain variable region comprising the CDR1 of SEQ ID NO: 2 (SEQ ID NO: 4) and/or the CDR2 of SEQ ID NO: 2 (SEQ ID NO: 6), and a human framework sequence. In addition, the nucleic acid can encode a light chain variable region comprising the CDR1 of SEQ ID NO: 8 (SEQ ID NO: 10) and/or the CDR2 of SEQ ID NO: 8 (SEQ ID NO: 12), and a human framework sequence. The invention further encompasses vectors containing the above-described nucleic acids and host cells containing the expression vectors.

[0072] The invention also features polypeptides and fragments of the IgMcM-22 heavy chain variable regions and/or light chain variable regions. In exemplary embodiments, the isolated polypeptides comprise, for example, the amino acid sequences of SEQ ID NOs: 8, 10, or 12, or fragments or combinations thereof; or SEQ ID NO: 2, 4, or 6, or fragments or combinations thereof. The polypeptides of the present invention include polypeptides having at least, but not more than 20, 10, 5, 4, 3, 2, or 1 amino acid that differs from SEQ ID NOs: 8, 10, 12, 2, 4 or 6. Exemplary polypeptides are polypeptides that retain biological activity, e.g., the ability to bind an ischemia-specific antigen, and/or the ability to bind complement. In another embodiment, the polypeptides comprise polypeptides having at least 80%, 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98%, and 99% sequence identity with a light chain variable region, or portion thereof, e.g. a light chain variable region polypeptide of SEQ ID NOs: 8, 10, or 12. In another embodiment, the polypeptides comprise polypeptides having at least 80%, 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98%, and 99% sequence identity with a heavy chain variable region, or portion thereof, e.g. a heavy chain variable region polypeptide of SEQ ID NOs: 2, 4, or 6. In another embodiment, the invention features a polypeptide comprising the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 8 and SEQ ID NO: 2, further comprising an IRES sequence.

6.3 Inhibitors of Natural IgM Antibodies

6.3.1 Peptide Inhibitors of Natural IgM Antibodies

[0073] The invention further features IgM inhibitors. In one embodiment, the IgM inhibitor is a peptide that specifically binds to a natural IgM and thereby blocks binding to the antigen. Such peptides can include, but are not limited to, the asparagine-rich peptides described in Table 1 below.

TABLE-US-00001 TABLE 1 Amino acid sequences of natural IgM antibody-binding peptides SEQ ID NO. SEQUENCE Name 14 xNNNxNNxNNNN Asparagine-rich Consensus 16 YNNNNGNYTYRN P1 18 ANTRNGATNNNM P2 20 CDSSCDSVGNCN P3 22 WNNNGRNACNAN P4 24 HNSTSNGCNDNV P5 26 NSNSRYNSNSNN P6 28 KRNNHNNHNRSN P7 30 NGNNVNGNRNNN P8 32 NVANHNNSNHGN P9 34 SYNNNNHVSNRN P10

[0074] The peptides can also include certain "self-peptides" as described in Table 2 below.

TABLE-US-00002 TABLE 2 Amino acid sequences of self-peptides SEQ ID NO. SEQUENCE Name 36 LMKNMDPLNDNI Self-1 38 LMKNMDPLNDNV Self-2 ("N-2")

[0075] As described in more detail in the Exemplification, self-peptides bind to the natural IgM antibody IgM.sup.CM-22.

[0076] In addition to the peptides described above, the present invention encompasses modified peptides whose activity may be identified and/or assayed using a variety of methods well known to the skilled artisan. For example, binding of the peptide to the IgM may be detected using biological assays, Western blotting, immunoprecipitation, or immonocytochemical techniques, such as those described below. In particular, the biological activity (e.g., the ability to a bind natural IgM antibody) of a modified peptide can be characterized relative to that of PS (SEQ ID NO: 30) or N2 (SEQ ID NO: 38).

[0077] Such modified peptides, when designed to retain at least one activity of the naturally-occurring form of the protein, are considered "functional equivalents" of the peptides described in more detail herein. Such modified peptides may be produced, for instance, by amino acid substitution, deletion, or addition, which substitutions may consist in whole or part by conservative amino acid substitutions.

[0078] For instance, it is reasonable to expect that an isolated conservative amino acid substitution, such as replacement of a leucine with an isoleucine or valine, an aspartate with a glutamate, or a threonine with a serine, will not have a major effect on the biological activity of the resulting molecule. Whether a change in the amino acid sequence of a peptide results in a functional homolog may be readily determined by assessing the ability of the variant peptide to produce a response similar to that of the wild-type peptide (e.g. ability to bind natural IgM antibodies). Peptides in which more than one replacement has taken place may readily be tested in the same manner.

[0079] Mutagenesis of the peptide may give rise to homologs, which have improved in vivo half-lives relative to the corresponding wild-type peptide. For example, the altered peptide may be rendered more stable to proteolytic degradation or other cellular processes which result in destruction or inactivation of the protein.

[0080] The amino acid sequences for a population of peptide homo logs can be aligned, preferably to promote the highest homology possible. Such a population of variants may include, for example, homologs from one or more species, or homologs from the same species but which differ due to mutation. Amino acids which appear at each position of the aligned sequences are selected to create a degenerate set of combinatorial sequences. In certain embodiments, the combinatorial library is produced by way of a degenerate library of genes encoding a library of polypeptides which each include at least a portion of potential peptide sequences. For instance, a mixture of synthetic oligonucleotides may be enzymatically ligated into gene sequences such that the degenerate set of potential nucleotide sequences are expressible as individual polypeptides, or alternatively, as a set of larger fusion proteins (e.g., for phage display).

[0081] There are many ways by which the library of potential homologs may be generated from a degenerate oligonucleotide sequence. Chemical synthesis of a degenerate gene sequence may be carried out in an automatic DNA synthesizer, and the synthetic genes may then be ligated into an appropriate vector for expression. One purpose of a degenerate set of genes is to provide, in one mixture, all of the sequences encoding the desired set of potential peptide sequences. The synthesis of degenerate oligonucleotides is well known in the art (see for example, Narang, S A (1983) Tetrahedron 39:3; Itakura et al., (1981) Recombinant DNA, Proc. 3rd Cleveland Sympos. Macromolecules, ed. AG Walton, Amsterdam: Elsevier pp. 273-289; Itakura et al., (1984) Annu. Rev. Biochem. 53:323; Itakura et al., (1984) Science 198:1056; Ike et al., (1983) Nucleic Acid Res. 11:477). Such techniques have been employed in the directed evolution of other proteins (see, for example, Scott et al., (1990) Science 249:386-390; Roberts et al., (1992) PNAS USA 89:2429-2433; Devlin et al., (1990) Science 249: 404-406; Cwirla et al., (1990) PNAS USA 87: 6378-6382; as well as U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,223,409, 5,198,346, and 5,096,815).

[0082] Alternatively, other forms of mutagenesis may be utilized to generate a combinatorial library. For example, peptide homologs may be generated and isolated from a library by screening using, for example, alanine scanning mutagenesis and the like (Ruf et al., (1994) Biochemistry 33:1565-1572; Wang et al., (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269:3095-3099; Balint et al., (1993) Gene 137:109-118; Grodberg et al., (1993) Eur. J. Biochem. 218:597-601; Nagashima et al., (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268:2888-2892; Lowman et al., (1991) Biochemistry 30:10832-10838; and Cunningham et al., (1989) Science 244:1081-1085), by linker scanning mutagenesis (Gustin et al., (1993) Virology 193:653-660; Brown et al., (1992) Mol. Cell Biol. 12:2644-2652; McKnight et al., (1982) Science 232:316); by saturation mutagenesis (Meyers et al., (1986) Science 232:613); by PCR mutagenesis (Leung et al., (1989) Method Cell Mol. Biol. 1:11-19); or by random mutagenesis (Miller et al., (1992) A Short Course in Bacterial Genetics, CSHL Press, Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.; and Greener et al., (1994) Strategies in Mol. Biol. 7:32-34).

[0083] A wide range of techniques are known in the art for screening gene products of combinatorial libraries made by point mutations and truncations, and for screening cDNA libraries for gene products having a certain property (e.g., the ability to bind a natural IgM antibody). Such techniques will be generally adaptable for rapid screening of the gene libraries generated by the combinatorial mutagenesis of peptide homo logs. The most widely used techniques for screening large gene libraries typically comprises cloning the gene library into replicable expression vectors, transforming appropriate cells with the resulting library of vectors, and expressing the combinatorial genes under conditions in which detection of a desired activity facilitates relatively easy isolation of the vector encoding the gene whose product was detected. Each of the illustrative assays described below are amenable to high through-put analysis as necessary to screen large numbers of degenerate sequences created by combinatorial mutagenesis techniques.

[0084] In an illustrative embodiment of a screening assay, candidate combinatorial gene products are passed over a column containing beads having attached to it the binding protein, such as an IgM or portion thereof. Those candidate combinatorial gene products that are retained on the column may be further characterized for binding to IgMs in a manner that could be useful in blocking natural IgM antibody binding and treating inflammatory diseases.

[0085] In another example, the gene library may be expressed as a fusion protein on the surface of a viral particle. For instance, in the filamentous phage system, foreign peptide sequences may be expressed on the surface of infectious phage, thereby conferring two benefits. First, because these phage may be applied to affinity matrices at very high concentrations, a large number of phage may be screened at one time. Second, because each infectious phage displays the combinatorial gene product on its surface, if a particular phage is recovered from an affinity matrix in low yield, the phage may be amplified by another round of infection. The group of almost identical E. coli filamentous phages Ml3, fd, and fl are most often used in phage display libraries, as either of the phage gIII or gVIII coat proteins may be used to generate fusion proteins without disrupting the ultimate packaging of the viral particle (Ladner et al., PCT publication WO 90/02909; Garrard et al., PCT publication WO 92/09690; Marks et al., (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267:16007-16010; Griffiths et al., (1993) EMBO J. 12:725-734; Clackson et al., (1991) Nature 352:624-628; and Barbas et al., (1992) PNAS USA 89:4457-4461). Other phage coat proteins may be used as appropriate.

[0086] The invention also provides for mimetics (e.g., non-peptide agents) which are able to mimic binding of the authentic peptide to a natural IgM antibody. For example, the critical residues of a peptide which are involved in molecular recognition of a natural IgM antibody may be determined and used to generate peptidomimetics that bind to a natural IgM antibody. The peptidomimetic may then be used as an inhibitor of the wild-type protein by binding to the natural IgM antibodies and covering up the critical residues needed for interaction with the wildtype protein, thereby preventing interaction of the protein and the natural IgM antibody. Peptidomimetic compounds may be generated which mimic those residues in binding to the natural IgM antibody. For instance, non-hydrolyzable peptide analogs of such residues may be generated using benzodiazepine (e.g., see Freidinger et al., in Peptides: Chemistry and Biology, G. R. Marshall ed., ESCOM Publisher: Leiden, Netherlands, 1988), azepine (e.g., see Huffman et al., in Peptides: Chemistry and Biology, G. R. Marshall ed., ESCOM Publisher: Leiden, Netherlands, 1988), substituted gamma lactam rings (Garvey et al., in Peptides: Chemistry and Biology, G. R. Marshall ed., ESCOM Publisher: Leiden, Netherlands, 1988), keto-methylene pseudopeptides (Ewenson et al., (1986) J. Med. Chem. 29:295; and Ewenson et al., in Peptides: Structure and Function (Proceedings of the 9th American Peptide Symposium) Pierce Chemical Co. Rockland, I L, 1985), .beta.-turn dipeptide cores (Nagai et al., (1985) Tetrahedron Lett 26:647; and Sato et al., (1986) J Chem Soc Perkin Trans 1:1231), and .beta.-aminoalcohols (Gordon et al., (1985) Biochem Biophys Res Commun 126:419; and Dann et al., (1986) Biochem Biophys Res Commun 134:71).

6.3.2 Nucleic Acids Encoding Peptide Inhibitors

[0087] The invention also features nucleic acids, which encode the peptides discussed above. Exemplary nucleic acids are provided in Table 3.

TABLE-US-00003 TABLE 3 Nucleic acids encoding natural IgM antibody-binding peptides SEQ ID NO: SEQUENCE Name 13 NNN AAY AAY AAY NNN AAY Aparagine- AAY NNN AAY AAY AAY AAY rich Consensus 15 TAY AAY AAY AAY AAY GGN P1 AAY TAY ACN TAY MGN AAY 17 GCN AAY ACN MGN AAY GGN P2 GCN ACN AAY AAY AAY ATG 19 TGY GAY WSN WSN TGY GAY P3 WSN GTN GGN AAY TGY AAY 21 TGG AAY AAY AAY GGN MGN P4 AAY GCN TGY AAY GCN AAY 23 CAY AAY WSN ACN WSN AAY P5 GCN TGY AAY GAY AAY GTN 25 AAY WSN AAY WSN MGN TAN P6 AAN WSN AAY WSN AAY AAY 27 AAR MGN AAY AAY CAY AAY P7 AAY CAY AAY MGN WSN AAY 29 AAY GGN AAY AAY GTN AAY P8 GGN AAY MGN AAY AAY AAY 31 AAY GTN GCN AAY CAY AAY P9 AAY WSN AAY CAY GGN AAY 33 WSN TAY AAY AAY AAY AAY P10 CAY GTN WSN AAY MGN AAY 35 YTN ATG AAR AAY ATG GAY Self-1 CCN YTN AAY GAY AAY ATH 37 YTN ATG AAR AAY ATG GAY Se1f-2 CCN YTN AAY GAY AAY GTN

[0088] The isolated nucleic acids in Table 3 reflect degeneracy in the genetic code. In particular, an "R" corresponds to a base that may be a A or G; a "S" corresponds to a base that may be a G or C; a "V" corresponds to a base that may be an A, C or G; a "Y" corresponds to a base that may be a C or T; a "W" corresponds to a base that may be an A or T; a "D" corresponds to a base that may be an A, G or T; a "N" corresponds to a base that may be an A or C; a "H" corresponds to a base that may be an A, C or T; a "N" corresponds to a base that may be an A, C, G or T; a "K" corresponds to a base that may be a G or T and a "B" corresponds to a base that maybe a C, G or T.

[0089] It is expected that DNA sequence polymorphisms that lead to changes in the amino acid sequences of the subject proteins will exist among mammalian cells. One skilled in the art will appreciate that these variations in one or more nucleotides (from less than 1% up to about 3 or 5% or possibly more of the nucleotides) of the nucleic acids encoding a particular peptide of the invention may exist among individuals of a given species due to natural allelic variation. Any and all such nucleotide variations and resulting amino acid polymorphisms are within the scope of this invention. Preferred nucleic acids encode a peptide, which is at least about 60%, 70%, 80%, 85%, 90%, 95%, 98%, 99% homologous or more with an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36, 38 or another peptide of the invention. Nucleic acids which encode peptides having an activity of a peptide of the invention and having at least about 60%, 70%, 80%, 85%, 90%, 95%, 98%, 99% homology or more with SEQ ID NO: 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36, 38, or another peptide of the invention are also within the scope of the invention.

[0090] Bias in codon choice within genes in a single species appears related to the level of expression of the protein encoded by that gene. Accordingly, the invention encompasses nucleic acid sequences which have been optimized for improved expression in a host cell by altering the frequency of codon usage in the nucleic acid sequence to approach the frequency of preferred codon usage of the host cell. Due to codon degeneracy, it is possible to optimize the nucleotide sequence without effecting the amino acid sequence of an encoded polypeptide. Accordingly, the instant invention relates to any nucleotide sequence that encodes the peptides set forth in SEQ ID NO: 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36, 38 or other peptides of the invention.

[0091] Nucleic acids within the scope of the invention may also contain linker sequences, modified restriction endonuclease sites and other sequences useful for molecular cloning, expression or purification of such recombinant polypeptides.

[0092] A nucleic acid encoding a peptide of the invention may be obtained from mRNA or genomic DNA from any organism in accordance with protocols described herein, as well as those generally known to those skilled in the art. A cDNA encoding a peptide of the invention, for example, may be obtained by isolating total mRNA from an organism, e.g. a bacteria, virus, mammal, etc. Double stranded cDNAs may then be prepared from the total mRNA, and subsequently inserted into a suitable plasmid or bacteriophage vector using any one of a number of known techniques. A gene encoding a peptide of the invention may also be cloned using established polymerase chain reaction techniques in accordance with the nucleotide sequence information provided by the invention.

[0093] In another aspect of the invention, the subject nucleic acid is provided in an expression vector comprising a nucleotide sequence encoding a peptide of the invention and operably linked to at least one regulatory sequence. It should be understood that the design of the expression vector may depend on such factors as the choice of the host cell to be transformed and/or the type of protein desired to be expressed. Moreover, the vector's copy number, the ability to control that copy number and the expression of any other protein encoded by the vector, such as antibiotic markers, should also be considered.

[0094] As will be apparent, the subject gene constructs may be used to cause expression of a peptide of the invention in cells propagated in culture, e.g., to produce proteins or polypeptides, including fusion proteins or polypeptides, for purification.

[0095] This invention also pertains to a host cell transfected with a recombinant gene in order to express a peptide of the invention. The host cell may be any prokaryotic or eukaryotic cell. For example, a polypeptide of the present invention may be expressed in bacterial cells, such as E. coli, insect cells (baculovirus), yeast, or mammalian cells. Other suitable host cells are known to those skilled in the art. Additionally, the host cell may be supplemented with tRNA molecules not typically found in the host so as to optimize expression of the peptide. Other methods suitable for maximizing expression of the peptide will be known to those in the art.

6.3.3 Methods of Producing Peptide Inhibitors

[0096] Peptide inhibitors may be synthesized, for example, chemically, ribosomally in a cell free system, or ribosomally within a cell. Chemical synthesis of peptides of the invention may be carried out using a variety of art recognized methods, including stepwise solid phase synthesis, semi-synthesis through the conformationally-assisted re-ligation of peptide fragments, enzymatic ligation of cloned or synthetic peptide segments, and chemical ligation. Merrifield et al. in J. Am. Chem. Soc., Volume 85, page 2149 (1964), by Houghten et al. in Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, Volume 82, page 5132 (1985), and by Stewart and Young in Solid Phase Peptide Synthesis, Pierce Chem. Co, Rockford, Ill. (1984). Native chemical ligation employs a chemoselective reaction of two unprotected peptide segments to produce a transient thioester-linked intermediate. The transient thioester-linked intermediate then spontaneously undergoes a rearrangement to provide the full length ligation product having a native peptide bond at the ligation site. Full length ligation products are chemically identical to proteins produced by cell free synthesis. Full length ligation products may be refolded and/or oxidized, as allowed, to form native disulfide-containing protein molecules. (see e.g., U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,184,344 and 6,174,530; and T. W. Muir et al., Curr. Opin. Biotech. (1993): vol. 4, p 420; M. Miller, et al., Science (1989): vol. 246, p 1149; A. Wlodawer, et al., Science (1989): vol. 245, p 616; L. H. Huang, et al., Biochemistry (1991): vol. 30, p 7402; M. Schnolzer, et al., Int. J. Pept. Prot. Res. (1992): vol. 40, p 180-193; K. Rajarathnam, et al., Science (1994): vol. 264, p 90; R. E. Offord, "Chemical Approaches to Protein Engineering", in Protein Design and the Development of New therapeutics and Vaccines, J. B. Hook, G. Poste, Eds., (Plenum Press, New York, 1990) pp. 253-282; C. J. A. Wallace, et al., J. Biol. Chem. (1992): vol. 267, p 3852; L. Abrahmsen, et al., Biochemistry (1991): vol. 30, p 4151; T. K. Chang, et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA (1994) 91: 12544-12548; M. Schnlzer, et al., Science (1992): vol., 3256, p 221; and K. Akaji, et al., Chem. Pharm. Bull. (Tokyo) (1985) 33: 184).

[0097] In another variation, peptide production may be achieved using in vitro translation systems. An in vitro translation systems is, generally, a translation system which is a cell-free extract containing at least the minimum elements necessary for translation of an RNA molecule into a protein. An in vitro translation system typically comprises at least ribosomes, tRNAs, initiator methionyl-tRNAMet, proteins or complexes involved in translation, e.g., eIF2, eIF3, the cap-binding (CB) complex, comprising the cap-binding protein (CBP) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F). A variety of in vitro translation systems are well known in the art and include commercially available kits. Examples of in vitro translation systems include eukaryotic lysates, such as rabbit reticulocyte lysates, rabbit oocyte lysates, human cell lysates, insect cell lysates and wheat germ extracts. Lysates are commercially available from manufacturers such as Promega Corp., Madison, Wis.; Stratagene, La Jolla, Calif.; Amersham, Arlington Heights, Ill.; and GIBCO/BRL, Grand Island, N.Y. In vitro translation systems typically comprise macromolecules, such as enzymes, translation, initiation and elongation factors, chemical reagents, and ribosomes. In addition, an in vitro transcription system may be used. Such systems typically comprise at least an RNA polymerase holoenzyme, ribonucleotides and any necessary transcription initiation, elongation d termination factors. In vitro transcription and translation may be carried out within in the same reaction to produce peptides from one or more isolated DNAs.

[0098] Nucleic acids encoding peptide inhibitors may be expressed in vitro by DNA transfer into a suitable host cell. Expression of peptides may be facilitated by inserting the nucleic acids encoding the peptides into a vector, such as a plasmid, virus or other vehicle known in the art that has been manipulated by insertion or incorporation of the natural antibody-binding peptide genetic sequences. Such vectors contain a promoter sequence which facilitates the efficient transcription of the inserted genetic sequence of the host. The vector typically contains an origin of replication, a promoter, as well as specific genes which allow phenotypic selection of the transformed cells. Vectors suitable for use in the present invention include, but are not limited to the T7-based expression vector for expression in bacteria (Rosenberg, et al., Gene, 56: 125, 1987), the pMSXND expression vector for expression in mammalian cells (Lee and Nathans, J. Biol. Chem., 263:3521, 1988) and baculovirus-derived vectors for expression in insect cells. The DNA segment can be present in the vector operably linked to regulatory elements, for example, a promoter (e.g., T7, metallothionein I, or polyhedrin promoters).

[0099] Nucleic acids encoding peptide inhibitors may be expressed in either prokaryotes or eukaryotes. Hosts can include microbial, yeast, insect, and mammalian organisms. Methods of expressing DNA sequences having eukaryotic or viral sequences in prokaryotes are well known in the art. Biologically functional viral and plasmid DNA vectors capable of expression and replication in a host are known in the art. Such vectors can incorporate DNA sequences of the invention. Methods which are well known to those skilled in the art can be used to construct vectors containing the natural antibody-binding peptide coding sequence and appropriate transcriptional/translational control signals. These methods include in vitro recombinant DNA techniques, synthetic techniques, and in vivo recombination/genetic techniques. (See, for example, the techniques described in Maniatis et al., 1989 Molecular Cloning A Laboratory Manual, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, N.Y.)

[0100] A variety of host-expression vector systems may be utilized. These include but are not limited to microorganisms such as bacteria transformed with recombinant bacteriophage DNA, plasmid DNA, or cosmid DNA expression vectors; yeast transformed with recombinant yeast expression vectors; plant cell systems infected with recombinant virus expression vectors (e.g., cauliflower mosaic virus, CaMV; tobacco mosaic virus, TMV) or transformed with recombinant plasmid expression vectors (e.g., Ti plasmid); insect cell systems infected with recombinant virus expression vectors (e.g., baculovirus); or animal cell systems infected with recombinant virus expression vectors (e.g., retroviruses, adenovirus, vaccinia virus), or transformed animal cell systems engineered for stable expression.

[0101] Depending on the host/vector system utilized, any of a number of suitable transcription and translation elements, including constitutive and inducible promoters, transcription enhancer elements, transcription terminators, etc. may be used in the expression vector (see e.g., Bitter et al., 1987, Methods in Enzymology 153:516-544). For example, when cloning in bacterial systems, inducible promoters such as pL of bacteriophage .gamma., plac, ptrp, ptac (ptrp-lac hybrid promoter) and the like may be used. When cloning in mammalian cell systems, promoters derived from the genome of mammalian cells (e.g., metallothionein promoter) or from mammalian viruses (e.g., the retrovirus long terminal repeat; the adenovirus late promoter; the vaccinia virus 7.5K promoter) may be used. Promoters produced by recombinant DNA or synthetic techniques may also be used.

[0102] In yeast, a number of vectors containing constitutive or inducible promoters may be used. For a review see, Current Protocols in Molecular Biology, Vol. 2, 1988, Ed. Ausubel et al., Greene Publish. Assoc. & Wiley Interscience, Ch. 13; Grant et al., 1987, Expression and Secretion Vectors for Yeast, in Methods in Enzymology, Eds. Wu & Grossman, 31987, Acad. Press, N.Y., Vol. 153, pp. 516-544; Glover, 1986, DNA Cloning, Vol. II, IRL Press, Wash., D.C., Ch. 3; and Bitter, 1987, Heterologous Gene Expression in Yeast, Methods in Enzymology, Eds. Berger & Kimmel, Acad. Press, N.Y., Vol. 152, pp. 673-684; and The Molecular Biology of the Yeast Saccharomyces, 1982, Eds. Strathem et al., Cold Spring Harbor Press, Vols. I and II. A constitutive yeast promoter such as ADH or LEU2 or an inducible promoter such as GAL may be used (Cloning in Yeast, Ch. 3, R. Rothstein In: DNA Cloning Vol. 11, A Practical Approach, Ed. D M Glover, 1986, IRL Press, Wash., D.C.). Alternatively, vectors may be used which promote integration of foreign DNA sequences into the yeast chromosome.

[0103] Eukaryotic systems, and preferably mammalian expression systems, allow for proper post-translational modifications of expressed mammalian proteins to occur. Eukaryotic cells which possess the cellular machinery for proper processing of the primary transcript, glycosylation, phosphorylation, and advantageously, plasma membrane insertion of the gene product may be used as host cells.

[0104] Mammalian cell systems which utilize recombinant viruses or viral elements to direct expression may be engineered. For example, when using adenovirus expression vectors, a natural antibody-binding peptide coding sequence may be ligated to an adenovirus transcription/-translation control complex, e.g., the late promoter and tripartite leader sequence. Alternatively, the vaccinia virus 7.5K promoter may be used. (e.g., see, Mackett et al., 1982, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 79: 7415-7419; Mackett et al., 1984, J. Virol. 49: 857-864; Panicali et al., 1982, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 79: 4927-4931). Of particular interest are vectors based on bovine papilloma virus which have the ability to replicate as extrachromosomal elements (Sarver, et al., 1981, Mol. Cell. Biol. 1: 486). Shortly after entry of this DNA into mouse cells, the plasmid replicates to about 100 to 200 copies per cell. Transcription of the inserted cDNA does not require integration of the plasmid into the host's chromosome, thereby yielding a high level of expression. These vectors can be used for stable expression by including a selectable marker in the plasmid, such as, for example, the neo gene. Alternatively, the retroviral genome can be modified for use as a vector capable of introducing and directing the expression of a natural antibody-binding peptide gene in host cells (Cone & Mulligan, 1984, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81:6349-6353). High level expression may also be achieved using inducible promoters, including, but not limited to, the metallothionine IIA promoter and heat shock promoters.

[0105] For long-term, high-yield production of recombinant proteins, stable expression is preferred. Rather than using expression vectors which contain viral origins of replication, host cells can be transformed with a cDNA controlled by appropriate expression control elements (e.g., promoter, enhancer, sequences, transcription terminators, polyadenylation sites, etc.) and a selectable marker. The selectable marker in the recombinant plasmid confers resistance to the selection and allows cells to stably integrate the plasmid into their chromosomes and grow to form foci which in turn can be cloned and expanded into cell lines. For example, following the introduction of foreign DNA, engineered cells may be allowed to grow for 1-2 days in an enriched media, and then are switched to a selective media. A number of selection systems may be used, including but not limited to the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (Wigler, et al., 1977, Cell 11: 223), hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (Szybalska & Szybalski, 1962, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 48: 2026), and adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (Lowy, et al., 1980, Cell 22: 817) genes can be employed in tk.sup.-, hgprf.sup.- or aprt.sup.- cells respectively. Also, antimetabolite resistance can be used as the basis of selection for dhfr, which confers resistance to methotrexate (Wigler, et al, 1980, Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 77: 3567; O'Hare, et al., 1981, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78: 1527); gpt, which confers resistance to mycophenolic acid (Mulligan & Berg, 1981, Proc. Natl Acad Sci. USA 78: 2072; neo, which confers resistance to the aminoglycoside G-418 (Colberre-Garapin, et al., 1981, J. Mol. Biol. 150: 1); and hygro, which confers resistance to hygromycin (Santerre, et al., 1984, Gene 30: 147) genes. Additional selectable genes include trpB, which allows cells to utilize indole in place of tryptophan; hisD, which allows cells to utilize histinol in place of histidine (Hartman & Mulligan, 1988, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85: 8047); and ODC (ornithine decarboxylase) which confers resistance to the ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor, 2-(difluoromethyl)-DL-omithine, DFMO (McConlogue L., 1987, In:Current Communications in Molecular Biology, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory ed.).

[0106] For stable recombinant cell lines, suitable cell types include but are not limited to cells of the following types: NIH 3T3 (Murine), C2Cl 2, L6, and P19. C2C12 and L6 myoblasts will differentiate spontaneously in culture and form myotubes depending on the particular growth conditions (Yaffe and Saxel, 1977; Yaffe, 1968) P19 is an embryonic carcinoma cell line. Such cells are described, for example, in the Cell Line Catalog of the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). These cells can be stably transformed by a method known to the skilled artisan. See, for example, Ausubel et al., Introduction of DNA Into Mammalian Cells, in CURRENT PROTOCOLS IN MOLECULAR BIOLOGY, sections 9.5.1-9.5.6 (John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 1995). "Stable" transformation in the context of the invention means that the cells are immortal to the extent of having gone through at least 50 divisions.

[0107] When the host is a eukaryote, such methods of transfection of DNA as calcium phosphate co-precipitates, conventional mechanical procedures such as microinjection, electroporation, insertion of a plasmid encased in liposomes, or virus vectors may be used. Eukaryotic cells can also be co-transformed with DNA sequences encoding natural antibody-binding peptides, and a second foreign DNA molecule encoding a selectable phenotype, such as the herpes simplex thymidine kinase gene. Another method is to use a eukaryotic viral vector, such as simian virus 40 (SV40) or bovine papilloma virus, to transiently infect or transform eukaryotic cells and express the protein. (see for example, Eukaryotic Viral Vectors, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Gluzman ed., 1982).

[0108] To interact with natural antibodies or for isolation and purification, natural antibody-binding proteins may need to be secreted from the host cell. Accordingly a signal sequence may be used to direct the peptide out of the host cell where it is synthesized. Typically, the signal sequence is positioned in the coding region of nucleic acid sequence, or directly at the 5' end of the coding region. Many signal sequences have been identified, and any that are functional in the selected host cell may be used. Accordingly, the signal sequence may be homologous or heterologous to the polypeptide. Additionally, the signal sequence may be chemically synthesized using recombinant DNA techniques well known in the art.

[0109] The amount of peptide produced in the host cell can be evaluated using standard methods known in the art. Such methods include, without limitation, Western blot analysis, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, non-denaturing gel electrophoresis, HPLC separation, immunoprecipitation, and/or activity assays such as DNA binding gel shift assays.

[0110] When natural antibody-binding peptides are secreted from the host cells, the majority of the peptide will likely be found in the cell culture medium. If, however, the peptide is not secreted, it will be present in the cytoplasm (for eukaryotic, Gram-positive bacteria, and insect host cells) or in the periplasm (for Gram-negative bacteria host cells).

[0111] If the natural antibody-binding peptide remains in the intracellular space, the host cells are typically first disrupted mechanically or osmotically to release the cytoplasmic contents into a buffered solution. The peptide is then isolated from this solution. Purification of the peptide from solution can thereafter be accomplished using a variety of techniques. If the peptide has been synthesized such that it contains a tag such as hexahistidine or other small peptides at either its carboxyl or amino terminus, it may be purified in a one-step process by passing the solution through an affinity column where the column matrix has a high affinity for the tag or for the peptide directly (i.e., a monoclonal antibody). For example, polyhistidine binds with great affinity and specificity to nickel, thus an affinity column of nickel (such as the Qiagen nickel columns) can be used for purification. (See, for example, Ausubel et al., eds., Current Protocols in Molecular Biology, John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1994.)

[0112] Where, on the other hand, the peptide has no tag and it is not practical to use an antibody to purify the peptide, other well-known procedures for purification can be used. Such procedures include, without limitation, ion exchange chromatography, molecular sieve chromatography, HPLC, native gel electrophoresis in combination with gel elution, and preparative isoelectric focusing ("Isoprime" machine/technique, Hoefer Scientific). In some cases, two or more of these techniques may be combined to achieve increased purity.

[0113] If it is anticipated that the peptide will be found primarily in the periplasmic space of the bacteria or the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, the contents of the periplasm or cytoplasm, including inclusion bodies (e.g., Gram-negative bacteria) if the processed peptide has formed such complexes, can be extracted from the host cell using any standard technique known to the skilled artisan. For example, the host cells can be lysed to release the contents of the periplasm by the use of a French press, homogenization, and/or sonication. The homogenate can then be centrifuged.

6.3.4 Antibody Inhibitors of Natural IgM Antibodies

[0114] IgM inhibitors may also be antibodies that compete with natural IgMs in binding to antigen. Methods of producing antibodies are well known in the art. For example, a monoclonal antibody against a target (e.g., a pathogenic immunoglobulin or an ischemia specific antigen on a cell) can be produced by a variety of techniques, including conventional monoclonal antibody methodology e.g., the standard somatic cell hybridization technique of Kohler and Milstein, Nature 256: 495 (1975). Although somatic cell hybridization procedures are preferred, in principle, other techniques for producing monoclonal antibody can be employed e.g., viral or oncogenic transformation of B lymphocytes. The preferred animal system for preparing hybridomas is the murine system. Hybridoma production in the mouse is a very well-established procedure. Immunization protocols and techniques for isolation of immunized splenocytes for fusion are known in the art. Fusion partners (e.g., murine myeloma cells) and fusion procedures are also known.

[0115] Human monoclonal antibodies can be generated using transgenic mice carrying the human immunoglobulin genes rather than mouse immunoglobulin genes. Splenocytes from these transgenic mice immunized with the antigen of interest are used to produce hybridomas that secrete human mAbs with specific affinities for epitopes from a human protein (see, e.g., Wood et al. International Application WO 91/00906, Kucherlapati et al. PCT publication WO 91/10741; Lonberg et al. International Application WO 92/03918; Kay et al. International Application 92/03917; Lonberg, N. et al. 1994 Nature 368:856-859; Green, L. L. et al. 1994 Nature Genet. 7:13-21; Morrison, S. L. et al. 1994 Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81:6851-6855; Bruggeman et al. 1993 Year Immuno. 17:33-40; Tuaillon et al. 1993 PNAS 90:3720-3724; Bruggeman et al. 1991 Eur. J. Immunol 21:1323-1326). In one embodiment, hybridomas can be generated from human CD5+, B-1 cells. Alternatively, "humanized" murine hybridomas can be used that recognize cross-reactive "ischemic antigen".

[0116] Monoclonal antibodies can also be generated by other methods known to those skilled in the art of recombinant DNA technology. An alternative method, referred to as the "combinatorial antibody display" method, has been developed to identify and isolate antibody fragments having a particular antigen specificity, and can be utilized to produce monoclonal antibodies (for descriptions of combinatorial antibody display see e.g., Sastry et al. 1989 PNAS 86:5,728; Huse et al. 1989 Science 246:1275; and Orlandi et al. 1989 PNAS 86:3833). After immunizing an animal with an immunogen as described above, the antibody repertoire of the resulting B-cell pool is cloned. Methods are generally known for obtaining the DNA sequence of the variable regions of a diverse population of immunoglobulin molecules by using a mixture of oligomer primers and PCR. For instance, mixed oligonucleotide primers corresponding to the 5' leader (signal peptide) sequences and/or framework 1 (FR1) sequences, as well as primer to a conserved 3' constant region primer can be used for PCR amplification of the heavy and light chain variable regions from a number of murine antibodies (Larrick et al., 1991, Biotechniques 11:152-156). A similar strategy can also been used to amplify human heavy and light chain variable regions from human antibodies (Larrick et al., 1991, Methods: Companion to Methods in Enzymology 2: 106-110).

[0117] In an illustrative embodiment, RNA is isolated from B lymphocytes, for example, peripheral blood cells, bone marrow, or spleen preparations, using standard protocols (e.g., U.S. Pat. No. 4,683,202; Orlandi, et al. PNAS (1989) 86:3833-3837; Sastry et al., PNAS (1989) 86:5728-5732; and Huse et al. (1989) Science 246:1275-1281.) First-strand cDNA is synthesized using primers specific for the constant region of the heavy chain(s) and each of the .kappa. and .lamda. light chains, as well as primers for the signal sequence. Using variable region PCR primers, the variable regions of both heavy and light chains are amplified, each alone or in combination, and ligated into appropriate vectors for further manipulation in generating the display packages. Oligonucleotide primers useful in amplification protocols may be unique or degenerate or incorporate inosine at degenerate positions. Restriction endonuclease recognition sequences may also be incorporated into the primers to allow for the cloning of the amplified fragment into a vector in a predetermined reading frame for expression.

[0118] The V-gene library cloned from the immunization-derived antibody repertoire can be expressed by a population of display packages, preferably derived from filamentous phage; to form an antibody display library. Ideally, the display package comprises a system that allows the sampling of very large variegated antibody display libraries, rapid sorting after each affinity separation round, and easy isolation of the antibody gene from purified display packages. In addition to commercially available kits for generating phage display libraries (e.g., the Pharmacia Recombinant Phage Antibody System, catalog no. 27-9400-01; and the Stratagene SurfZAP.TM. phage display kit, catalog no. 240612), examples of methods and reagents particularly amenable for use in generating a variegated antibody display library can be found in, for example, Ladner et al. U.S. Pat. No. 5,223,409; Kang et al. International Publication No. WO 92/18619; Dower et al. International Publication No. WO 91/17271; Winter et al. International Publication WO 92/20791; Markland et al. International Publication No. WO 92/15679; Breitling et al. International Publication WO 93/01288; McCafferty et al. International Publication No. WO 92/01047; Garrard et al. International Publication No. WO 92/09690; Ladner et al. International Publication No. WO 90/02809; Fuchs et al. (1991) Bio/Technology 9:1370-1372; Hay et al. (1992) Human Antibody Hybridomas 3:81-85; Huse et al. (1989) Science 246: 1275-1281; Griffths et al. (1993) EMBO J 12:725-734; Hawkins et al. (1992) J. Mol. Biol. 226:889-896; Clackson et al. (1991) Nature 352:624-628; Gram et al. (1992) PNAS 89:3576-3580; Garrad et al. (1991) Bio/Technology 9:1373-1377; Hoogenboom et al. (1991) Nuc. Acid Res. 19:4133-4137; and Barbas et al. (1991) PNAS 88:7978-7982.

[0119] In certain embodiments, the V region domains of heavy and light chains can be expressed on the same polypeptide, joined by a flexible linker to form a single-chain Fv fragment, and the scFV gene subsequently cloned into the desired expression vector or phage genome. As generally described in McCafferty et al., Nature (1990) 348:552-554, complete VH and VL domains of an antibody, joined by a flexible (Gly.sub.4-Ser).sub.3 linker can be used to produce a single chain antibody which can render the display package separable based on antigen affinity. Isolated scFV antibodies immunoreactive with the antigen can subsequently be formulated into a pharmaceutical preparation for use in the subject method.

[0120] Once displayed on the surface of a display package (e.g., filamentous phage), the antibody library is screened with the target antigen, or peptide fragment thereof, to identify and isolate packages that express an antibody having specificity for the target antigen. Nucleic acid encoding the selected antibody can be recovered from the display package (e.g., from the phage genome) and subcloned into other expression vectors by standard recombinant DNA techniques.

[0121] Specific antibody molecules with high affinities for a surface protein can be made according to methods known to those in the art, e.g., methods involving screening of libraries (Ladner, R. C., et al., U.S. Pat. No. 5,233,409; Ladner, R. C., et al., U.S. Pat. No. 5,403,484). Further, these libraries can be used in screens to obtain binding determinants that are mimetics of the structural determinants of antibodies.

[0122] In particular, the Fv binding surface of a particular antibody molecule interacts with its target ligand according to principles of protein-protein interactions, hence sequence data for VH and VL (the latter of which may be of the .kappa. or .lamda. chain type) can be used in protein engineering techniques known to those with skill in the art. Details of the protein surface that comprises the binding determinants can be obtained from antibody sequence information, by a modeling procedure using previously determined three-dimensional structures from other antibodies obtained from NMR studies or crystallographic data. See for example Bajorath, J. and S. Sheriff, 1996, Proteins: Struct. Funct. and Genet. 24 (2), 152-157; Webster, D. M. and A. R. Rees, 1995, "Molecular modeling of antibody-combining sites," in S. Paul, Ed., Methods in Molecular Biol. 51, Antibody Engineering Protocols, Humana Press, Totowa, N.J., pp 17-49; and Johnson, G., Wu, T. T. and E. A. Kabat, 1995, "Seqhunt: A program to screen aligned nucleotide and amino acid sequences," in Methods in Molecular Biol. 51, op. cit., pp 1-15.

[0123] In one embodiment, a variegated peptide library is expressed by a population of display packages to form a peptide display library. Ideally, the display package comprises a system that allows the sampling of very large variegated peptide display libraries, rapid sorting after each affinity separation round, and easy isolation of the peptide-encoding gene from purified display packages. Peptide display libraries can be in, e.g., prokaryotic organisms and viruses, which can be amplified quickly, are relatively easy to manipulate, and which allow the creation of large number of clones. Preferred display packages include, for example, vegetative bacterial cells, bacterial spores, and most preferably, bacterial viruses (especially DNA viruses). However, the present invention also contemplates the use of eukaryotic cells, including yeast and their spores, as potential display packages. Phage display libraries are described above.

[0124] Other techniques include affinity chromatography with an appropriate "receptor", e.g., a target antigen, followed by identification of the isolated binding agents or ligands by conventional techniques (e.g., mass spectrometry and NMR). Preferably, the soluble receptor is conjugated to a label (e.g., fluorophores, colorimetric enzymes, radioisotopes, or luminescent compounds) that can be detected to indicate ligand binding. Alternatively, immobilized compounds can be selectively released and allowed to diffuse through a membrane to interact with a receptor.

[0125] Combinatorial libraries of compounds can also be synthesized with "tags" to encode the identity of each member of the library (see, e.g., W. C. Still et al., International Application WO 94/08051). In general, this method features the use of inert but readily detectable tags that are attached to the solid support or to the compounds. When an active compound is detected, identity of the compound is determined by identification of the unique accompanying tag. This tagging method permits the synthesis of large libraries of compounds which can be identified at very low levels among the total set of all compounds in the library.

[0126] An antibody of the present invention can be one in which the variable region, or a portion thereof, e.g., the complementarity determining regions (CDR or CDRs), are generated in a non-human organism, e.g., a rat or mouse. Chimeric, CDR-grafted, and humanized antibodies are within the invention. Antibodies generated in a non-human organism, e.g., a rat or mouse, and then modified, e.g., in the variable framework or constant region, to decrease antigenicity in a human are within the invention. Any modification is within the scope of the invention so long as the antibody has at least one antigen binding portion.

[0127] Chimeric antibodies (e.g. mouse-human monoclonal antibodies) can be produced by recombinant DNA techniques known in the art. For example, a gene encoding the Fc constant region of a murine (or other species) monoclonal antibody molecule is digested with restriction enzymes to remove the region encoding the murine Fc, and the equivalent portion of a gene encoding a human Fc constant region is substituted. (see Robinson et al., International Patent Publication PCT/US86/02269; Akira, et al., European Patent Application 184,187; Taniguchi, M., European Patent Application 171,496; Morrison et al., European Patent.Application 173,494; Neuberger et al., International Application WO 86/01533; Cabilly et al. U.S. Pat. No. 4,816,567; Cabilly et al., European Patent Application 125,023; Better et al. (1988 Science 240:1041-1043); Liu et al. (1987) PNAS 84:3439-3443; Liu et al., 1987, J. Immunol. 139:3521-3526; Sun et al. (1987) PNAS 84:214-218; Nishimura et al., 1987, Canc. Res. 47:999-1005; Wood et al. (1985) Nature 314:446-449; and Shaw et al., 1988, J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 80:1553-1559).

[0128] A chimeric antibody can be further humanized by replacing sequences of the Fv variable region which are not directly involved in antigen binding with equivalent sequences from human Fv variable regions. General methods for generating humanized antibodies are provided by Morrison, S. L., 1985, Science 229:1202-1207 by Oi et al., 1986, BioTechniques 4:214, and by Queen et at. U.S. Pat. No. 5,585,089, U.S. Pat. No. 5,693,761 and U.S. Pat. No. 5,693,762, the contents of all of which are hereby incorporated by reference. Those methods include isolating, manipulating, and expressing the nucleic acid sequences that encode all or part of immunoglobulin Fv variable regions from at least one of a heavy or light chain. Sources of such nucleic acid are well known to those skilled in the art and, for example, may be obtained from 7E3, an anti-GPII.sub.bIII.sub.a antibody producing hybridoma. The recombinant DNA encoding the chimeric antibody, or fragment thereof, can then be cloned into an appropriate expression vector. Suitable humanized antibodies can alternatively be produced by CDR substitution. U.S. Pat. No. 5,225,539; Jones et al. 1986 Nature 321:552-525; Verhoeyan et al. 1988 Science 239: 1534; and Beidler et al. 1988 J Immunol. 141:4053-4060.

[0129] Humanized or CDR-grafted antibodies can be produced by CDR-grafting or CDR substitution, wherein one, two, or all CDRs of an immunoglobulin chain can be replaced. See e.g., U.S. Pat. No. 5,225,539; Jones et al. 1986 Nature 321:552-525; Verhoeyan et al. 1988 Science 239: 1534; Beidler et al. 1988 J. Immunol. 141:4053-4060; Winter U.S. Pat. No. 5,225,539, the contents of all of which are hereby expressly incorporated by reference. Winter describes a CDR-grafting method which may be used to prepare the humanized antibodies of the present invention (UK Patent Application GB 2188638A, filed on Mar. 26, 1987; Winter U.S. Pat. No. 5,225,539), the contents of which is expressly incorporated by reference.

[0130] A humanized or CDR-grafted antibody will have at least one or two but generally all recipient CDRs (of heavy and/or light immunoglobulin chains) replaced with a donor CDR. Preferably, the donor will be a rodent antibody, e.g., a rat or mouse antibody, and the recipient will be a human framework or a human consensus framework. Typically, the immunoglobulin providing the CDRs is called the "donor" and the immunoglobulin providing the framework is called the "acceptor." In one embodiment, the donor immunoglobulin is a non-human (e.g., rodent). The acceptor framework can be a naturally-occurring (e.g., a human) framework or a consensus framework, or a sequence about 85% or higher, preferably 90%, 95%, 99% or higher identical thereto.

[0131] All of the CDRs of a particular antibody may be replaced with at least a portion of a non-human CDR or only some of the CDRs may be replaced with non-human CDRs. It is only necessary to replace the number of CDRs required for binding of the humanized antibody to the Fc receptor.

[0132] Also within the scope of the invention are chimeric and humanized antibodies in which specific amino acids have been substituted, deleted or added. In particular, preferred humanized antibodies have amino acid substitutions in the framework region, such as to improve binding to the antigen. For example, a humanized antibody will have framework residues identical to the donor framework residue or to another amino acid other than the recipient framework residue.

[0133] As another example, in a humanized antibody having mouse CDRs, amino acids located in the human framework region can be replaced with the amino acids located at the corresponding positions in the mouse antibody. Such substitutions are known to improve binding of humanized antibodies to the antigen in some instances.

[0134] Antibody fragments of the invention are obtained using conventional procedures known to those with skill in the art. For example, digestion of an antibody with pepsin yields F(ab')2 fragments and multiple small fragments. Mercaptoethanol reduction of an antibody yields individual heavy and light chains. Digestion of an antibody with papain yields individual Fab fragments and the Fc fragment.

[0135] In another aspect, the invention also features a modified natural immunoglobulin, e.g., which functions as an agonist (mimetic) or as an antagonist. Preferably the modified natural immunoglobulin, e.g., modified pathogenic immunoglobulin, functions as an antagonist of complement activation. Variants of the pathogenic immunoglobulin can be generated by mutagenesis, e.g., discrete point mutation, the insertion or deletion of sequences or the truncation of a pathogenic immunoglobulin. An agonist of the natural immunoglobulin can retain substantially the same, or a subset, of the biological activities of the naturally occurring form of the protein. An antagonist of a natural immunoglobulin can inhibit one or more of the activities of the naturally occurring form of the pathogenic immunoglobulin by, for example, being capable of binding to an ischemic specific antigen, but incapable of activating a complement pathway. Thus, specific biological effects can be elicited by treatment with a variant of limited function.

[0136] In one embodiment, the site within the natural immunoglobulin (e.g., a pathogenic IgM) that binds C1q can be mutated such that it is no longer capable of binding C1q. For example, the CH2 domain of an IgG and the CH4 domain of an IgM, which are known to contain binding sites for C1q, can be mutated (see WO 94/29351). For example, the carboxyl terminal half of the CH2 domain of an IgG (residues 231 to 239, preferably within 234 to 239), which appear to mediate C1q binding and subsequent complement activation, can be mutated. As another example, Wright et al. have demonstrated that a single nucleotide change in the IgM constant region domain renders the antibody defective in initiating complement-dependent cytolysis. The single nucleotide change results in the encoding of a serine residue, rather than the normal proline residue, at amino acid position 436 in the third constant domain (Wright et al. 1988, J. Biol. Chem. 263: 11221). The amino acid substitutions that can be made to antibodies in order to alter complement binding or activity are well known in the art (see for example, Wright et al. 1988, J. Biol. Chem. 263: 11221; Shulman et al. (1986), Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83: 7678-7682; Arya et al., (1994) J. Immunol. 253: 1206-1212; Poon et al., (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270: 8571-8577, the contents of all of which are hereby incorporated by reference). Accordingly, in one embodiment, the antibodies of the present invention have a mutation that alters complement binding or activity. Antibodies in which amino acids have been added, deleted, or substituted are referred to herein as modified antibodies or altered antibodies. As will be appreciated by the skilled artisan, the methods used for causing such changes in nucleotide or amino acid sequence will vary depending upon the desired results.

[0137] Variants of a natural immunoglobulin can be identified by screening combinatorial libraries of mutants, e.g., truncation mutants, of a natural immunoglobulin for agonist or antagonist activity.

[0138] Libraries of fragments e.g., N terminal, C terminal, or internal fragments, of a natural immunoglobulin coding sequence can be used to generate a variegated population of fragments for screening and subsequent selection of variants of this protein. Variants in which a cysteine residue is added or deleted or in which a residue that is glycosylated is added or deleted are particularly preferred.

[0139] Methods for screening gene products of combinatorial libraries made by point mutations or truncation, and for screening cDNA libraries for gene products having a selected property. Recursive ensemble mutagenesis (REM), a technique which enhances the frequency of functional mutants in the libraries, can be used in combination with the screening assays to identify variants (Arkin and Yourvan (1992) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89:7811-7815; Delgrave et al. (1993) Protein Engineering 6(3):327-331).

[0140] Cell based assays can be exploited to analyze a variegated library. For example, a library of expression vectors can be transfected into a cell line, e.g., a cell line, which ordinarily responds to the protein in a substrate-dependent manner. Plasmid DNA can then be recovered from the cells which score for inhibition, or alternatively, potentiation of signaling by the pathogenic immunoglobulin-substrate, and the individual clones further characterized.

[0141] The invention also features a method of making a natural immunoglobulin, e.g., a pathogenic immunoglobulin having a non-wild type activity, e.g., an antagonist, agonist, or super agonist of a naturally occurring pathogenic immunoglobulin. The method includes: altering the sequence of a natural immunoglobulin, e.g., by substitution or deletion of one or more residues of a non-conserved region, a domain or residue disclosed herein, and testing the altered polypeptide for the desired activity.

[0142] Further, the invention features a method of making a fragment or analog of a natural immunoglobulin, e.g., a pathogenic immunoglobulin having an altered biological activity of a naturally occurring pathogenic immunoglobulin. The method includes: altering the sequence, e.g., by substitution or deletion of one or more residues, of a pathogenic immunoglobulin, e.g., altering the sequence of a non-conserved region, or a domain or residue described herein, and testing the altered polypeptide for the desired activity. In an exemplary embodiment, the modified natural immunoglobulin may have a reduced ability to activate complement. For example, one or more of the amino acid residues involved in complement binding and/or activation are mutated.

[0143] In certain embodiment, the modified natural antibody may comprise at least the CDR1 region of SEQ ID NO: 8 (SEQ ID NO: 10), or antigen binding portions thereof, and/or at least the CDR2 region of SEQ ID NO: 8 (SEQ ID NO: 12), or antigen binding portions thereof. In another embodiment, the modified antibody may comprise at least the CDR1 region of SEQ ID NO: 2 (SEQ ID NO: 4), or antigen binding portions thereof, and/or at least the CDR2 region of SEQ ID NO: 2 (SEQ ID NO: 6), or antigen binding portions thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the modified antibody comprises the CDR1 region of SEQ ID NO: 8 (SEQ ID NO: 10) and the CDR2 region of SEQ ID NO: 8 (SEQ ID NO: 12) or antigen binding portion thereof. In another exemplary embodiment, the modified antibody comprises the CDRI region of SEQ ID NO: 2 (SEQ ID NO: 4) and the CDR2 region of SEQ ID NO: 2 (SEQ ID NO: 6) or antigen binding portions thereof. The modified antibody may also comprise the CDRI region of SEQ ID NO: 8 (SEQ ID NO: IO) and the CDR2 region of SEQ ID NO: 8 (SEQ ID NO: 12) and the modified antibody comprises the CDR1 region of SEQ ID NO: 2 (SEQ ID NO: 4) and the CDR2 region of SEQ ID NO: 2 (SEQ ID NO: 6) or antigen binding portions thereof.

[0144] The modified natural antibody can be a human antibody having a binding affinity to the ischemic-specific antigen, similar, e.g., greater than, less than, or equal to, the binding affinity of the antibody produced by the hybridoma deposited with the ATCC, having the accession number PTA-3507. In another embodiment, the natural antibody can be a non-human antibody, e.g., a cow, goat, mouse, rat, sheep, pig, or rabbit. In an exemplary embodiment, the non-human antibody is a murine antibody. The natural antibody may also be a recombinant antibody. In an exemplary embodiment, the natural antibody is a humanized antibody. The modified natural antibody may be an IgG or IgM antibody. In another embodiment, the isolated natural immunoglobulin possess the same antigenic specificity as the immunoglobulin produced by the hybridoma deposited with the ATCC, having accession number PTA-3507.

6.4 Screening Assay to Identify Additional Inhibitors

[0145] Other inhibitors of an interaction between a natural IgM antibody and an antigen or a component of the complement pathway may be identified from one or more (e.g., a plurality of) test compounds, comprising (i) providing a reaction mixture which includes the natural IgM antibody and the antigen or the component of the complement pathway under conditions that allow binding of the natural IgM antibody and the antigen or the component of the complement pathway to occur; (ii) contacting the natural IgM antibody and the antigen or the component of the complement pathway with one or more test compounds (e.g., members of a combinatorial library); and (iii) detecting any changes in binding of the natural IgM antibody and the antigen or the component of the complement in the presence of a given test compound relative to that detected in the absence of the test compound. A change (e.g., decrease) in the level of binding between the natural IgM antibody and the antigen or the component of the complement pathway in the presence of the test compound relative to that detected in the absence of the test compound indicates that the test compound is an inhibitor of the interaction between the natural IgM antibody and the antigen or the component of the complement pathway.

[0146] The method can further include pre-treating the natural IgM antibodies with one or more test compounds. The pre-treated natural IgM antibodies can then be injected into mice deficient in natural immunoglobulins.

[0147] In certain embodiments, the methods is performed in vitro. In an exemplary embodiment, the contacting step is effected in vivo. In an exemplary embodiment, the antigen is myosin. In other embodiments, the antigen is an endothelial tissue or lysate obtained from a subject e.g., a human patient with reperfusion or ischemic injury. In another exemplary embodiment, the component of the complement pathway is a component of the classical pathway of complement. In a further exemplary embodiment, the component of the complement pathway is a C1 molecule or a subunit thereof (e.g., C1q).

[0148] In exemplary embodiments, either the natural IgM antibody or the antigen (or both) is labeled with a detectable signal, e.g., fluorophores, colorimetric enzymes, radioisotopes, luminescent compounds, and the like. The method can further include repeating at least one step, e.g., the contacting step with a second or subsequent member or members of the library.

[0149] In an exemplary embodiment, a plurality of test compounds, e.g., library members, is tested. The plurality of test compounds, e.g., library members, can include at least 10, 10.sup.2, 10.sup.3, 10.sup.4, 10.sup.5, 10.sup.6, 10.sup.7, or 10.sup.8 compounds. In a preferred embodiment, the plurality of test compounds, e.g., library members, share a structural or functional characteristic. The test compound can be a peptide or a small organic molecule.

[0150] In one embodiment, the inhibitor is a small organic molecule that may be identified in a combinatorial library. In one embodiment, the invention provides libraries of inhibitors. The synthesis of combinatorial libraries is well known in the art and has been reviewed (see, e.g. E. M. Gordon et al., J. Med. Chem. (1994) 37:1385-1401; DeWitt, S. H.; Czarnik, A. W. Acc. Chem. Res. (1996) 29:114; Armstrong, R. W.; Combs, A. P.; Tempest, P. A.; Brown, S. D.; Keating, T. A. Acc. Chem. Res. (1996) 29:123; Ellman, J. A. Acc. Chem. Res. (1996) 29:132; Gordon, E. M.; Gallop, M. A.; Patel, D. V. Acc. Chem. Res. (1996) 29:144; Lowe, G. Chem. Soc. Rev. (1995) 309, Blondelle et al., Trends Anal. Chem. (1995) 14:83; Chen et al. J Am. Chem. Soc. (1994) 116:2661; U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,359,115, 5,362,899, and 5,288,514; PCT Publication Nos. WO92/10092, WO93/09668, WO91/07087, WO93/20242, WO94/08051).

[0151] Libraries of compounds of the invention can be prepared according to a variety of methods, some of which are known in the art. For example, a "split-pool" strategy can be implemented in the following way: beads of a functionalized polymeric support are placed in a plurality of reaction vessels; a variety of polymeric supports suitable for solid-phase peptide synthesis are known, and some are commercially available (for examples, see, e.g., M. Bodansky "Principles of Peptide Synthesis", 2nd edition, Springer-Verlag, Berlin (1993)). To each aliquot of beads is added a solution of a different activated amino acid, and the reactions are allowed to proceed to yield a plurality of immobilized amino acids, one in each reaction vessel. The aliquots of derivatized beads are then washed, "pooled" (i.e., recombined), and the pool of beads is again divided, with each aliquot being placed in a separate reaction vessel. Another activated amino acid is then added to each aliquot of beads. The cycle of synthesis is repeated until a desired peptide length is obtained. The amino acid residues added at each synthesis cycle can be randomly selected; alternatively, amino acids can be selected to provide a "biased" library, e.g., a library in which certain portions of the inhibitor are selected non-randomly, e.g., to provide an inhibitor having known structural similarity or homology to a known peptide capable of interacting with an antibody, e.g., the an anti-idiotypic antibody antigen binding site. It will be appreciated that a wide variety of peptidic, peptidomimetic, or non-peptidic compounds can be readily generated in this way.

[0152] The "split-pool" strategy results in a library of peptides, e.g., inhibitors, which can be used to prepare a library of test compounds of the invention. In another illustrative synthesis, a "diversomer library" is created by the method of Hobbs DeWitt et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 90:6909 (1993)). Other synthesis methods, including the "tea-bag" technique of Houghten (see, e.g., Houghten et al., Nature 354:84-86 (1991)) can also be used to synthesize libraries of compounds according to the subject invention. Libraries of compounds can be screened to determine whether any members of the library have a desired activity, and, if so, to identify the active species. Methods of screening combinatorial libraries have been described (see, e.g., Gordon et al., J Med. Chem., supra). Soluble compound libraries can be screened by affinity chromatography with an appropriate receptor to isolate ligands for the receptor, followed by identification of the isolated ligands by conventional techniques (e.g., mass spectrometry, NMR, and the like). Immobilized compounds can be screened by contacting the compounds with a soluble receptor; preferably, the soluble receptor is conjugated to a label (e.g., fluorophores, colorimetric enzymes, radioisotopes, luminescent compounds, and the like) that can be detected to indicate ligand binding. Alternatively, immobilized compounds can be selectively released and allowed to diffuse through a membrane to interact with a receptor. Exemplary assays useful for screening the libraries of the invention are described below.

[0153] In one embodiment, compounds of the invention can be screened for the ability to interact with a natural immunoglobulin by assaying the activity of each compound to bind directly to the immunoglobulin or to inhibit an interaction between the immunoglobulin and an ischemic antigen, e.g., by incubating the test compound with an immunoglobulin and a lysate, e.g., an endothelial cell lysate, e.g., in one well of a multiwell plate, such as a standard 96-well microtiter plate. In this embodiment, the activity of each individual compound can be determined. A well or wells having no test compound can be used as a control. After incubation, the activity of each test compound can be determined by assaying each well. Thus, the activities of a plurality of test compounds can be determined in parallel.

6.5 Modified Inhibitors and Pharmaceutical and Diagnostic Preparations

[0154] IgM inhibitors may be modified, for example to increase solubility and/or facilitate purification, identification, detection, and/or structural characterization. Exemplary modifications, include, for example, addition of: glutathione S-transferase (GST), protein A, protein G, calmodulin-binding peptide, thioredoxin, maltose binding protein, HA, myc, poly-arginine, poly-His, poly-His-Asp or FLAG fusion proteins and tags. In various embodiments, an IgM inhibitors may comprise one or more heterologous fusions. For example, peptides may contain multiple copies of the same fusion domain or may contain fusions to two or more different domains. The fusions may occur at the N-terminus of the peptide, at the C-terminus of the peptide, or at both the N- and C-terminus of the peptide. It is also within the scope of the invention to include linker sequences between a peptide of the invention and the fusion domain in order to facilitate construction of the fusion protein or to optimize protein expression or structural constraints of the fusion protein. In another embodiment, the peptide may be constructed so as to contain protease cleavage sites between the fusion peptide and peptide of the invention in order to remove the tag after protein expression or thereafter. Examples of suitable endoproteases, include, for example, Factor Xa and TEV proteases.

[0155] Techniques for making fusion genes are well known. Essentially, the joining of various DNA fragments coding for different polypeptide sequences is performed in accordance with conventional techniques, employing blunt-ended or stagger-ended termini for ligation, restriction enzyme digestion to provide for appropriate termini, filling-in of cohesive ends as appropriate, alkaline phosphatase treatment to avoid undesirable joining, and enzymatic ligation. In another embodiment, the fusion gene may be synthesized by conventional techniques including automated DNA synthesizers. Alternatively, PCR amplification of gene fragments may be carried out using anchor primers which give rise to complementary overhangs between two consecutive gene fragments, which may subsequently be annealed to generate a chimeric gene sequence (see, for example, Current Protocols in Molecular Biology, eds. Ausubel et al., John Wiley & Sons: 1992).

[0156] IgM inhibitors may be chemically modified based on linkage to a polymer. The polymer is typically water soluble so that the inhibitor to which it is attached does not precipitate in an aqueous environment, such as a physiological environment. The polymer may have a single reactive group, such as an active ester for acylation or an aldehyde for alkylation, so that the degree of polymerization may be controlled. A preferred reactive aldehyde is polyethylene glycol propionaldehyde, which is water stable, or mono C1-C10 alkoxy or aryloxy derivatives thereof (see U.S. Pat. No. 5,252,714). The polymer may be branched or unbranched. Preferably, for therapeutic use of the end-product preparation, the polymer will be pharmaceutically acceptable. The water soluble polymer, or mixture thereof if desired, may be selected from the group consisting of, for example, polyethylene glycol (PEG), monomethoxy-polyethylene glycol, dextran, cellulose, or other carbohydrate based polymers, poly-(N-vinyl pyrrolidone) polyethylene glycol, propylene glycol homopolymers, a polypropylene oxide/ethylene oxide co-polymer, polyoxyethylated polyols (e.g., glycerol) and polyvinyl alcohol.

[0157] IgM inhibitors may be labeled, for example with an isotopic label to facilitate its detection using nuclear magnetic resonance or another applicable technique. Exemplary isotopic labels include radioisotopic labels such as, for example, potassium-40 (.sup.40K), carbon-14 (.sup.14c) tritium (.sup.3H), sulphur-35 (.sup.35S), phosphorus-32 (.sup.32P), technetium-99m (.sup.99mTc), thallium-201 (.sup.201Tl), gallium-67 (.sup.67Ga), indium-111 (.sup.111In), iodine-123 (.sup.1231), iodine-131 (.sup.131I), yttrium-90 (.sup.90Y), samarium-153 (.sup.153Sm), rhenium-186 (.sup.186Re), rhenium-188 (.sup.188Re), dysprosium-165 (.sup.165Dy) and holmium-166 (.sup.166Ho). The isotopic label may also be an atom with non-zero nuclear spin, including, for example, hydrogen-I (.sup.1H), hydrogen-2 (.sup.2H), hydrogen-3 (3H), phosphorous-31 (.sup.31P), sodium-23 (.sup.23Na), nitrogen-14 (.sup.14N), nitrogen-15 (.sup.15N), carbon-13 (.sup.13C) and fluorine-19 (.sup.19F). In certain embodiments, the inhibitor is uniformly labeled with an isotopic label, for example, wherein at least 50%, 70%, 80%, 90%, 95%, or 98% of the inhibitor is labeled. In other embodiments, the isotopic label is located in one or more specific locations within the inhibitor, for example, the label may be specifically incorporated into one or more of the leucine residues of a peptide. A single inhibitor may comprise two or more different isotopic labels, for example, a peptide may comprise both .sup.15N and .sup.13C labeling.

[0158] Inhibitors may be labeled with a fluorescent label. In an exemplary embodiment, an inhibitor is fused to a heterologous polypeptide sequence which produces a detectable fluorescent signal, including, for example, green fluorescent protein (GFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), Renilla reniformis green fluorescent protein, GFPmut2, GFPuv4, enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP), enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), enhanced blue fluorescent protein (EBFP), citrine and red fluorescent protein from discosoma (dsRED).

[0159] Toxicity and therapeutic efficacy of natural antibody inhibitors including natural IgM antibody-binding peptides or modified natural IgM antibodies can be determined by standard pharmaceutical procedures in cell cultures or experimental animals, e.g., for determining the LD.sub.50 (the dose lethal to 50% of the population) and the ED.sub.50 (the dose therapeutically effective in 50% of the population). The dose ratio between toxic and therapeutic effects is the therapeutic index and it can be expressed as the ratio LD.sub.50/ED.sub.50. Natural antibody inhibitors which exhibit large therapeutic effects are preferred. While natural antibody inhibitors or natural antibody binding peptides that exhibit toxic side effects may be used, care should be taken to design a delivery system that targets such peptides or modified antibodies to the site of affected tissue in order to minimize potential damage to uninfected cells and, thereby, reduce side effects.

[0160] The data obtained from the cell culture assays and animal studies can be used in formulating a range of dosage for use in humans. The dosage of a natural antibody inhibitor or a natural antibody-binding peptides lies preferably within a range of circulating concentrations that include the ED.sub.50 with little or no toxicity. The dosage may vary within this range depending upon the dosage form employed and the route of administration utilized. For any inhibitor or peptide used in the method of the invention, the therapeutically effective dose can be estimated initially from cell culture assays. A dose may be formulated in animal models to achieve circulating plasma concentration range that includes the IC.sub.50 (i.e., the concentration of the test compound which achieves a half-maximal inhibition of symptoms) as determined in cell culture. Such information can be used to more accurately determine useful doses in humans. Levels in plasma may be measured, for example, by high performance liquid chromatography.

[0161] In another embodiment, a single bolus of a natural antibody inhibitor including a natural IgM antibody-binding peptide and modified natural IgM antibodies is administered prior to, contemporaneously with, or subsequent to a tissue injury. Typically a single dose injection will be a few hours, a few days or a few weeks after tissue injury. The present invention is based in part upon the discovery that a natural IgM antibody inhibitor prevents reperfusion injury. A single unit dosage delivery can be immediately adjacent to the site of injury or can be, for example, to a vessel that drains or flows to the site of injury.

[0162] A natural IgM antibody inhibitor such as natural IgM antibody-binding peptide or modified natural IgM antibody is administered initially at a point in time prior to the time of damage of the target organ or tissue. This may be a useful approach in subjects who are determined to be at risk for reperfusion injury, such as those with a history of reperfusion injury or those about to undergo surgery.

[0163] In yet another embodiment, a single bolus of a natural IgM antibody inhibitor can be followed by subsequence administrations of a natural IgM antibody inhibitor as continuous infusions or additional single bolus deliveries. The inhibitor may be administer in sequential exposures over a period of hours, days, weeks, months or years. In addition, it is contemplated that additional therapeutic agents can be combined with, administered prior to or subsequent to administration of a natural antibody-binding peptide or another natural antibody inhibitor. Other therapeutic agents that may be administered with a natural IgM antibody inhibitor include, but are not limited to, anti-coagulation agents and complement inhibitors.

[0164] The subject inhibitors may be provided in pharmaceutically acceptable carriers or formulated for a variety of modes of administration, including systemic and topical or localized administration. Techniques and formulations generally may be found in Remington's Pharmaceutical Sciences, Meade Publishing Co., Easton, Pa. In certain embodiments, the inhibitor is provided for transmucosal or transdermal delivery. For such administration, penetrants appropriate to the barrier to be permeated are used in the formulation with the polypeptide. Such penetrants are generally known in the art, and include, for example, for transmucosal administration bile salts and fusidic acid derivatives. In addition, detergents may be used to facilitate permeation. Transmucosal administration may be through nasal sprays or using suppositories. For topical administration, the inhibitors of the invention are formulated into ointments, salves, gels, or creams as generally known in the art.

[0165] The pharmaceutical compositions according to the invention are prepared by bringing a natural IgM antibody inhibitors into a form suitable for administration to a subject using carriers, excipients and additives or auxiliaries. Frequently used carriers or auxiliaries include magnesium carbonate, titanium dioxide, lactose, mannitol and other sugars, talc, milk protein, gelatin, starch, vitamins, cellulose and its derivatives, animal and vegetable oils, polyethylene glycols and solvents, such as sterile water, alcohols, glycerol and polyhydric alcohols. Intravenous vehicles include fluid and nutrient replenishers. Preservatives include antimicrobial, anti-oxidants, chelating agents and inert gases. Other pharmaceutically acceptable carriers include aqueous solutions, non-toxic excipients, including salts, preservatives, buffers and the like, as described, for instance, in Remington's Pharmaceutical Sciences, 15th ed. Easton: Mack Publishing Co., 1405-1412, 1461-1487 (1975) and The National Formulary XIV, 14th ed. Washington: American Pharmaceutical Association (1975), the contents of which are hereby incorporated by reference. The pH and exact concentration of the various components of the pharmaceutical composition are adjusted according to routine skills in the art. See Goodman and Oilman's The Pharmacological Basis for Therapeutics (7th ed.).

[0166] The pharmaceutical compositions are preferably prepared and administered in dose units. Solid dose units are tablets, capsules and suppositories and including, for example, alginate based pH dependent release gel caps. For treatment of a subject, depending on activity of the compound, manner of administration, nature and severity of the disorder, age and body weight of the subject, different daily doses are necessary. Under certain circumstances, however, higher or lower daily doses may be appropriate. The administration of the daily dose can be carried out both by single administration in the form of an individual dose unit or by several smaller dose units and also by multiple administration of subdivided doses at specific intervals.

[0167] The pharmaceutical compositions according to the invention may be administered locally or systemically in a therapeutically effective dose. Amounts effective for this use will, of course, depend on the severity of the disease and the weight and general state of the subject. As discussed above, dosages used in vitro may provide useful guidance in the amounts useful for in situ administration of the pharmaceutical composition, and animal models may be used to determine effective dosages for treatment of particular disorders. Various considerations are described, e.g., in Langer, Science, 249: 1527, (1990); Gilman et al. (eds.) (1990), each of which is herein incorporated by reference.

[0168] In one embodiment, the invention provides a pharmaceutical composition useful for administering a natural antibody-binding peptide to a subject in need of such treatment. "Administering" the pharmaceutical composition of the invention may be accomplished by any means known to the skilled artisan. Preferably a "subject" refers to a mammal, most preferably a human.

[0169] The natural IgM antibody inhibitor can be administered parenterally, enterically, by injection, rapid infusion, nasopharyngeal absorption, dermal absorption, rectally and orally. Pharmaceutically acceptable carrier preparations for parenteral administration include sterile or aqueous or non-aqueous solutions, suspensions, and emulsions. Examples of non-aqueous solvents are propylene glycol, polyethylene glycol, vegetable oils such as olive oil, and injectable organic esters such as ethyl oleate. Carriers for occlusive dressings can be used to increase skin permeability and enhance antigen absorption. Liquid dosage forms for oral administration may generally comprise a liposome solution containing the liquid dosage form. Suitable solid or liquid pharmaceutical preparation forms are, for example, granules, powders, tablets, coated tablets, (micro)capsules, suppositories, syrups, emulsions, suspensions, creams, aerosols, drops or injectable solution in ampule form and also preparations with protracted release of active compounds, in whose preparation excipients and additives and/or auxiliaries such as disintegrants, binders, coating agents, swelling agents, lubricants, flavorings, sweeteners and elixirs containing inert diluents commonly used in the art, such as purified water. Where the disease or disorder is a gastrointestinal disorder oral formulations or suppository formulations are preferred.

[0170] Sterile injectable solutions can be prepared by incorporating a natural antibody-binding peptide in the required amount (e.g., about 10 .mu.g to about 10 mg/kg) in an appropriate solvent and then sterilizing, such as by sterile filtration. Further, powders can be prepared by standard techniques such as freeze drying or vacuum drying.

[0171] In another embodiment, a natural IgM antibody inhibitor is prepared with a biodegradable carrier for sustained release characteristics for either sustained release in the GI tract or for target organ implantation with long term active agent release characteristics to the intended site of activity. Biodegradable polymers include, for example, ethylene vinyl acetate, polyanhydrides, polyglycolic acids, polylactic acids, collagen, polyorthoesters, and poly acetic acid. Liposomal formulation can also be used.

[0172] Another means of delivering natural IgM antibody inhibitor (e.g., a natural IgM antibody-binding peptide) is by delivering host cells that express natural antibody-binding peptides to a site or tissue in need of repair. Alternatively, the cells may be delivered in conjunction with various delivery vehicles, including biocompatible biodegradable or non-biodegradable sponges (e.g., collagen, or other extracellular matrix materials), cotton, polyglycolic acid, cat gut sutures, cellulose, gelatin, dextran, polyamide, a polyester, a polystyrene, a polypropylene, a polyacrylate, a polyvinyl, a polycarbonate, a polytetrafluorethylene, or a nitrocellulose compound formed into a three-dimensional structure (see, for example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,858,721 to Naughton et al., the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference).

[0173] Any route of administration compatible with the active principle can be used. The preferred is parenteral administration, such as subcutaneous, intramuscular or intravenous injection. The dose of the active ingredient to be administered depends on the basis of the medical prescriptions according to age, weight and the individual response of the patient.

[0174] The daily non-weighted dosage for the patient can be between about 2.5-5.0 mg/Kg, e.g., about 2.5-3.0 mg/Kg, about 3.0-3.5 mg/Kg, about 3.5-4.0 mg/Kg, about 4.0-4.5 mg/Kg, and about 4.5-5.0 mg/Kg.

[0175] The pharmaceutical composition for parenteral administration can be prepared in an injectable form comprising the active principle and a suitable vehicle. Vehicles for the parenteral administration are well known in the art and comprise, for example, water, saline solution, Ringer solution and/or dextrose.

[0176] The vehicle can contain small amounts of excipients in order to maintain the stability and isotonicity of the pharmaceutical preparation.

[0177] The preparation of the cited solutions can be carried out according to the ordinary modalities.

[0178] The present invention has been described with reference to the specific embodiments, but the content of the description comprises all modifications and substitutions which can be brought by a person skilled in the art without extending beyond the meaning and purpose of the claims. The compositions may, if desired, be presented in a pack or dispenser device which may contain one or more unit dosage forms containing the active ingredient. The pack may for example comprise metal or plastic foil, such as a blister pack. The pack or dispenser device may be accompanied by instructions for administration.

6.6 Diseases and Conditions that can be Treated with Natural IgM Antibody Inhibitors

[0179] IgM inhibitors, such as natural IgM antibody-binding peptides or modified natural IgM antibodies, may be used for treating a number of inflammatory diseases and conditions that are triggered by binding of natural IgM antibodies. For instance, the inhibitors may be used to treat inflammatory diseases or conditions such as reperfusion injury, ischemia injury, stroke, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease, hyper-IgM immunodeficiency, arteriosclerosis, coronary artery disease, sepsis, myocarditis, encephalitis, transplant rejection, hepatitis, thyroiditis (e.g., Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Graves disease), osteoporosis, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, Type I diabetes, gout, dermatitis, alopecia areata, systemic lupus erythematosus, lichen sclerosis, ulcerative colitis, diabetic retinopathy, pelvic inflammatory disease, periodontal disease, arthritis, juvenile chronic arthritis (e.g., chronic iridocyclitis), psoriasis, osteoporosis, nephropathy in diabetes mellitus, asthma, pelvic inflammatory disease, chronic inflammatory liver disease, chronic inflammatory lung disease, lung fibrosis, liver fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic inflammatory liver disease, chronic inflammatory lung disease, lung fibrosis, liver fibrosis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, burn injury (or thermal injury), and other acute and chronic inflammatory diseases of the Central Nervous System (CNS; e.g., multiple sclerosis), gastrointestinal system, the skin and associated structures, the immune system, the hepato-biliary system, or any site in the body where pathology can occur with an inflammatory component.

[0180] An inflammatory condition such as reperfusion or ischemic injury may result following a naturally occurring episode, e.g., as a stroke or myocardial infarction. Reperfusion or ischemic injury may also occur during and/or following a surgical procedure. Exemplary surgical procedures that cause can cause injury include a vessel-corrective technique selected from the group consisting of angioplasty, stenting procedure, atherectomy, and bypass surgery. In an exemplary embodiment, reperfusion or ischemic injury occurs in a cardiovascular tissue, such as the heart.

[0181] In addition, diseases or conditions that are triggered by binding of natural IgM antibodies may be treated or prevented in a subject by removing from the subject or inactivating a natural or pathogenic IgM and/or B cells producing the pathogenic immunoglobulin (e.g., B-1 cells as described herein), thereby reducing the amount of the pathogenic immunoglobulin and/or B cells present in the subject.

[0182] The methods described herein may comprise removing from the subject or inactivating a pathogenic immunoglobulin, e.g., a pathogenic IgM as described herein, and/or B-cells producing the pathogenic IgM (e.g., B-1 cells as described herein), thereby reducing the amount of the pathogenic immunoglobulin and/or B cells present in the subject.

[0183] In one embodiment, the removing or inactivating step is performed ex vivo. The pathogenic immunoglobulins or B cells can be removed by hemoperfusion. Alternatively, the B cells can be removed using a B cell-specific antibody (e.g., an anti-B-1 antibody or an anti-CD5 antibody or anti-CD 11 G/CD 18). The pathogenic immunoglobulin, e.g., an IgM, can be removed by contacting blood from a subject with an immobilized antigen (e.g., an ischemia-specific antigen) or an immobilized anti-idiotypic antibody. The removing or inactivating step of the pathogenic immunoglobulin may be performed by administering an anti-idiotypic antibody to the subject. In another embodiment, the removing or inactivating step of the B cell is performed by administering to the subject a B cell targeting moiety (e.g., an antibody or an antigen binding fragment thereof, or an antigen) coupled to a toxin, e.g., ricin or diphteria toxin. The subject is a mammal, e.g., a rodent (e.g., a mouse) or a primate (e.g., a human). In an exemplary embodiment, the subject has sustained a reperfusion or ischemic injury following a naturally occurring episode, e.g., as a stroke, and the removing step is carried out within minutes, one to five hours, five to ten hours, ten to twenty hours, one to five days, following the naturally occurring episode. In another exemplary embodiment, the reperfusion or ischemic injury occurs in a cardiovascular tissue, e.g., the heart, and the reperfusion or ischemic injury is prevented and/or decreased by, removing from the subject, the pathogenic immunoglobulin, and/or the B cells, prior to, during, and/or following the surgical procedure. For example, the removing step can be carried out at least one to five hours, five to ten hours, ten to twenty hours, or one, two or three days prior to the surgical procedure. The removing step can also be continued for appropriate time intervals during and after the surgical procedure.

6.7 Diagnostic Assays

[0184] The invention further provides a method for detecting the presence of a natural IgM antibody in a biological sample. Detection of a natural IgM antibody in a subject, particularly mammal, and especially a human, will provide a diagnostic method for diagnosis of an inflammatory disease or condition in the subject. In general, the method involves contacting the biological sample with a compound or an agent capable of detecting natural IgM antibody of the invention or a nucleic acid of the invention in the sample. The term "biological sample" when used in reference to a diagnostic assay is intended to include tissues, cells and biological fluids isolated from a subject, as well as tissues, cells and fluids present within a subject.

[0185] The detection method of the invention may be used to detect the presence of a natural IgM antibody or a nucleic acid of the invention in a biological sample in vitro as well as in vivo. For example, in vitro techniques for detection of a nucleic acid of the invention include Northern hybridizations and in situ hybridizations. In vitro techniques for detection of polypeptides of the invention include enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), Western blots, immunoprecipitations, immunofluorescence, radioimmunoassays and competitive binding assays.

[0186] Nucleic acids for diagnosis may be obtained from an infected individual's cells and tissues, such as bone, blood, muscle, cartilage, and skin. Nucleic acids, e.g., DNA and RNA, may be used directly for detection or may be amplified, e.g., enzymatically by using PCR or other amplification technique, prior to analysis. Using amplification, characterization of the species and strain of prokaryote present in an individual, may be made by an analysis of the genotype of the prokaryote gene. Deletions and insertions can be detected by a change in size of the amplified product in comparison to the genotype of a reference sequence. Point mutations can be identified by hybridizing a nucleic acid, e.g., amplified DNA, to a nucleic acid of the invention, which nucleic acid may be labeled. Perfectly matched sequences can be distinguished from mismatched duplexes by RNase digestion or by differences in melting temperatures. DNA sequence differences may also be detected by alterations in the electrophoretic mobility of the DNA fragments in gels, with or without denaturing agents, or by direct DNA sequencing. See, e.g. Myers et al., Science, 230: 1242 (1985). Sequence changes at specific locations also may be revealed by nuclease protection assays, such as RNase and S1 protection or a chemical cleavage method. See, e.g., Cotton et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., USA, 85: 4397-4401 (1985).

[0187] Agents for detecting a nucleic acid of the invention, e.g., comprising the sequence set forth in a subject nucleic acid sequence, include labeled nucleic acid probes capable of hybridizing to a nucleic acid of the invention. The nucleic acid probe can comprise, for example, the full length sequence of a nucleic acid of the invention, or an equivalent thereof, or a portion thereof, such as an oligonucleotide of at least 15, 30, 50, 100, 250 or 500 nucleotides in length and sufficient to specifically hybridize under stringent conditions to a subject nucleic acid sequence, or the complement thereof. Agents for detecting a polypeptide of the invention, e.g., comprising an amino acid sequence of a subject amino acid sequence, include labeled anti-antibodies capable of binding to a natural IgM antibody of the invention. Anti-idiotypic antibodies may be polyclonal, or alternatively, monoclonal. An intact anti-idiotypic antibody, or a fragment thereof can be used. Labeling the probe or antibody also encompasses direct labeling of the probe or antibody by coupling (e.g., physically linking) a detectable substance to the probe or antibody, as well as indirect labeling of the probe or antibody by reactivity with another reagent that is directly labeled. Examples of indirect labeling include detection of a primary antibody using a fluorescently labeled secondary antibody and end-labeling of a DNA probe with biotin such that it can be detected with fluorescently labeled streptavidin.

[0188] In certain embodiments, detection of a nucleic acid of the invention in a biological sample involves the use of a probe/primer in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (see, e.g. U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,683,195 and 4,683,202), such as anchor PCR or RACE PCR, or, alternatively, in a ligation chain reaction (LCR) (see, e.g., Landegran et al. (1988) Science 241:1077-1080; and Nakazawa et al. (1994) PNAS 91:360-364), the latter of which can be particularly useful for distinguishing between orthologs of polynucleotides of the invention (see Abravaya et al. (1995) Nucleic Acids Res. 23:675-682). This method can include the steps of collecting a sample of cells from a patient, isolating nucleic acid (e.g., genomic, mRNA or both) from the cells of the sample, contacting the nucleic acid sample with one or more primers which specifically hybridize to a nucleic acid of the invention under conditions such that hybridization and amplification of the polynucleotide (if present) occurs, and detecting the presence or absence of an amplification product, or detecting the size of the amplification product and comparing the length to a control sample.

[0189] In one aspect, the present invention contemplates a method for detecting the presence of a natural IgM antibody in a sample, the method comprising: (a) providing a sample to be tested for the presence of a natural IgM antibody; (b) contacting the sample with an anti-idiotypic antibody reactive against about eight consecutive amino acid residues of a subject amino acid sequence from such species under conditions which permit association between the anti-idiotypic antibody and its ligand; and (c) detecting interaction of the anti-idiotypic antibody with its ligand, thereby detecting the presence of a natural IgM antibody in the sample.

[0190] In another aspect, the present invention contemplates a method for detecting the presence of a natural IgM antibody in a sample, the method comprising: (a) providing a sample to be tested for the presence of a natural IgM antibody; (b) contacting the sample with an anti-idiotypic antibody that binds specifically to a polypeptide of the invention from such species under conditions which permit association between the anti-idiotypic antibody and its ligand; and (c) detecting interaction of the anti-idiotypic antibody with its ligand, thereby detecting the presence of such species in the sample.

[0191] In yet another example, the present invention contemplates a method for diagnosing a patient suffering from an inflammatory disease or condition related to the presence of a natural IgM antibody, comprising: (a) obtaining a biological sample from a patient; (b) detecting the presence or absence of a polypeptide of the invention, e.g., a natural IgM antibody, or a nucleic acid encoding a polypeptide of the invention, in the sample; and (c) diagnosing a patient suffering from such an inflammatory disease or condition based on the presence of a polypeptide of the invention, or a nucleic acid encoding a polypeptide of the invention, in the patient sample.

[0192] The diagnostic assays of the invention may also be used to monitor the effectiveness of a treatment in an individual suffering from an inflammatory disease or condition related to a natural IgM antibody. For example, the presence and/or amount of a nucleic acid of the invention or a polypeptide of the invention can be detected in an individual suffering from an inflammatory disease or condition related to a natural IgM antibody before and after treatment with a natural IgM antibody therapeutic agent. Any change in the level of a polynucleotide or polypeptide of the invention after treatment of the individual with the therapeutic agent can provide information about the effectiveness of the treatment course. In particular, no change, or a decrease, in the level of a polynucleotide or polypeptide of the invention present in the biological sample will indicate that the therapeutic is successfully combating such disease or disorder.

[0193] Alternatively, polypeptides of the invention, e.g., natural IgM antibodies, can be detected in vivo in a subject by introducing into the subject a labeled antibody specific for a polypeptide of the invention, e.g., an anti-idiotypic antibody to detect natural IgM antibodies. For example, the anti-idiotypic antibody can be labeled with a radionuclide marker whose presence and location in a subject can be detected by standard imaging techniques.

[0194] A "radionuclide" refers to molecule that is capable of generating a detectable image that can be detected either by the naked eye or using an appropriate instrument, e.g. positron emission tomography (PET), and single photon emission tomography (SPECT). Radionuclides useful within the present disclosure include penetrating photon emitters including gamma emitters and X-ray emitters. These rays accompany nuclear transformation such as electron capture, beta emission and isomeric transition. Radionuclides useful include those with photons between 80 and 400 keV and positron producers, 511 keV annihilation photons and acceptable radiation doses due to absorbed photons, particles and half-life. Radionuclides include radioactive isotopes of an element. Examples of radionuclides include .sup.123I, .sup.125I, .sup.99mTc, .sup.18F, .sup.68Ga, .sup.62Cu, .sup.111IN, .sup.131I, .sup.188RE, .sup.90Y, .sup.212Bi, .sup.211AT, .sup.89Sr, .sup.166Ho, .sup.153Sm, .sup.67Cu, .sup.64Cu, .sup.100Pd, .sup.109Pd, .sup.67Ga, .sup.94Tc, .sup.105Rh, .sup.95Ru, .sup.177Lu, .sup.170Lu, .sup.11C, and .sup.76Br.

[0195] In one embodiment, an anti-idiotypic antibody that recognizes a natural IgM antibody of the present invention may be labeled with .sup.99MTC. .sup.9mTc, a commonly used radionuclide in Nuclear Medicine, combines desirable physical properties with a 6 hr half-life and a 140-KeV gamma energy (85% as gamma photons) and widespread availability, since it can readily be eluted from molybdenum generators.

[0196] The imaging agents of the disclosure may be used in the following manner. An effective amount of the imaging agent (from 1 to 50 mCi) may be combined with a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier for use in imaging studies. In accordance with the disclosure, "an effective amount" of the imaging agent of the disclosure is defined as an amount sufficient to yield an acceptable image using equipment which is available for clinical use. An effective amount of the imaging agent of the disclosure may be administered in more than one injection. Effective amounts of the imaging agent of the disclosure will vary according to factors such as the degree of susceptibility of the individual, the age, sex, and weight of the individual, idiosyncratic responses of the individual and dosimetry. Effective amounts of the imaging agent of the disclosure will also vary according to instrument and film-related factors. Optimization of such factors is well within the level of skill of a person skilled in the art.

[0197] The amount of imaging agent used for diagnostic purposes and the duration of the imaging study will depend upon the nature and severity of the condition being treated, on the nature of therapeutic treatments which the patient has undergone, and on the idiosyncratic responses of the patient. Ultimately, the attending physician will decide the amount of imaging agent to administer to each individual patient and the duration of the imaging study.

[0198] The pharmaceutically acceptable carrier for an imaging agent of the disclosure may include any and all solvents, dispersion media, coatings, antibacterial and antifungal agents, pharmaceutically active substances is well known in the art. The imaging agent of the disclosure isotonic agents, absorption delaying agents, and the like. The use of such media and agents for may further be administered to an individual in an appropriate diluent or adjuvant, co-administered with enzyme inhibitors or in an appropriate carrier such as human serum albumin or liposomes. Supplementary active compounds can also be incorporated into the imaging agent of the disclosure. Pharmaceutically acceptable diluents; include saline and aqueous buffer solutions. Adjuvants contemplated herein include resorcinols, non-ionic surfactants such as polyoxyethylene oleyl ether and nhexadecyl polyethylene ether. Enzyme inhibitors include pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, diethylpyrocarbonate, and trasylol. Liposomes include water-in-oil-in-water CGF emulsions as well as conventional liposomes (Strejan et al. (1984).1 Neuroimmunol. 7, 27).

[0199] In one embodiment, the imaging agent of the disclosure is administered parenterally as injections (intravenous, intramuscular or subcutaneous). The imaging agent may be formulated as a sterile, pyrogen-free, parenterally acceptable aqueous solution. The preparation of such parenterally acceptable solutions, having due regard to pH, isotonicity, stability, and the like, is within the skill in the art. Certain pharmaceutical compositions of this disclosure suitable for parenteral administration comprise one or more imaging agents in combination with one or more pharmaceutically acceptable sterile powders which may be reconstituted into sterile injectable solutions or dispersions just prior to use, which may contain antioxidants, buffers, bacteriostats, solutes which render the formulation isotonic with the blood of the intended recipient or suspending or thickening agents. A formulation for injection should contain, in addition to the cardiovascular imaging agent, an isotonic vehicle such as sodium chloride solution, Ringer's solution, dextrose solution, dextrose and sodium chloride solution, lactated Ringer's solution, dextran solution, sorbitol solution, a solution containing polyvinyl alcohol, or an osmotically balanced solution comprising a surfactant and a viscosity-enhancing agent, or other vehicle as known in the art. The formulation used in the present disclosure may also contain stabilizers, preservatives, buffers, antioxidants, or other additives known to those of skill in the art.

[0200] The invention also encompasses kits for detecting the presence of a natural IgM antibody in a biological sample. For example, the kit can comprise a labeled compound or agent capable of detecting a polynucleotide or polypeptide of the invention in a biological sample; means for determining the amount of a natural IgM antibody in the sample; and means for comparing the amount of a natural IgM antibody in the sample with a standard. An unlabeled compound may also be provided with instructions for labeling the compound. The compound or agent can be packaged in a suitable container. The kit can further comprise instructions for using the kit to detect a polynucleotide or polypeptide of the invention.

EXEMPLIFICATION

[0201] The invention, having been generally described, may be more readily understood by reference to the following examples, which are included merely for purposes of illustration of certain aspects and embodiments of the present invention, and are not intended to limit the invention in any way.

Example 1: Mechanism of Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

[0202] This Example shows that mice deficient in the complement system were resistant to ischemia-reperfusion injury.

[0203] To examine the mechanism of ischemia-reperfusion injury, mice deficient in complement C3 were treated in the hindlimb model. The C3-/- mice were partially protected from injury based on an approximate 50% reduction in permeability index (see Weiser et al. (1996) J. Exp. Med. 1857-1864). Thus, complement C3 is essential for induction of full injury in this murine model.

[0204] The experiments in Weiser et al. did not identify how complement was activated. The serum complement system can be activated by at least three distinct pathways, classical, lectin or alternative. Knowing which pathway is involved, is important as it suggests a mechanism for injury. For example, the classical pathways is activated very efficiently by IgM and IgG isotypes of immunoglobulin or by the serum recognition protein C-reactive protein. Whereas, the lectin pathway is activated following recognition of specific carbohydrates such as mannan by mannan binding lectin (MBL) (Epstein et al., (1996) Immunol 8, 29-35). In both pathways, complement C4 is required in forming an enzyme complex with C2 that catalyzes cleavage of the central component C3. By contrast, the alternative pathway activates spontaneously leading to conversion of C3 to its active form (C3b) and attachment to foreign- or self-tissues. The pathway is tightly regulated as all host cells express inhibitors of amplification of the complement pathway by inactivating, or displacing the C3 convertase (Muller-Eberhard, H. J., (1988) Ann. Rev. Biochem. 57, 321-347). One approach for determining the pathway involved is use of mice deficient in C4, i.e., cannot form C3 convertase via classical or lectin pathways. Comparison of mice deficient in either C3 or C4 with wild type (WT) controls in the hindlimb model, revealed that C4 was also required for induction of full injury (Weiser et al. supra). This finding was important as it suggested that antibody or MBL might be involved.

Example 2: Natural IgM Mediates Ischemia Reperfusion (I/R) Injury

[0205] This Example shows that mice deficient in immunoglobulin were resistant to ischemia reperfusion injury.

[0206] To determine if antibody was involved in mediating I/R injury, mice totally deficient in immunoglobulin, RAG2-/- (recombinase activating gene-2 deficient) were characterized along with the complement deficient animals in the intestinal model. Significantly, the RAG-2-/- mice were protected to a similar level as observed in the complement deficient animals (Weiser et al. supra). Since the RAG2-/- animals are also missing mature lymphocytes, it was important to determine that the pathogenic effect was antibody dependent (Shinkai et al. (1992) Cell 68, 855-867). To confirm that injury was mediated by serum antibody, the deficient animals were reconstituted with either normal mouse sera (Weiser et al. supra) or purified IgM (Williams et al. (1999) J. Appl. Physiol 86; 938-42). In both cases, the reconstituted RAG-2-/- mice were no longer protected and injury was restored. In the latter experiments, a model of intestinal injury was used as in this model, injury is thought to be mediated primarily by complement.

[0207] The interpretation of these results is that during the period of ischemia, neoantigens are either expressed or exposed on the endothelial cell surface. Circulating IgMs appear to recognize the new determinant, bind and activate classical pathway of complement. While the nature of the antigen is not known, IgM rather than IgG seems to be primarily responsible for activation of complement as reconstitution of deficient mice with pooled IgG did not significantly restore injury in the mice. An alternative hypothesis is that there is another initial event such as the MBL pathway that recognizes the altered endothelial surface, induces low level complement activation which in turn exposes new antigenic sites and the pathway is amplified by binding of IgM.

Example 3: Pathogenic IgM is a Product of B-1 Cells

[0208] Since a major fraction of circulating IgM is thought to represent natural antibody, i.e. product of rearranged germline genes, it is possible that mice bearing deficiencies in the B-1 fraction of lymphocytes might also be protected. B-1 cells have a distinct phenotype from more conventional B-2 cells in that they express low levels of IgD and CD23 and a major fraction express the cell surface protein CDS (Hardy et al., (1994) Immunol. Rev.: 137, 91; Kantor et al. (1993) Annu. Rev. Immunol. 11, S01-538, 1993. B-1 cells are also distinguished by reduced circulation in mice, limited frequency in the peripheral lymph nodes and spleen and are primarily localized within the peritoneal cavity. To examine a role for B-1 cells as a source of pathogenic IgM, antibody-deficient mice (RAG-2-/-) were reconstituted with 5.times.105 peritoneal B-1 cells and rested approximately 30 days before treatment. Circulating IgM levels reach a near normal range within a month following adoptive transfer. Characterization of the B-1 cell reconstituted mice in the intestinal ischemia model confirmed that B-1 cells were a major source of pathogenic IgM (see Williams et al. (1999) supra). This was an important observation because the repertoire of B-1 cell natural antibody is considerably more limited than would be expected for conventional B-2 cells. Therefore, it is possible that the pathogenic antibody represents a product of the germline.

Example 4: Cr2-/- Mice are Protected from Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

[0209] The initial characterization of Cr2-/- knockout mice revealed an approximate SO % reduction in the frequency of B-1a or CDS+B-1 cells (Ahearn et al. (1996) Immunity 4: 2S 1-262). Although characterization of another strain of Cr2-deficient mice did not identify a similar reduction (Molina et al. (1996) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93, 33 S7-3361). Whether the difference in frequency of CDS+cells was due to variation in strain background or environmental differences is not known. Despite the reduced frequency of B-1 a cells in the Cr2-/- mice, circulating levels of IgM were within the normal range. These findings suggested that the repertoire of IgM might be different in the Cr2-deficient animals. To test this hypothesis, mice in the intestinal J/R model were characterized. Surprisingly, the Cr2-/- mice were equally protected as the complete-antibody deficient mice (FIG. 3). Comparison of survival over a five-day period following treatment in the intestinal model demonstrated a significant increase in mortality of the WT compared to Cr2-deficient animals. Consistent with an increased mortality, a dramatic reduction in injury was observed in tissue sections harvested from treated WT or Cr2-/- deficient mice.

[0210] Extensive injury to the mucosal layer of the intestine was observed in WT mice or Cr2-/- mice reconstituted with pooled IgM or B-1 cells. By contrast, tissue sections isolated from treated Cr2-/- mice were similar to that of sham controls. Thus, despite normal circulating levels of IgM, the Cr2-deficient mice were protected from injury. These results not only confirm the importance of B-1 cells as a source of pathogenic antibody but suggest that the complement system is somehow involved in formation or maintenance of the repertoire of natural antibody. For example, complement may be involved in positive selection of B-1 cells.

Example 5: Identification of Pathogenic IgMs

[0211] This Example describes the generation of a specific hybridoma clone from normal B-1 cells and the identification of one clone that produces a pathogenic IgM. The pathogenic IgM was shown to restore injury in vivo to antibody deficient mice.

[0212] Studies in mice bearing a deficiency in complement receptors CD21/CD35, revealed that the mice were missing the pathogenic antibody. This finding was unexpected because they have a normal level of IgM in their blood. These findings led to the hypothesis that a special population of B cells termed B-1 cells are responsible for secreting the pathogenic IgM. For example, engraftment of the receptor deficient mice (Cr2-/-) with B-1 cells from normal mice restored injury, confirming the importance of B-1 cells. To identify thy specific antibody or antibodies responsible for injury, a panel of hybridoma clones were constructed from an enriched pool of peritoneal B-1 cells harvested from normal mice. The general approach for preparing hybridomas from enriched fraction of peritoneal cells includes harvesting peritoneal cells from mice treated 7 days earlier with IL-10 and subsequently enriched for CD23 negative B cells by negative selection with magnetic beads. Enriched B cells are analyzed by FACS following staining with IgM, Mac-I and CD23 specific Mab. The enriched population is further activated by culturing with LPS for 24 hours. Activated cells are hybridized with fusion partner myeloma cells in the presence of PEG and grown in HAT-selective medium. Hybridomas are screened for IgM secreting clones by ELISA, and positive wells are expanded for purification of IgM.

[0213] Twenty-two IgM-secreting hybridoma clones were analyzed by pooling an equal amount I IgM restored injury similar to that seen with pooled IgM from serum. This finding confirmed of IgM product from each of the clones. Treatment of antibody-deficient mice with the pooled that the pathogenic IgM was among the twenty-two hybridomas produced. By dividing the pools into two fractions, i.e., 1-11 and 12-22, and treatment mice with the two fractions, the pathogenic antibody was found to fractionate with the pool that included clone #22. Finally, mice were reconstituted with either clone 17 or 22. Clone 22 restored injury whereas the other clones did not (see FIG. 4).

Example 6: Complement Involvement in B-1 Cell Selection

[0214] Two different models have been proposed to explain the development of B-1 cells. The lineage hypothesis proposes that B-1 cells develop in early fetal life as a distinct population (Kantor et al. (1993) supra). Alternatively, B-1 cells develop from the same progenitors as conventional B cells but depending on their environment, i.e., encounter with antigen, they develop into B-1 or retain the B-2 cell phenotype (Wortis, H. H. (1992) Int. Rev. Immunol. 8, 235; Clarke, J. (1998) Exp. Med. 187, 1325-1334). Irrespective of their origin, it is known that B-1 cells are not replenished from adult bone marrow at the same frequency as B-2 cells and that their phenotype is more similar to that of early fetal liver B cells or neonatal bone marrow (BM) cells. Consistent with an early origin, their repertoire tends to be biased towards expression of more proximal VH genes and N-nucleotide addition is limited (Gu et al. (1990) EMBO J 9, 2133; Feeney, J. (1990) Exp. Med. 172, 1377). It seems reasonable that given the reduced replenishment by adult BM stem cells, B-1 cells are self-renewed and that antigen stimulation might be important in their renewal, expansion or even initial selection (Hayakawa et al., (1986) Eur. J. Immunol. 16, 1313). Indeed inherent to the conventional model, B-1 cells must be antigen selected.

[0215] Evidence in support of a B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling requirement for positive selection of B-1 cells comes from mice bearing mutations that alter BCR signaling. For example, impairment of BCR signaling through CD 19, vav, or Btk dramatically affects development of B-1 cells. By contrast, loss of negative selection such as in CD22- or SHIP-I deficient mice can lead to an increase in B-1 cell frequency (O'Keefe et al. (1996) Science 274, 798-80 I; Shultz et al. (1993) Cell 73, 1445.). Recent, elegant studies with mice bearing two distinct 1 g transgenes, V.sub.H12 (B-1 cell phenotype) or V.sub.HB1-8 (B-2 cell phenotype) support the view that B-1 cells are positively selected by self-antigens. For example, B cells expressing V.sub.H12 either alone or together with B1-8 developed a B-1 cell phenotype. Whereas, few if any B cells were identified that expressed the B1-8 transgene only. Thus, these results suggested that encounter of transgenic B cells with self-PtC resulted in expansion of those expressing V.sub.H12. Selection of B-1 cells was recently reported by Hardy et al. (1994) Immunol. Rev. 137, 91). In their model, B cells expressing an immunoglobulin transgene specific for Thy 1.1 were selected and expanded in mice expressing the cognate antigen. By contrast, transgene+B-1 cells were not found in mice that expressed the alternative allotype Thy 1.2.

[0216] Where does complement fit into B-1 cell development? The overall reduction in B-1a cell frequency and the more specific loss of B-1 cells expressing IgM involved in IIR injury suggests a role for CD21/CD35 in either positive selection or maintenance of B-1a cells. One possible role for complement is that it enhances BCR signaling on encounter with cognate antigen. Biochemical studies and analysis of CD21/CD35 deficient mice demonstrate the importance of co-receptor signaling in activation and survival of conventional B cells (Carroll, M. C., (1998) Ann. Rev. Immunol. 16, 545-568; Fearon et al. (1995) Annu. Rev. Immunol. 13, 127-149). It is very likely that B-1 cells likewise utilize co-receptor signaling to enhance the BCR signal. For example, bacteria express typical B-1 cell antigens such as phosphoryl choline and it is not unreasonable that coating of bacteria with complement ligand C3d would enhance crosslinking of the co-receptor with the BCR and enhance overall signaling. Thus, antigens expressed at lower concentrations might require complement enhancement in order for the cognate B-cell to recognize it and expand or be positively selected. Another role for complement receptors is in localizing antigen on follicular dendritic cells (FDC) within the lymphoid compartment. However, since the major population of B-1 cells occupy the peritoneal tissues it is not clear if they would encounter FDC within lymphoid structures. The actual site or sites in which B-1 cells undergo positive selection are not known. It is possible that they must encounter cognate antigen in early fetal development or in neonatal BM. If this is the case, it might be expected that complement receptors on stromal cells within these compartments bind antigen for presentation to B cells. It is possible that complement receptors could participate in both stages of development. First, they might enhance antigens signaling in initial positive selection. Secondly, as selected B-1 cells are replenished at peripheral sites, complement receptors might again be involved in enhancement of BCR signaling.

[0217] FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram of the proposed role for complement and complement receptors in positive selection of peritoneal B-1 lymphocytes. The interaction of complement-ligand coated antigens (self- and non-self) results in co-ligation of the CD21/CD19 co-receptor and BCR on the cell surface leading to enhanced signaling and positive selection.

Example 7: Materials and Methods for Examples 8-11

[0218] Phase Display Peptide Library and Peptide Synthesis

[0219] A 12-mer M-13 phage display library (New England Biolab, Mass.) was screened by 4 rounds with MBL-beads coated with IgM.sup.CM-22 and 2 rounds with IgM.sup.CM-75 according to the manufacturer's recommendation. Phage clones were selected from the enriched pool and the nucleotide sequence of the relevant phage gene determined for at least ten clones. Selected peptides were synthesized with purity>95% in Harvard Proteomic Core or New England Peptide, Inc. (Gardner, Mass.).

[0220] Binding Assays

[0221] ELISA was performed as described earlier (Zhang et al. (2004) PNAS USA 101:3886-91). Briefly, IgM binding to phage or phage-specific peptides was determined by coating a 96-well plate with saturating amounts of antigen. Subsequent to blocking, IgM was added (1 or 10 .mu.g/ml) for 2 hr at 37.degree. C. Plates were washed and then developed with alkaline phosphatase-labeled goat anti-mouse IgM (Sigma, Mo.). Binding of IgM to NMHC-II was determined by culturing 96-well plates previously coated with specific rabbit antibody (NMHC-II A & B; Covance Research Products; NMHC-II C a gift from Dr. Adelstein, NHLBI, NIH, Bethesda, Md.) or pan-myosin He (Sigma, Mo.) with intestinal lysates prepared from IM.sup.cm-22 reconstituted RAG-1.sup.-/- mice either sham treated or treated for ischemia as described (Zhang et al. (2004) PNAS USA 101:3886-91). Lysates were prepared as described for immune precipitation (see below). Alkaline-phosphatase labeled goat anti-mouse IgM (Sigma, Mo.) was then used to detect bound IgM.

[0222] Intestinal RI Model

[0223] Surgical protocol for RI was performed as previously described (Zhang et al. (2004) PNAS USA 101:3886-91). Briefly, a laparotomy is performed, and a microclip (125 g pressure, Roboz, Md.) was applied to the superior mesenteric artery and bilateral circulation limited with silk sutures flanking a 20 cm segment of the jejunum. After 40 minutes of ischemia, the microclip was removed, and reperfusion of the mesenteric vasculature was confirmed by the return of pulsation to the vascular arcade and a change to pink color. The incision was closed, and an animals kept warm for 3 hours. Reconstituted RAG-1.sup.-/- animals received either IgM mixed with peptide or saline in 0.2 ml volume intravenously 30 min before the initial laparotomy. WT animals were treated with saline or peptide i.v. 5 minutes prior to reperfusion. At the end of reperfusion, the ischemi segment of the jejunum was harvested and the central 4 cm was cut for pathological analysis.

[0224] Histopathology and Immuno-Histochemistry Analysis

[0225] Cryostat sections of intestinal tissues were stained by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and examined by light microscopy for mucosal damage. Pathology score was assessed based on procedure by Chiu (Chiu et al, Arch Surg 101: 484-488, 1970; Chiu, et al, Arch Surg 101: 478-483, 1970) that included direct inspection of all microvilli over a 4 cm stretch of jejuneum as described. Zhang et al. (2004) PNAS USA 101:3886-91. For immuno-fluorescence, cryosections fixed with 4% (w/v) paraformaldehyde were incubated for varying periods with either biotin-labeled anti-mouse IgM (Becton Dickinson, Calif.) followed by 1 hour with streptavidin-Alexa-568 (1:500 dilution, Molecular Probes, OR). C4 deposition was detected by staining with FITC-labeled rabbit anti-huC4c (DAKO, Colo.), followed by anti-rabbit-Alexa 488 (Molecular Probes, OR). The specificity of anti-C4c staining was confirmed by staining serial sections with biotin-labeled anti-mouse C4 for 1 hour followed by streptavidin-FITC (Becton Dickinson, Calif.). C3 deposition was detected by treating with FITC-labeled anti-C3 (DAKO, Colo.). Sections were mounted in Anti-fade Mounting Medium with DAPI (Molecular Probes, OR).

[0226] SPR Analysis of Peptide Binding to Antibody

[0227] An IgM (IgM.sup.CM-22 or IgM.sup.CM-31) antibody was immobilized by amine coupling in a BiaCore SPR CMS.TM. chip flowcell at a density of 33,400 response units (RU) .about.33 ng/mm.sup.2 as described. Vorup-Jensen et al, PNAS USA 100: 1873-1878, 2003. Briefly, a reference flow cell was prepared by coupling of ethanolamine-HCl. Peptides, diluted in PBS running buffer, were flowed separately over the IgM-coupled surface and the reference at a rate of 10 .mu.l/min. at 25.degree. C. and with the data collection rate at 10 Hz. The injection phase had a duration of 240 s (end of injection phases are marked by arrow heads in FIGS. 9A, B and D). Binding isotherms were derived by subtracting the response in the reference cell from the response of the IgM-coupled surface. Following each run, the surface was regenerated by injecting 40 .mu.l 0.05% (v/v) polyoxyethylenesorbitan monolaurate/PBS.

[0228] Immune Precipitation

[0229] Frozen tissues were homogenized in a lysis buffer containing detergent and a cocktail of enzyme inhibitors. A sample of lysate is analyzed for total protein content (Bio-Rad kit) to insure similar levels of protein for analysis. Lysates are mixed with sepharose beads coated with rat anti-mouse IgM for 1 hr at 4.degree. C. Subsequently, beads were pelleted gently, washed in lysis buffer and then boiled in SDS-sample buffer under reducing conditions to elute bound complexes. Samples were fractionated on 6% (w/v) polyacrylamide SDS gels and subsequently fixed and then stained with either coomassie blue or silver stain to identify protein bands.

[0230] Protein Identification by Tandem Mass Spectrometry

[0231] Individual Coomassie Blue-stained bands were excised from SDS-gels, destained, and subjected to enzyme digestion as described previously. Borodovsky et al, Chem Biol 9: 1149-1159, 2002. The peptides were separated using a nanoflow liquid coupled chromatography system (Waters Cap LC) and amino acid sequences determined by tandem mass spectrometer (Q-TOF micro, Waters, Mass.). MS/MS data were processed and subjected to database searches using Mascot (Matrixscience) against Swissprot, TREMBL/New or the NCBY non-redundant database.

Example 8: Identification of Asparagine-Rich Peptides that Bind Natural IgM Antibody

[0232] We previously identified a hybridoma clone of a natural IgM antibody (IM.sup.CM-22) that binds ischemic tissue in the intestinal RI model, which support our hypothesis that ischemic tissue was altered relative to normal tissue and that neo-epitopes expressed during ischemia were targets for an innate response to self. To characterize the ligand bound by pathogenic IgM.sup.CM-22, a M-13 phage-display library of random 12-mer amino acid sequences was screened using beads coated with the specific IgM.

[0233] After four rounds of specific screening and two rounds with a control IgM (clone IgM.sup.CM-75), ten phage clones were isolated and the nucleotide sequence of the relevant M-13 gene sequenced. Notably, all ten clones contain sequences rich in asparagine. Five of the clones were selected for a relative binding assay with IgM.sup.CM-22 and one of these clones, P8, which bound with the highest efficiency was selected for further study (Table 4 and FIG. 6A).

TABLE-US-00004 TABLE 4 Phage displayed peptides bind to IgM.sup.CM-22 Phage Clone Sequence SEQ ID NO. P1 YNNNNGNYTYRN 16 P2 ANTRNGATNNNM 18 P3 CDSSCDSVGNCN 20 P4 WNNNGRNACNAN 22 P5 HNSTSNGCNDNV 24 P6 NSNSRYNSNSNN 26 P7 KRNNHNNHNRSN 28 P8 NGNNVNGNRNNN 30 P9 NVANHNNSNHGN 32 P10 SYNNNNHVSNRN 34 Asparagine-rich xNNNxNNxNNNN 14 Consensus

[0234] A 12-amino acid peptide (P8) was synthesized based on the phage sequence and assayed for inhibition of phage P8 binding to IgM.sup.CM-22 (FIG. 6B). Titration of increasing amounts of PB peptide yielded 50% inhibition at an estimated concentration of 10 .mu.mole. This assay indicates a reasonable overall avidity of binding based on multiple binding sites expressed on the phage surface. This result suggested that IgM.sup.CM-22 binding to phage P8 was specific for the peptide region and that the synthetic peptide could be used as a mimotope for the actual antigen. To further characterize binding of P8 peptide to IgM.sup.CM-22, ELISA plates were coated with the peptide and tested with IgM.sup.CM-22 or control IgM.sup.CM-75 for binding (FIG. 6C). At the lower concentration of 1 .mu.g/ml, neither IgM bound above background. However, at 10 .mu.g/ml, significantly more IgM.sup.CM-22 bound than IgM.sup.CM-75. Together, the three results suggest that peptide P8 binds specifically to IgM.sup.CM-22 and can be used for identification of the actual antigen.

Example 9: Asparagine-Rich Peptide PS Blocks Intestinal RI

[0235] Previous studies had demonstrated that intestinal RI in RAG-1.sup.-/- mice was IgM-dependent and that IgM.sup.CM-22 alone was sufficient to restore injury. As expected, reconstitution of RAG-1.sup.-/- mice with IgM.sup.CM-22 but not saline prior to reperfusion resulted in RI (FIG. 7A(i) and FIG. 7B). By contrast, mixing of IgM.sup.CM-22 with P8 prior to injection in ischemic mice significantly blocked apparent injury (mean pathology score 6.+-.3 versus 31.+-.13; p<0.001) (FIG. 7Aii and FIG. 7B). Previous titration of peptide with IgMCM-22 suggested an optimal concentration of 10 .mu.M of PS was sufficient to block 50-100 .mu.g of IgM.sup.CM-22 (0.1-0.2 .mu.M).

[0236] Immunohistological analyses of serial sections of reperfused intestinal tissue Gejuneum) following RI identified co-localization of IgM and complement C4 and C3 within the microvilli in RAG-1.sup.-/- mice reconstituted with IgM.sup.CM-22 By contrast, sections prepared from mice receiving P8 showed no evidence of IgM or complement binding. No binding of IgM or complement was observed in IgM.sup.CM-22 reconstituted sham controls, nor RAG-1.sup.-/- mice reconstituted with control IgM.sup.CM-31 or RAG-1.sup.-/- mice reconstituted with saline only (Zhang et al. (2004) PNAS USA 101:3886-91). Thus, P8 blocks the binding of IgM.sup.CM-22 and the induction of injury in vivo.

[0237] The identification of a single natural IgM antibody that could initiate RI in RAG-1.sup.-/- mice led to the general question of the number of possible neo-epitopes expressed on ischemic tissues and the corresponding number of pathogenic clones of IgM in the repertoire of wild type (WT) mice. It might be predicted that the number of antibodies is limited based on the current understanding that the repertoire of natural IgMs is relatively small. Herzenberg et al, Immunol Today I 4: 79-S3, discussion 88-90, 1993; Arnold et al, J Exp Med 179: I 5S5-I 595, I 994. Moreover, ligands of natural IgM antibodies are considered highly conserved structures and also are probably limited in number. To test if PS represented a mimotope for a major self-antigen, WT mice were pretreated with PS (approximately 10 .mu.M) five minutes prior to reperfusion in the intestinal model. Analysis of jejuneum tissues of mice treated with saline or a control peptide prior to reperfusion identified significant injury to the microvilli as expected (FIG. 7Aiii). By contrast, pretreatment of WT mice with P8 five minutes prior to reperfusion blocked apparent injury (mean pathology score 5.+-.3 versus 24.+-.16 and 23.+-.19; p<0.005 and 0.027, respectively) (FIG. 7A(iv) and FIG. 7B). As expected, IgM, C4 and C3 co-localized within microvilli of RI treated WT mice. By contrast, no apparent deposits of IgM or complement were observed in reperfused tissues of mice administered P8. These results suggest that the number of key epitopes required to initiate RI is limited as a single peptide blocks injury and deposition of IgM and complement.

Example 10: Immunoprecipitation of Self-Peptides with IgM.sup.CM-22

[0238] Using the amino acid sequence of PS, a homology search of the genomic database revealed no exact matches. Therefore, an immune-precipitation approach was used to identify the ischemia antigen/antigens in RAG-14 mice reconstituted with IgM.sup.CM-22.

[0239] RAG-1.sup.-/- mice were reconstituted with an optimal amount of IgM.sup.CM-22, treated for intestinal ischemia and reperfused for varying lengths of time, i.e., 0 minutes or 15 minutes before harvesting of tissues. Immune complexes of IgM-antigen were isolated from lysates of jejuneum at the varying time points and fractionated by SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions. Analysis of the stained gels indicated common bands at lower molecular weight for all time points (FIG. 8A). However, at 15 minutes, a band at high molecular weight (>200 kD) was identified (FIG. 8A).

[0240] Protein bands were excised from stained gels, enzymatically digested and peptides analyzed by Tandem Mass Spec as described. Kocks et al, Mol Cell Proteomics 2: 1188-1197, 2003. Analysis of eluted peptides indicated that the common bands at approximately 25, 50 and 75 kDa represented immunoglobulin light chain (Le), and IgG heavy chain (He) and IgM He, respectively. Analysis of the high molecular weight band yielded peptide sequences homologous to non-muscle myosin heavy chain (NMHC) type II isoforms A and C (Table 5).

TABLE-US-00005 TABLE 5 Mass Spectrometry Results Mass Spectroscopy Matched proteins sequenced peptides Mouse non muscle myosin VVFQEFR heavy chain II-A (MS-1; SEQ ID NO: 39) (gi/20137006; GenBank.TM. CNGVLEGIR Accession NO: NP_071855) (MS-2; SEQ ID NO: 40) total score = 130; KFDQLLAEEK peptides matched = 6 (MS-3; SEQ ID NO: 41) KFDQLLAEEK EQADFAIEALAK (MS-4; SEQ ID NO: 42) QLLQANPILEAFGNAK (MS-5; SEQ ID NO: 43) Mouse non muscle CNGVLEGIR myosin heavy chain VKPLLQVTR II-C (gi/33638127; (MS-6; SEQ ID NO: 44) GenBank.TM. Accession KFDQLLAEEK NO: AAQ24173) KFDQLLAEEK total score = 133; EQADFALEALAK peptides matched = 7 LAQAEEQLEQESR (MS-7; SEQ ID NO: 45) QLLQANPILEAFGNAK (MS-8; SEQ ID NO: 46) *Score is -10XLog (P), where P is the probability that the observed match is a random event. Individual ion scores >53 indicate identity or extensive homology (p < 0.05).

[0241] In similar experiments using lysates prepared from WT mice treated for 3 hours in intestinal RI, a similar size band at 200 kD was also observed and sequence analysis identified NMHC-A and C peptides.

[0242] Three forms of type II NMHC have been identified (A, B and C) in the mouse and human genome. Golomb et al, J Biol Chem 279: 2800-2808, 2004; Kelley et al, J Cell Biol 134: 675-687, 1996. All eukaryotic cells express type II NMHC but the distribution of the three isoforms varies. NMHC-II A and B are approximately 85% homologous; whereas NMHC-II C is approximately 65% similar. Golomb et al, J Biol Chem 279: 2800-2808, 2004. The three isotypes are highly conserved among mice and humans.

[0243] To confirm the binding of IgM.sup.CM-22 to type IINMHC, an ELISA approach was used. Plates were coated with antibody specific for each of the three forms of NMHC or with a panmyosin antibody to capture the relevant antigen from lysates prepared from jejuneum of RAG-mice. Subsequently, IgM.sup.CM-22 or IgM.sup.CM-31 were added and then developed with a labeled anti-mouse IgM antibody. Above background binding of IgM.sup.CM-22 but not IgM.sup.CM-31 to all three of the isoforms of NMHC-II was observed (Figure SB). The combined sequence analysis and ELISA results show that IgM.sup.CM-22 recognizes a conserved region of the type II NMHC.

[0244] To determine whether myosin is exposed to circulating antibody following ischemia, RAG-1.sup.-/- mice were reconstitute with a purified IgG fraction of rabbit anti-pan myosin heavy chain. Analysis of tissues of sham treated RAG-1.sup.-/- following reconstitution with the rabbit IgG mice showed no evidence of injury or deposition of IgG. By contrast, ischemic RAG-1.sup.-/- mice reconstituted with the pan-myosin IgG prior to reperfusion developed significant RI compared to saline controls (33.+-.11 versus 11.+-.8, p<0.025) (Figure SC). Accordingly, myosin is exposed to antibody in circulation following ischemia.

[0245] Comparison of the sequences of the three NMHC-II isoforms with the PS peptide sequence identified one region of apparent homology (Table 6). All three isoforms include a motif of NxxxxNxNx that has similarity with the PS sequence. A 12-amino acid self-peptide (N2) sequence (NMHC-IIC isoform) was prepared for further study.

TABLE-US-00006 TABLE 6 Conserved homologous sequence in NMHC-II A-C Sequence Phage Clone P8 NGNNVNGNRNNN (SEQ ID NO: 30) Consensus xNNNx(N/D)NxN(N/D)N(NN) (SEQ ID NO: 14) NMHC-II Sequence Mouse-IIA (542-556) LMKNMDPLNDI (SEQ ID NO: 36) Human-IIA (585-596) LMKNMDPLNDI Mouse-IIB (592-603) LMKNMDPLNDNV (N2; SEQ ID NO: 38) Human-IIB (592-603) LMKNMDPLNDNV Mouse-IIC (607-619) LMKNMDPLNDNV (N2; SEQ ID NO: 38) Human-IIC (611-622) LMKNMDPLNDNV

[0246] To test that this region bound IgM.sup.CM-22 surface, plasmon resonance analysis was used (FIG. 9). N2 peptide was injected over a surface coupled with IgM.sup.CM-22 (FIG. 9A) and generated a robust response, which corresponded to a K.sub.D of 123.+-.61 .mu.M (mean.+-.SD, n=2) as calculated from the steady-state response levels (FIG. 9C). In contrast, no binding was observed when a control peptide was injected over the specific IgM-coupled surface (FIG. 9B) or when the N2 peptide was injected over a surface coupled with the IgM.sup.CM-31 control (FIG. 9D).

Example 11: Self-Peptide N2 Blocks Intestinal RI

[0247] To test the functional binding of N2 with pathogenic IgM, approximately 100 nmoles of the peptide (or saline control) was mixed with IgM.sup.CM-22 prior to reconstitution of RAG-1.sup.-/- mice and treatment in the RI model. Analysis of histology of tissue sections prepared from the reperfused jejuneum of IgM.sup.CM-22 and saline-treated mice identified injury and deposition of IgM and complement as expected (FIG. 5Ai and 5B). By contrast, mixing the N2 peptide with IgM.sup.CM-22 prior to reperfusion was protective from injury (mean pathology score 13.+-.8 versus 31.+-.10; p<0.049) (FIG. 10Aii and 10B). In addition, no deposition of IgM and complement was observed in reperfused jejuneum when IgM.sup.CM-22 was mixed with the N2 peptide prior to injection in RAG-1.sup.-/- mice. Thus, as observed with the synthetic peptide P8, the self-peptide N2 blocked functional binding of IgM.sup.CM-22 in vivo.

[0248] To test if self-peptide N2 represents the major self-epitope in intestinal RI, WT mice were treated with approximately 40 .mu.M of the synthetic peptide P8 prior to reperfusion in the intestinal model. Histological analysis of tissue sections of saline treated WT mice identified injury and deposition of IgM and complement as expected (FIG. 10Aiii). By contrast, treatment of WT mice with self-peptide N2 blocked both injury (mean pathology score 8.+-.5 versus 22.+-.17) and deposition of IgM and complement (FIG. 10Aiv; FIG. 10B). These results suggest that a conserved region within type II NMHC proteins represents the major epitope for binding of natural IgM following ischemia in the intestinal model.

INCORPORATION BY REFERENCE

[0249] All publications, patents, and patent applications mentioned herein are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety as if each individual publication or patent was specifically and individually indicated to be incorporated by reference. In case of conflict, the present application, including any definitions herein, will control.

[0250] Also incorporated by reference in their entirety are any polynucleotide and polypeptide sequence which reference an accession number correlating to an entry in a public database, such as those maintained by The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) on the world wide web with the extension tigr.org and or the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) on the world wide web with the extension ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

EQUIVALENTS

[0251] Those skilled in the art will recognize, or be able to ascertain using no more than routine experimentation, many equivalents to the specific embodiments of the invention described herein. Such equivalents are intended to be encompassed by the following claims.

Sequence CWU 1

1

651402DNAMus musculus 1caggttcagc tgcagcagtc tggggctgag ctggtgaagc ctggggcctc agtgaagatt 60tcctgcaaag cttctggcta cgcattcagt agctactgga tgaactgggt gaagcagagg 120cctggaaagg gtcttgagtg gattggacag atttatcctg gagatggtga tactaactac 180aacggaaagt tcaagggcaa ggccacactg actgcagaca aatcctccag cacagcctac 240atgcagctca gcagcctgac ctctgaggac tctgcggtct atttctgtgc aagagaagat 300tactacggta gtgactggta cttcgatgtc tggggcacag ggaccacggt caccgtctcc 360tcaggtaagc tggctttttt ctttctgcac attccattct ga 4022133PRTMus musculus 2Gln Val Gln Leu Gln Gln Ser Gly Ala Glu Leu Val Lys Pro Gly Ala 1 5 10 15 Ser Val Lys Ile Ser Cys Lys Ala Ser Gly Tyr Ala Phe Ser Ser Tyr 20 25 30 Trp Met Asn Trp Val Lys Gln Arg Pro Gly Lys Gly Leu Glu Trp Ile 35 40 45 Gly Gln Ile Tyr Pro Gly Asp Gly Asp Thr Asn Tyr Asn Gly Lys Phe 50 55 60 Lys Gly Lys Ala Thr Leu Thr Ala Asp Lys Ser Ser Ser Thr Ala Tyr 65 70 75 80 Met Gln Leu Ser Ser Leu Thr Ser Glu Asp Ser Ala Val Tyr Phe Cys 85 90 95 Ala Arg Glu Asp Tyr Tyr Gly Ser Asp Trp Tyr Phe Asp Val Trp Gly 100 105 110 Thr Gly Thr Thr Val Thr Val Ser Ser Gly Lys Leu Ala Phe Phe Phe 115 120 125 Leu His Ile Pro Phe 130 315DNAMus musculus 3agctactgga tgaac 1545PRTMus musculus 4Ser Tyr Trp Met Asn 1 5 557DNAMus musculus 5cagatttatc ctggagatgg tgatactaac tacaacggaa agttcaaggg caaggcc 57616PRTMus musculus 6Gln Ile Tyr Pro Gly Asp Gly Asp Thr Asn Tyr Asn Gly Lys Phe Lys 1 5 10 15 7324DNAMus musculus 7attgtgatga cccagtctgc tgcttcctta gctgtatctc tggggcagag ggccaccatc 60tcatacaggg ccagcaaaag tgtcagtaca tctggctata gttatatgca ctggaaccaa 120cagaaaccag gacagccacc cagactcctc atctatcttg tatccaacct agaatctggg 180gtccctgcca ggttcagtgg cagtgggtct gggacagact tcaccctcaa catccatcct 240gtggaggagg aggatgctgc aacctattac tgtcagcaca ttagggagct tacacgttcg 300gaggggggac caagctggaa ataa 3248107PRTMus musculus 8Ile Val Met Thr Gln Ser Ala Ala Ser Leu Ala Val Ser Leu Gly Gln 1 5 10 15 Arg Ala Thr Ile Ser Tyr Arg Ala Ser Lys Ser Val Ser Thr Ser Gly 20 25 30 Tyr Ser Tyr Met His Trp Asn Gln Gln Lys Pro Gly Gln Pro Pro Arg 35 40 45 Leu Leu Ile Tyr Leu Val Ser Asn Leu Glu Ser Gly Val Pro Ala Arg 50 55 60 Phe Ser Gly Ser Gly Ser Gly Thr Asp Phe Thr Leu Asn Ile His Pro 65 70 75 80 Val Glu Glu Glu Asp Ala Ala Thr Tyr Tyr Cys Gln His Ile Arg Glu 85 90 95 Leu Thr Arg Ser Glu Gly Gly Pro Ser Trp Lys 100 105 945DNAMus musculus 9agggccagca aaagtgtcag tacatctggc tatagttata tgcac 451015PRTMus musculus 10Arg Ala Ser Lys Ser Val Ser Thr Ser Gly Tyr Ser Tyr Met His 1 5 10 15 1121DNAMus musculus 11cttgtatcca acctagaatc t 21127PRTMus musculus 12Leu Val Ser Asn Leu Glu Ser 1 5 1336DNAArtificial SequenceSynthetic DNA sequencemodified_base(1)..(3)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(1)..(3)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(13)..(15)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(13)..(15)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(22)..(24)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(22)..(24)n is a, c, g, or t 13nnnaayaaya aynnnaayaa ynnnaayaay aayaay 361412PRTArtificial SequenceSynthetic peptideMOD_RES(1)..(1)Variable amino acidMOD_RES(5)..(5)Variable amino acidMOD_RES(8)..(8)Variable amino acid 14Xaa Asn Asn Asn Xaa Asn Asn Xaa Asn Asn Asn Asn 1 5 10 1536DNAArtificial SequenceSynthetic DNA sequencemodified_base(18)..(18)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(18)..(18)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(27)..(27)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(27)..(27)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(33)..(33)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(33)..(33)n is a, c, g, or t 15tayaayaaya ayaayggnaa ytayacntay mgnaay 361612PRTArtificial SequenceSynthetic peptide 16Tyr Asn Asn Asn Asn Gly Asn Tyr Thr Tyr Arg Asn 1 5 10 1736DNAArtificial SequenceSynthetic DNA sequencemodified_base(3)..(3)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(3)..(3)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(9)..(9)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(9)..(9)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(12)..(12)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(12)..(12)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(18)..(18)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(18)..(18)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(21)..(21)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(21)..(21)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(24)..(24)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(24)..(24)n is a, c, g, or t 17gcnaayacnm gnaayggngc nacnaayaay aayatg 361812PRTArtificial SequenceSynthetic peptide 18Ala Asn Thr Arg Asn Gly Ala Thr Asn Asn Asn Met 1 5 10 1936DNAArtificial SequenceSynthetic DNA sequencemodified_base(9)..(9)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(9)..(9)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(12)..(12)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(12)..(12)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(21)..(21)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(21)..(21)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(24)..(24)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(24)..(24)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(27)..(27)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(27)..(27)n is a, c, g, or t 19tgygaywsnw sntgygayws ngtnggnaay tgyaay 362012PRTArtificial SequenceSynthetic peptide 20Cys Asp Ser Ser Cys Asp Ser Val Gly Asn Cys Asn 1 5 10 2136DNAArtificial SequenceSynthetic DNA sequencemodified_base(15)..(15)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(15)..(15)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(18)..(18)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(18)..(18)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(24)..(24)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(24)..(24)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(33)..(33)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(33)..(33)n is a, c, g, or t 21tggaayaaya ayggnmgnaa ygcntgyaay gcnaay 362212PRTArtificial SequenceSynthetic peptide 22Trp Asn Asn Asn Gly Arg Asn Ala Cys Asn Ala Asn 1 5 10 2336DNAArtificial SequenceSynthetic DNA sequencemodified_base(9)..(9)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(9)..(9)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(12)..(12)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(12)..(12)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(15)..(15)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(15)..(15)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(21)..(21)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(21)..(21)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(36)..(36)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(36)..(36)n is a, c, g, or t 23cayaaywsna cnwsnaaygg ntgyaaygay aaygtn 362412PRTArtificial SequenceSynthetic peptide 24His Asn Ser Thr Ser Asn Gly Cys Asn Asp Asn Val 1 5 10 2536DNAArtificial SequenceSynthetic DNA sequencemodified_base(6)..(6)a, c, g, or tmisc_feature(6)..(6)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(12)..(12)a, c, g, or tmisc_feature(12)..(12)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(15)..(15)a, c, g, or tmisc_feature(15)..(15)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(18)..(18)a, c, g, or tmisc_feature(18)..(18)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(21)..(21)a, c, g, or tmisc_feature(21)..(21)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(24)..(24)a, c, g, or tmisc_feature(24)..(24)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(30)..(30)a, c, g, or tmisc_feature(30)..(30)n is a, c, g, or t 25aaywsnaayw snmgntanaa nwsnaaywsn aayaay 362612PRTArtificial SequenceSynthetic peptide 26Asn Ser Asn Ser Arg Tyr Asn Ser Asn Ser Asn Asn 1 5 10 2736DNAArtificial SequenceSynthetic DNA sequencemodified_base(6)..(6)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(6)..(6)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(30)..(30)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(30)..(30)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(33)..(33)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(33)..(33)n is a, c, g, or t 27aarmgnaaya aycayaayaa ycayaaymgn wsnaay 362812PRTArtificial SequenceSynthetic peptide 28Lys Arg Asn Asn His Asn Asn His Asn Arg Ser Asn 1 5 10 2936DNAArtificial SequenceSynthetic DNA sequencemodified_base(6)..(6)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(6)..(6)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(15)..(15)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(15)..(15)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(21)..(21)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(21)..(21)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(27)..(27)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(27)..(27)n is a, c, g, or t 29aayggnaaya aygtnaaygg naaymgnaay aayaay 363012PRTArtificial SequenceSynthetic peptide 30Asn Gly Asn Asn Val Asn Gly Asn Arg Asn Asn Asn 1 5 10 3136DNAArtificial SequenceSynthetic DNA sequencemodified_base(6)..(6)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(6)..(6)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(9)..(9)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(9)..(9)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(24)..(24)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(24)..(24)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(33)..(33)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(33)..(33)n is a, c, g, or t 31aaygtngcna aycayaayaa ywsnaaycay ggnaay 363212PRTArtificial SequenceSynthetic peptide 32Asn Val Ala Asn His Asn Asn Ser Asn His Gly Asn 1 5 10 3336DNAArtificial SequenceSynthetic DNA sequencemodified_base(3)..(3)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(3)..(3)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(24)..(24)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(24)..(24)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(27)..(27)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(27)..(27)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(33)..(33)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(33)..(33)n is a, c, g, or t 33wsntayaaya ayaayaayca ygtnwsnaay mgnaay 363412PRTArtificial SequenceSynthetic peptide 34Ser Tyr Asn Asn Asn Asn His Val Ser Asn Arg Asn 1 5 10 3536DNAArtificial SequenceSynthetic DNA sequencemodified_base(3)..(3)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(3)..(3)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(21)..(21)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(21)..(21)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(24)..(24)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(24)..(24)n is a, c, g, or t 35ytnatgaara ayatggaycc nytnaaygay aayath 363612PRTArtificial SequenceSynthetic peptide 36Leu Met Lys Asn Met Asp Pro Leu Asn Asp Asn Ile 1 5 10 3736DNAArtificial SequenceSynthetic DNA sequencemodified_base(3)..(3)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(3)..(3)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(21)..(21)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(21)..(21)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(24)..(24)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(24)..(24)n is a, c, g, or tmodified_base(36)..(36)a, c, g or tmisc_feature(36)..(36)n is a, c, g, or t 37ytnatgaara ayatggaycc nytnaaygay aaygtn 363812PRTArtificial SequenceSynthetic peptide 38Leu Met Lys Asn Met Asp Pro Leu Asn Asp Asn Val 1 5 10 397PRTMus musculus 39Val Val Phe Gln Glu Phe Arg 1 5 409PRTMus musculus 40Cys Asn Gly Val Leu Glu Gly Ile Arg 1 5 4110PRTMus musculus 41Lys Phe Asp Gln Leu Leu Ala Glu Glu Lys 1 5 10 4212PRTMus musculus 42Glu Gln Ala Asp Phe Ala Ile Glu Ala Leu Ala Lys 1 5 10 4316PRTMus musculus 43Gln Leu Leu Gln Ala Asn Pro Ile Leu Glu Ala Phe Gly Asn Ala Lys 1 5 10 15 449PRTMus musculus 44Val Lys Pro Leu Leu Gln Val Thr Arg 1 5 4513PRTMus musculus 45Leu Ala Gln Ala Glu Glu Gln Leu Glu Gln Glu Ser Arg 1 5 10 4616PRTMus musculus 46Gln Leu Leu Gln Ala Asn Pro Ile Leu Glu Ala Phe Gly Asn Ala Lys 1 5 10 15 477355DNAMus musculus 47tgggcagggc acggaaggct caagaacctg acctgctgca gcttccagtc tcgcgttcgc 60cccaccccgc cgcgccgccc gagcgctcga gaaagtccac tcggaagaac cagcgcctgt 120tccccgggca gacccaggtt caggtcctgg ccgcaagtca ccatggctca gcaggctgca 180gacaagtacc tctatgtgga taaaaacttc atcaataacc cgctggccca agctgactgg 240gctgccaaga agttggtatg ggtgccttcc agcaagaatg gctttgaacc agctagcctc 300aaggaggagg tgggagaaga ggccattgta gagctggtag agaatgggaa gaaggtgaag 360gtgaacaagg acgacatcca gaagatgaac ccacccaagt tctccaaggt ggaggacatg 420gcagagctca cgtgcctcaa cgaagcttcg gtgctgcaca acctcaagga gcgatactac 480tcagggctta tctacaccta ttcaggcctg ttctgtgtgg tcatcaaccc ttataagaac 540ctgcccatct actcagagga gatcgtggag atgtacaagg gcaagaagag gcacgagatg 600ccaccccaca tctacgccat cacagatact gcctaccgga gcatgatgca ggaccgggaa 660gatcagtcca tcctgtgcac gggggagtct ggagcaggga agacagagaa caccaagaaa 720gtcatccagt acctggcaca tgtggcctcc tcacacaaga gcaagaagga ccagggggag 780ttggagcggc agctgctaca ggccaaccct atcctagagg cctttggaaa cgccaagacg 840gtgaagaatg acaactcctc tcgattcggt aaattcattc gtatcaactt tgatgtcaat 900ggctacattg ttggtgccaa cattgagact tatcttctgg agaaatctcg tgctatccgc 960caagccaaag aggagcggac cttccacatc ttctactacc tgctgtctgg ggccggagaa 1020cacctgaaga ctgatctcct gttggagcca tacaacaaat accgcttcct gtccaacggg 1080cacgtcacca tccctgggca gcaggacaag gacatgttcc aggagacaat ggaggccatg 1140agaattatgg gtatcccaga ggatgagcag atgggcttgc tgcgggtcat ctctggggtc 1200cttcagcttg gcaacattgc cttcaagaag gagcggaaca ctgaccaggc gtccatgccg 1260gacaacacag ctgctcaaaa ggtgtcccac ctcctgggga tcaatgtgac cgacttcacc 1320agaggcatcc tcaccccacg catcaaggtg ggcagagact atgtgcagaa ggcgcagact 1380aaagagcagg ctgactttgc cattgaggcc ttggccaagg ctacctatga gcggatgttc 1440cgctggctgg tgcttcgcat caacaaagct ctggacaaga ccaagaggca gggcgcctca 1500tttatcggga tcctggacat cgctggcttt gagatctttg atctgaactc cttcgagcag 1560ctgtgcatca actacaccaa cgagaagctg cagcagctgt tcaaccacac catgttcatc 1620ctggagcagg aggagtacca gcgagagggc atcgagtgga acttcatcga cttcggcctg 1680gacctgcagc cctgcatcga cctcattgag aagccggcgg gtcccccagg catcctggcc 1740ctgctagatg aggagtgctg gtttcctaag gccactgaca agagcttcgt ggagaaggtg 1800gtgcaggagc agggcaccca ccccaagttc cagaagccca agcaactgaa ggacaaggct 1860gatttctgca ttatccacta tgccggcaag gtggactata aagctgacga gtggctgatg 1920aagaacatgg accccttgaa cgacaacatc gccacgctgc ttcaccagtc ctcagacaag 1980tttgtctctg agctgtggaa ggatgtggat cggatcattg gcttggacca agtggctgga 2040atgtccgaga cagcactacc tggtgccttc aagacccgga agggcatgtt ccgtactgtc 2100ggacagctgt acaaggagca gctggccaag ctcatggcca cgttgaggaa taccaacccc 2160aacttcgtgc gctgcatcat tcccaaccat gagaagaagg ccggcaaact ggacccgcac 2220ttggtgctgg accagctgcg ctgcaatggc gtccttgagg gcatccggat ctgccgccag 2280ggctttccca acagggtggt cttccaggag ttccggcaga ggtatgagat cctcaccccc 2340aactccatcc cgaagggctt catggatggc aagcaagcgt gtgtgctcat gatcaaagcc 2400ttggagcttg acagcaacct gtaccgcatc ggccagagca aagtgttctt ccgggcagga 2460gtgctagccc acctggagga agagcgggac ctgaagatca ccgatgtcat cattggcttc 2520caggcctgct gcaggggcta cctggccagg aaggcctttg ccaagaggca gcaacagctg 2580accgccatga aggtcctaca gaggaactgt gctgcgtacc tcaggctgcg caactggcag 2640tggtggaggc tcttcaccaa ggtcaagccc ctgttgaact caataagaca tgaggatgag 2700ctgttagcca aggaggcgga actgacaaag gttcgagaga aacatctggc tgcagagaac 2760aggctgacag agatggagac gatgcagtct cagctcatgg cagagaagct gcagcttcag 2820gagcagctgc aggcggagac agagctgtgt gccgaggctg aggagctccg ggcccgtctg 2880acagcgaaga agcaggagct ggaggagatc tgccatgacc tggaggccag ggtggaggag 2940gaggaggagc gctgccagta cctgcaggcc gagaagaaga agatgcagca gaacatccag 3000gaacttgagg agcagttgga ggaggaggag agcgcccggc agaagctgca gcttgagaag 3060gtgaccaccg aggccaagct gaagaaactg gaggaggacc agatcatcat ggaggaccag 3120aactgcaaac tggccaagga gaagaaactg ctggaagaca gagtagctga attcactacc 3180aacctcatgg aagaggagga gaagtccaag agcctggcca agctcaagaa caagcacgag 3240gcaatgatca ccgacctgga agagcgcctc cgtagggagg agaagcagag gcaggagttg 3300gagaagaccc gtcgcaagct ggagggagac tccacagacc tcagtgacca gattgctgag 3360ctccaggcgc agatagcaga gctcaagatg cagctggcca agaaggagga ggagttgcag 3420gctgccttgg ccagagtgga agaagaagct gctcagaaga atatggccct gaagaagatc 3480cgagaactgg aaactcagat ctctgagctc caggaggacc tggagtcgga gcgagcctcc 3540aggaataaag ccgagaagca gaaacgggat ctgggagagg agctggaggc gctgaagaca 3600gagctggagg acacgctgga ctccacggct gcccagcagg agctgaggtc gaagcgtgag 3660caggaggtga gcatcctgaa gaagactctg gaggacgagg ccaagaccca tgaggcccag 3720atccaggaga tgaggcagaa gcactcacag gctgtggagg agctggcaga tcagttggag 3780cagacgaagc gggtaaaagc tacccttgag aaggcgaagc agaccctgga gaatgagcgg 3840ggagagctgg ccaatgaggt gaaggccctg ctgcaaggca agggcgactc agagcacaag 3900cgcaagaagg tggaggcgca gctgcaagaa ctgcaggtca agttcagcga gggagagcgc 3960gtgcgaaccg aactggccga caaggtcacc aagctgcagg ttgaactgga cagtgtgacc 4020ggtctcctta gccagtctga cagcaagtcc agcaagctta cgaaggactt ctctgcgctg 4080gagtcccagc ttcaggacac acaggagttg ctccaggagg agaaccggca gaagctgagc 4140ctgagcacca agctcaagca gatggaggat gagaaaaact ccttcaggga gcagctggag 4200gaggaggagg aggccaagcg caacttggag aagcagatcg ccacgctcca tgcccaggtg 4260accgacatga agaagaagat ggaggacggt gtagggtgcc tggagactgc agaggaggcg 4320aagcggaggc ttcagaagga cttggaaggc ctgagccagc ggcttgagga gaaggtggct 4380gcctacgata agctggagaa gaccaagaca cggctgcagc aggagctgga cgacctgctg 4440gttgacctgg accaccagcg gcagagcgtc tccaacctgg aaaagaagca gaagaagttc 4500gaccagctcc tagccgagga gaagaccatc tcggccaagt atgcagagga gcgtgaccga 4560gctgaggctg aggcccgtga gaaggagaca aaggcgctat cactggcccg ggcgcttgag 4620gaggccatgg agcagaaggc

agagctggag cggctcaaca agcagttccg cacggagatg 4680gaggacctca tgagctccaa ggatgacgtg ggcaagagtg tccacgagct ggagaagtcc 4740aagcgggcct tggagcagca ggtggaggag atgaagaccc agctggagga gctggaggat 4800gagctgcagg ccacggagga tgccaagctc cgcctggagg tgaacctgca ggccatgaag 4860gcccagtttg agcgggatct gcagggccgg gatgaacaga gcgaggagaa gaagaagcag 4920ctggtcagac aggtgcggga gatggaggcg gagctggagg atgagaggaa gcagcgctcc 4980atggccatgg ccgcacgcaa gaaactggag atggatctga aggacctgga ggcacacatt 5040gacacagcca ataagaaccg ggaagaggcc atcaaacagc tgcggaagct tcaggcccag 5100atgaaggact gcatgcggga gctggacgac acgcgcgcct cccgggagga gatcctggcg 5160caggccaagg agaatgagaa gaagctgaag agcatggagg ccgagatgat tcagctgcag 5220gaggaactgg cagctgctga gcgtgctaag cgtcaggccc aacaggaacg ggacgagctg 5280gctgatgaga tcgccaacag cagtggcaaa ggggccctag cattagagga gaagcggcga 5340ctggaggccc gcattgccct gctggaggag gagctggagg aggaacaggg caacacggag 5400ctgatcaacg atcggctgaa gaaggccaac ctgcagatcg accaaataaa caccgacctg 5460aacctggaac gcagccacgc acagaagaat gagaatgcgc gacagcagct ggaacgccag 5520aacaaggagc tcaaggccaa gctgcaggaa atggagagtg ctgtcaagtc caaatacaag 5580gcctccatcg cggccttgga ggccaaaatt gcacagctgg aggaacagct ggacaacgag 5640accaaggagc gccaggcagc ctccaagcag gtgcgccgga cggagaagaa gctgaaggac 5700gtgctgctgc aggtggagga cgagcggagg aacgcggaac agttcaagga ccaggctgac 5760aaggcgtcca cccgcctgaa gcagcttaaa cggcagctag aggaggctga agaggaggcc 5820cagcgggcca atgcctcacg ccggaagctg cagcgtgagc tggaagatgc cacagagacc 5880gctgatgcta tgaaccgcga ggtcagctcc ctgaagaaca aactgaggcg tggggacctg 5940ccatttgtcg tgactcgccg aattgttcgg aaaggcactg gcgactgctc agacgaggag 6000gtcgacggta aagcagatgg ggccgatgcc aaggcagctg aataggagct tctcctgcag 6060cccaggcgga tggacaaacg gctctgcctc cctcccccaa ccctccacac ccctgccttg 6120agactgctct gaccatgtcc ccctcctccc aaggccttcc cgagggcatt ggcttcctct 6180gctgcagccc ttccagtcct ccataccctt tgagaatctg ataccaaaga gtccaggctg 6240gctcaggccg gatgacccac agggtcttgt cctccttgcc tgaaagcacg ggtggtgggc 6300aagaagggcg gccattggag taggcacaag agttttctat gaatctattt tgtcttcaga 6360taaagatttt gatagctcag gcctctagta gtgttaccct ccccgacctc ggctgtcccc 6420gtcccccgtc ccccctgctg ttggcaatca cacacggtaa cctcatacct gccctatggc 6480ccccttccct gggccctatt ggtccagaag gagcctctgt ctgggtgcag aacatggggc 6540actctgggaa tccccccact cccttctggg cagcactggt gcctctgctc ctccgactgt 6600aaaccgtctc aagtgcaatg cccctcccct cccttgccaa ggacagaccg tcctggcacc 6660ggggcaaacc agacagggca tcagggccac tctagaaagg ccaacagcct tccggtggct 6720tctcccagca ctctagggga ccaaatatat ttaatggtta agggacttgc agggcctggc 6780agccagaata tccaagggct ggagcccact gtgcgctctg gtgcctctcc taggactggg 6840gccaagggtg gtcgagctgt gccacccact ctatagcttc aagtctgcct tccacaagga 6900tgcttttgaa agaaaaaaaa aggttttatt tttcccttct tgtagtaagt gctctagttc 6960tgggtgtctt cactgccttg ccctggaact gtgtttagaa gagagtagct tgccctacaa 7020tgtctacact ggtcgctgag ttccctgcgc actgcacctc actgtttgta aatgctgtga 7080ttaggttccc ttatggcagg aaggcttttt ttttcttttt ttttttcttt tctttttttt 7140ttttttaaag gaaaaccagt caaatcatga agccacatac gctagagaag ctgaatccag 7200gtcccaaagg cgctgtcata aaggagcaag tgggacccgc accccttttt ttatataata 7260caagtgcctt agcatgtgtc gcagctgtca ccactacagt aagctggttt acagatgttt 7320ccactgagcg tcacaataaa gagtaccatg tccta 7355481960PRTMus musculus 48Met Ala Gln Gln Ala Ala Asp Lys Tyr Leu Tyr Val Asp Lys Asn Phe 1 5 10 15 Ile Asn Asn Pro Leu Ala Gln Ala Asp Trp Ala Ala Lys Lys Leu Val 20 25 30 Trp Val Pro Ser Ser Lys Asn Gly Phe Glu Pro Ala Ser Leu Lys Glu 35 40 45 Glu Val Gly Glu Glu Ala Ile Val Glu Leu Val Glu Asn Gly Lys Lys 50 55 60 Val Lys Val Asn Lys Asp Asp Ile Gln Lys Met Asn Pro Pro Lys Phe 65 70 75 80 Ser Lys Val Glu Asp Met Ala Glu Leu Thr Cys Leu Asn Glu Ala Ser 85 90 95 Val Leu His Asn Leu Lys Glu Arg Tyr Tyr Ser Gly Leu Ile Tyr Thr 100 105 110 Tyr Ser Gly Leu Phe Cys Val Val Ile Asn Pro Tyr Lys Asn Leu Pro 115 120 125 Ile Tyr Ser Glu Glu Ile Val Glu Met Tyr Lys Gly Lys Lys Arg His 130 135 140 Glu Met Pro Pro His Ile Tyr Ala Ile Thr Asp Thr Ala Tyr Arg Ser 145 150 155 160 Met Met Gln Asp Arg Glu Asp Gln Ser Ile Leu Cys Thr Gly Glu Ser 165 170 175 Gly Ala Gly Lys Thr Glu Asn Thr Lys Lys Val Ile Gln Tyr Leu Ala 180 185 190 His Val Ala Ser Ser His Lys Ser Lys Lys Asp Gln Gly Glu Leu Glu 195 200 205 Arg Gln Leu Leu Gln Ala Asn Pro Ile Leu Glu Ala Phe Gly Asn Ala 210 215 220 Lys Thr Val Lys Asn Asp Asn Ser Ser Arg Phe Gly Lys Phe Ile Arg 225 230 235 240 Ile Asn Phe Asp Val Asn Gly Tyr Ile Val Gly Ala Asn Ile Glu Thr 245 250 255 Tyr Leu Leu Glu Lys Ser Arg Ala Ile Arg Gln Ala Lys Glu Glu Arg 260 265 270 Thr Phe His Ile Phe Tyr Tyr Leu Leu Ser Gly Ala Gly Glu His Leu 275 280 285 Lys Thr Asp Leu Leu Leu Glu Pro Tyr Asn Lys Tyr Arg Phe Leu Ser 290 295 300 Asn Gly His Val Thr Ile Pro Gly Gln Gln Asp Lys Asp Met Phe Gln 305 310 315 320 Glu Thr Met Glu Ala Met Arg Ile Met Gly Ile Pro Glu Asp Glu Gln 325 330 335 Met Gly Leu Leu Arg Val Ile Ser Gly Val Leu Gln Leu Gly Asn Ile 340 345 350 Ala Phe Lys Lys Glu Arg Asn Thr Asp Gln Ala Ser Met Pro Asp Asn 355 360 365 Thr Ala Ala Gln Lys Val Ser His Leu Leu Gly Ile Asn Val Thr Asp 370 375 380 Phe Thr Arg Gly Ile Leu Thr Pro Arg Ile Lys Val Gly Arg Asp Tyr 385 390 395 400 Val Gln Lys Ala Gln Thr Lys Glu Gln Ala Asp Phe Ala Ile Glu Ala 405 410 415 Leu Ala Lys Ala Thr Tyr Glu Arg Met Phe Arg Trp Leu Val Leu Arg 420 425 430 Ile Asn Lys Ala Leu Asp Lys Thr Lys Arg Gln Gly Ala Ser Phe Ile 435 440 445 Gly Ile Leu Asp Ile Ala Gly Phe Glu Ile Phe Asp Leu Asn Ser Phe 450 455 460 Glu Gln Leu Cys Ile Asn Tyr Thr Asn Glu Lys Leu Gln Gln Leu Phe 465 470 475 480 Asn His Thr Met Phe Ile Leu Glu Gln Glu Glu Tyr Gln Arg Glu Gly 485 490 495 Ile Glu Trp Asn Phe Ile Asp Phe Gly Leu Asp Leu Gln Pro Cys Ile 500 505 510 Asp Leu Ile Glu Lys Pro Ala Gly Pro Pro Gly Ile Leu Ala Leu Leu 515 520 525 Asp Glu Glu Cys Trp Phe Pro Lys Ala Thr Asp Lys Ser Phe Val Glu 530 535 540 Lys Val Val Gln Glu Gln Gly Thr His Pro Lys Phe Gln Lys Pro Lys 545 550 555 560 Gln Leu Lys Asp Lys Ala Asp Phe Cys Ile Ile His Tyr Ala Gly Lys 565 570 575 Val Asp Tyr Lys Ala Asp Glu Trp Leu Met Lys Asn Met Asp Pro Leu 580 585 590 Asn Asp Asn Ile Ala Thr Leu Leu His Gln Ser Ser Asp Lys Phe Val 595 600 605 Ser Glu Leu Trp Lys Asp Val Asp Arg Ile Ile Gly Leu Asp Gln Val 610 615 620 Ala Gly Met Ser Glu Thr Ala Leu Pro Gly Ala Phe Lys Thr Arg Lys 625 630 635 640 Gly Met Phe Arg Thr Val Gly Gln Leu Tyr Lys Glu Gln Leu Ala Lys 645 650 655 Leu Met Ala Thr Leu Arg Asn Thr Asn Pro Asn Phe Val Arg Cys Ile 660 665 670 Ile Pro Asn His Glu Lys Lys Ala Gly Lys Leu Asp Pro His Leu Val 675 680 685 Leu Asp Gln Leu Arg Cys Asn Gly Val Leu Glu Gly Ile Arg Ile Cys 690 695 700 Arg Gln Gly Phe Pro Asn Arg Val Val Phe Gln Glu Phe Arg Gln Arg 705 710 715 720 Tyr Glu Ile Leu Thr Pro Asn Ser Ile Pro Lys Gly Phe Met Asp Gly 725 730 735 Lys Gln Ala Cys Val Leu Met Ile Lys Ala Leu Glu Leu Asp Ser Asn 740 745 750 Leu Tyr Arg Ile Gly Gln Ser Lys Val Phe Phe Arg Ala Gly Val Leu 755 760 765 Ala His Leu Glu Glu Glu Arg Asp Leu Lys Ile Thr Asp Val Ile Ile 770 775 780 Gly Phe Gln Ala Cys Cys Arg Gly Tyr Leu Ala Arg Lys Ala Phe Ala 785 790 795 800 Lys Arg Gln Gln Gln Leu Thr Ala Met Lys Val Leu Gln Arg Asn Cys 805 810 815 Ala Ala Tyr Leu Arg Leu Arg Asn Trp Gln Trp Trp Arg Leu Phe Thr 820 825 830 Lys Val Lys Pro Leu Leu Asn Ser Ile Arg His Glu Asp Glu Leu Leu 835 840 845 Ala Lys Glu Ala Glu Leu Thr Lys Val Arg Glu Lys His Leu Ala Ala 850 855 860 Glu Asn Arg Leu Thr Glu Met Glu Thr Met Gln Ser Gln Leu Met Ala 865 870 875 880 Glu Lys Leu Gln Leu Gln Glu Gln Leu Gln Ala Glu Thr Glu Leu Cys 885 890 895 Ala Glu Ala Glu Glu Leu Arg Ala Arg Leu Thr Ala Lys Lys Gln Glu 900 905 910 Leu Glu Glu Ile Cys His Asp Leu Glu Ala Arg Val Glu Glu Glu Glu 915 920 925 Glu Arg Cys Gln Tyr Leu Gln Ala Glu Lys Lys Lys Met Gln Gln Asn 930 935 940 Ile Gln Glu Leu Glu Glu Gln Leu Glu Glu Glu Glu Ser Ala Arg Gln 945 950 955 960 Lys Leu Gln Leu Glu Lys Val Thr Thr Glu Ala Lys Leu Lys Lys Leu 965 970 975 Glu Glu Asp Gln Ile Ile Met Glu Asp Gln Asn Cys Lys Leu Ala Lys 980 985 990 Glu Lys Lys Leu Leu Glu Asp Arg Val Ala Glu Phe Thr Thr Asn Leu 995 1000 1005 Met Glu Glu Glu Glu Lys Ser Lys Ser Leu Ala Lys Leu Lys Asn 1010 1015 1020 Lys His Glu Ala Met Ile Thr Asp Leu Glu Glu Arg Leu Arg Arg 1025 1030 1035 Glu Glu Lys Gln Arg Gln Glu Leu Glu Lys Thr Arg Arg Lys Leu 1040 1045 1050 Glu Gly Asp Ser Thr Asp Leu Ser Asp Gln Ile Ala Glu Leu Gln 1055 1060 1065 Ala Gln Ile Ala Glu Leu Lys Met Gln Leu Ala Lys Lys Glu Glu 1070 1075 1080 Glu Leu Gln Ala Ala Leu Ala Arg Val Glu Glu Glu Ala Ala Gln 1085 1090 1095 Lys Asn Met Ala Leu Lys Lys Ile Arg Glu Leu Glu Thr Gln Ile 1100 1105 1110 Ser Glu Leu Gln Glu Asp Leu Glu Ser Glu Arg Ala Ser Arg Asn 1115 1120 1125 Lys Ala Glu Lys Gln Lys Arg Asp Leu Gly Glu Glu Leu Glu Ala 1130 1135 1140 Leu Lys Thr Glu Leu Glu Asp Thr Leu Asp Ser Thr Ala Ala Gln 1145 1150 1155 Gln Glu Leu Arg Ser Lys Arg Glu Gln Glu Val Ser Ile Leu Lys 1160 1165 1170 Lys Thr Leu Glu Asp Glu Ala Lys Thr His Glu Ala Gln Ile Gln 1175 1180 1185 Glu Met Arg Gln Lys His Ser Gln Ala Val Glu Glu Leu Ala Asp 1190 1195 1200 Gln Leu Glu Gln Thr Lys Arg Val Lys Ala Thr Leu Glu Lys Ala 1205 1210 1215 Lys Gln Thr Leu Glu Asn Glu Arg Gly Glu Leu Ala Asn Glu Val 1220 1225 1230 Lys Ala Leu Leu Gln Gly Lys Gly Asp Ser Glu His Lys Arg Lys 1235 1240 1245 Lys Val Glu Ala Gln Leu Gln Glu Leu Gln Val Lys Phe Ser Glu 1250 1255 1260 Gly Glu Arg Val Arg Thr Glu Leu Ala Asp Lys Val Thr Lys Leu 1265 1270 1275 Gln Val Glu Leu Asp Ser Val Thr Gly Leu Leu Ser Gln Ser Asp 1280 1285 1290 Ser Lys Ser Ser Lys Leu Thr Lys Asp Phe Ser Ala Leu Glu Ser 1295 1300 1305 Gln Leu Gln Asp Thr Gln Glu Leu Leu Gln Glu Glu Asn Arg Gln 1310 1315 1320 Lys Leu Ser Leu Ser Thr Lys Leu Lys Gln Met Glu Asp Glu Lys 1325 1330 1335 Asn Ser Phe Arg Glu Gln Leu Glu Glu Glu Glu Glu Ala Lys Arg 1340 1345 1350 Asn Leu Glu Lys Gln Ile Ala Thr Leu His Ala Gln Val Thr Asp 1355 1360 1365 Met Lys Lys Lys Met Glu Asp Gly Val Gly Cys Leu Glu Thr Ala 1370 1375 1380 Glu Glu Ala Lys Arg Arg Leu Gln Lys Asp Leu Glu Gly Leu Ser 1385 1390 1395 Gln Arg Leu Glu Glu Lys Val Ala Ala Tyr Asp Lys Leu Glu Lys 1400 1405 1410 Thr Lys Thr Arg Leu Gln Gln Glu Leu Asp Asp Leu Leu Val Asp 1415 1420 1425 Leu Asp His Gln Arg Gln Ser Val Ser Asn Leu Glu Lys Lys Gln 1430 1435 1440 Lys Lys Phe Asp Gln Leu Leu Ala Glu Glu Lys Thr Ile Ser Ala 1445 1450 1455 Lys Tyr Ala Glu Glu Arg Asp Arg Ala Glu Ala Glu Ala Arg Glu 1460 1465 1470 Lys Glu Thr Lys Ala Leu Ser Leu Ala Arg Ala Leu Glu Glu Ala 1475 1480 1485 Met Glu Gln Lys Ala Glu Leu Glu Arg Leu Asn Lys Gln Phe Arg 1490 1495 1500 Thr Glu Met Glu Asp Leu Met Ser Ser Lys Asp Asp Val Gly Lys 1505 1510 1515 Ser Val His Glu Leu Glu Lys Ser Lys Arg Ala Leu Glu Gln Gln 1520 1525 1530 Val Glu Glu Met Lys Thr Gln Leu Glu Glu Leu Glu Asp Glu Leu 1535 1540 1545 Gln Ala Thr Glu Asp Ala Lys Leu Arg Leu Glu Val Asn Leu Gln 1550 1555 1560 Ala Met Lys Ala Gln Phe Glu Arg Asp Leu Gln Gly Arg Asp Glu 1565 1570 1575 Gln Ser Glu Glu Lys Lys Lys Gln Leu Val Arg Gln Val Arg Glu 1580 1585 1590 Met Glu Ala Glu Leu Glu Asp Glu Arg Lys Gln Arg Ser Met Ala 1595 1600 1605 Met Ala Ala Arg Lys Lys Leu Glu Met Asp Leu Lys Asp Leu Glu 1610 1615 1620 Ala His Ile Asp Thr Ala Asn Lys Asn Arg Glu Glu Ala Ile Lys 1625 1630 1635 Gln Leu Arg Lys Leu Gln Ala Gln Met Lys Asp Cys Met Arg Glu 1640 1645 1650 Leu Asp Asp Thr Arg Ala Ser Arg Glu Glu Ile Leu Ala Gln Ala 1655 1660 1665 Lys Glu Asn Glu Lys Lys Leu Lys Ser Met Glu Ala Glu Met Ile 1670 1675 1680 Gln Leu Gln Glu Glu Leu Ala Ala Ala Glu Arg Ala Lys Arg Gln 1685 1690 1695 Ala Gln Gln Glu Arg Asp Glu Leu Ala Asp Glu Ile Ala Asn Ser 1700 1705 1710 Ser Gly Lys Gly Ala Leu Ala Leu Glu Glu Lys Arg Arg Leu Glu 1715 1720 1725 Ala Arg Ile Ala Leu Leu Glu Glu Glu Leu Glu Glu Glu Gln Gly 1730 1735 1740 Asn Thr Glu Leu Ile Asn Asp Arg Leu Lys Lys Ala Asn Leu Gln 1745 1750 1755 Ile Asp Gln Ile Asn Thr Asp Leu Asn Leu Glu Arg Ser His Ala 1760 1765 1770 Gln Lys Asn Glu Asn Ala Arg Gln Gln Leu Glu Arg Gln Asn Lys 1775 1780 1785 Glu Leu Lys Ala Lys Leu Gln Glu Met Glu Ser Ala Val Lys Ser 1790 1795 1800 Lys Tyr Lys Ala Ser Ile Ala Ala Leu Glu Ala Lys Ile Ala Gln 1805 1810 1815 Leu Glu Glu Gln Leu Asp Asn Glu Thr Lys Glu Arg Gln Ala Ala 1820 1825 1830 Ser Lys Gln Val Arg Arg Thr Glu Lys Lys Leu Lys Asp Val Leu 1835

1840 1845 Leu Gln Val Glu Asp Glu Arg Arg Asn Ala Glu Gln Phe Lys Asp 1850 1855 1860 Gln Ala Asp Lys Ala Ser Thr Arg Leu Lys Gln Leu Lys Arg Gln 1865 1870 1875 Leu Glu Glu Ala Glu Glu Glu Ala Gln Arg Ala Asn Ala Ser Arg 1880 1885 1890 Arg Lys Leu Gln Arg Glu Leu Glu Asp Ala Thr Glu Thr Ala Asp 1895 1900 1905 Ala Met Asn Arg Glu Val Ser Ser Leu Lys Asn Lys Leu Arg Arg 1910 1915 1920 Gly Asp Leu Pro Phe Val Val Thr Arg Arg Ile Val Arg Lys Gly 1925 1930 1935 Thr Gly Asp Cys Ser Asp Glu Glu Val Asp Gly Lys Ala Asp Gly 1940 1945 1950 Ala Asp Ala Lys Ala Ala Glu 1955 1960 497474DNAHomo sapiens 49atacgactca ctatagggcg atcaggtgct ggaaagaagg ctaagcaagg ctgacctgct 60gcagctcccg cctcgtgcgc tcgccccacc cggccgccgc ccgagcgctc gagaaagtcc 120tctcgggaga agcagcgcct gttcccgggg cagatccagg ttcaggtcct ggctataagt 180caccatggca cagcaagctg ccgataagta tctctatgtg gataaaaact tcatcaacaa 240tccgctggcc caggccgact gggctgccaa gaagctggta tgggtgcctt ccgacaagag 300tggctttgag ccagccagcc tcaaggagga ggtgggcgaa gaggccatcg tggagctggt 360ggagaatggg aagaaggtga aggtgaacaa ggatgacatc cagaagatga acccgcccaa 420gttctccaag gtggaggaca tggcagagct cacgtgcctc aacgaagcct cggtgctgca 480caacctcaag gagcgttact actcagggct catctacacc tattcaggcc tgttctgtgt 540ggtcatcaat ccttacaaga acctgcccat ctactctgaa gagattgtgg aaatgtacaa 600gggcaagaag aggcacgaga tgccccctca catctatgcc atcacagaca ccgcctacag 660gagtatgatg caagaccgag aagatcaatc catcttgtgc actggtgaat ctggagctgg 720caagacggag aacaccaaga aggtcatcca gtatctggcg tacgtggcgt cctcgcacaa 780gagcaagaag gaccagggcg agctggagcg gcagctgctg caggccaacc ccatcctgga 840ggccttcggg aacgccaaga ccgtgaagaa tgacaactcc tcccgcttcg gcaaattcat 900tcgcatcaac tttgatgtca atggctacat tgttggagcc aacattgaga cttatctttt 960ggagaaatct cgtgctatcc gccaagccaa ggaagaacgg accttccaca tcttctatta 1020tctcctgtct ggggctggag agcacctgaa gaccgatctc ctgttggagc cgtacaacaa 1080ataccgcttc ctgtccaatg gacacgtcac catccccggg cagcaggaca aggacatgtt 1140ccaggagacc atggaggcca tgaggattat gggcatccca gaagaggagc aaatgggcct 1200gctgcgggtc atctcagggg ttcttcagct cggcaacatc gtcttcaaga aggagcggaa 1260cactgaccag gcgtccatgc ccgacaacac agctgcccaa aaggtgtccc atctcttggg 1320tatcaatgtg accgatttca ccagaggaat cctcaccccg cgcatcaagg tgggacggga 1380ttacgtccag aaggcgcaga ctaaagagca ggctgacttt gccatcgagg ccttggccaa 1440ggcgacctat gagcggatgt tccgctggct ggtgctgcgc atcaacaagg ctctggacaa 1500gaccaagagg cagggcgcct ccttcatcgg gatcctggac attgccggct tcgagatctt 1560tgatctgaac tcgtttgagc agctgtgcat caattacacc aatgagaagc tgcagcagct 1620cttcaaccac accatgttca tcctggagca ggaggagtac cagcgcgagg gcatcgagtg 1680gaacttcatc gactttggcc tcgacctgca gccctgcatc gacctcattg agaagccagc 1740aggccccccg ggcattctgg ccctgctgga cgaggagtgc tggttcccca aagccaccga 1800caagagcttc gtggagaagg tgatgcagga gcagggcacc caccccaagt tccagaagcc 1860caagcagctg aaggacaaag ctgatttctg cattatccac tatgccggca aggtggatta 1920caaagctgac gagtggctga tgaagaacat ggatcccctg aatgacaaca tcgccacact 1980gctccaccag tcctctgaca agtttgtctc ggagctgtgg aaggatgtgg accgcatcat 2040cggcctggac caggtggccg gcatgtcgga gaccgcactg cccggggcct tcaagacgcg 2100gaagggcatg ttccgcactg tggggcagct ttacaaggag cagctggcca agctgatggc 2160tacgctgagg aacacgaacc ccaactttgt ccgctgcatc atccccaacc acgagaagaa 2220ggccggcaag ctggacccgc atctcgtgct ggaccagctg cgctgcaacg gtgttctcga 2280gggcatccgt atctgccgcc agggcttccc caacagggtg gtcttccagg agtttcggca 2340gagatatgag atcctgactc caaactccat tcccaagggt ttcatggacg ggaagcaggc 2400gtgcgtgctc atgataaaag ccctggagct cgacagcaat ctgtaccgca ttggccagag 2460caaagtcttc ttccgtgccg gtgtgctggc ccacctggag gaggagcgag acctgaagat 2520caccgacgtc atcatagggt tccaggcctg ctgcaggggc tacctggcca ggaaagcatt 2580tgccaagcgg cagcagcagc ttaccgccat gaaggtcctc cagcggaact gcgctgccta 2640cctgaagctg cggaactggc agtggtggcg gctcttcacc aaggtcaagc cgctgctgca 2700ggtgagccgg caggaggagg agatgatggc caaggaggag gagctggtga aggtcagaga 2760gaagcagctg gctgcggaga acaggctcac ggagatggag acgctgcagt ctcagctcat 2820ggcagagaaa ttgcagctgc aggagcagct ccaggcagaa accgagctgt gtgccgaggc 2880tgaggagctc cgggcccgcc tgaccgccaa gaagcaggaa ttagaagaga tctgccatga 2940cctagaggcc agggtggagg aggaggagga gcgctgccag cacctgcagg cggagaagaa 3000gaagatgcag cagaacatcc aggagcttga ggagcagctg gaggaggagg agagcgcccg 3060gcagaagctg cagctggaga aggtgaccac cgaggcgaag ctgaaaaagc tggaggagga 3120gcagatcatc ctggaggacc agaactgcaa gctggccaag gaaaagaaac tgctggaaga 3180cagaatagct gagttcacca ccaacctcac agaagaggag gagaaatcta agagcctcgc 3240caagctcaag aacaagcatg aggcaatgat cactgacttg gaagagcgcc tccgcaggga 3300ggagaagcag cgacaggagc tggagaagac ccgccggaag ctggagggag actccacaga 3360cctcagcgac cagatcgccg agctccaggc ccagatcgcg gagctcaaga tgcagctggc 3420caagaaagag gaggagctcc aggccgccct ggccagagtg gaagaggaag ctgcccagaa 3480gaacatggcc ctcaagaaga tccgggagct ggaatctcag atctctgaac tccaggaaga 3540cctggagtct gagcgtgctt ccaggaataa agctgagaag cagaaacggg accttgggga 3600agagctagag gcgctgaaaa cagagttgga ggacacgctg gattccacag ctgcccagca 3660ggagctcagg tcaaaacgtg agcaggaggt gaacatcctg aagaagaccc tggaggagga 3720ggccaagacc cacgaggccc agatccagga gatgaggcag aagcactcac aggccgtgga 3780ggagctggcg gagcagctgg agcagacgaa gcgggtgaaa gcaaacctcg agaaggcaaa 3840gcagactctg gagaacgagc ggggggagct ggccaacgag gtgaaggtgc tgctgcaggg 3900caaaggggac tcggagcaca agcgcaagaa agtggaggcg cagctgcagg agctgcaggt 3960caagttcaac gagggagagc gcgtgcgcac agagctggcc gacaaggtca ccaagctgca 4020ggtggagctg gacaacgtga ccgggcttct cagccagtcc gacagcaagt ccagcaagct 4080caccaaggac ttctccgcgc tggagtccca gctgcaggac actcaggagc tgctgcagga 4140ggagaaccgg cagaagctga gcctgagcac caagctcaag caggtggagg acgagaagaa 4200ttccttccgg gagcagctgg aggaggagga ggaggccaag cacaacctgg agaagcagat 4260cgccaccctc catgcccagg tggccgacat gaaaaagaag atggaggaca gtgtggggtg 4320cctggaaact gctgaggagg tgaagaggaa gctccagaag gacctggagg gcctgagcca 4380gcggcacgag gagaaggtgg ccgcctacga caagctggag aagaccaaga cgcggctgca 4440gcaggagctg gacgacctgc tggtggacct ggaccaccag cgccagagcg cgtgcaacct 4500ggagaagaag cagaagaagt ttgaccagct cctggcggag gagaagacca tctctgccaa 4560gtatgcagag gagcgcgacc gggctgaggc ggaggcccga gagaaggaga ccaaggctct 4620gtcgctggcc cgggccctgg aggaagccat ggagcagaag gcggagctgg agcggctcaa 4680caagcagttc cgcacggaga tggaggacct tatgagctcc aaggatgatg tgggcaagag 4740tgtccacgag ctggagaagt ccaagcgggc cctagagcag caggtggagg agatgaagac 4800gcagctggaa gagctggagg acgagctgca ggccaccgaa gatgccaagc tgcggttgga 4860ggtcaacctg caggccatga aggcccagtt cgagcgggac ctgcagggcc gggacgagca 4920gagcgaggag aagaagaagc agctggtcag acaggtgcgg gagatggagg cagagctgga 4980ggacgagagg aagcagcgct cgatggcagt ggccgcccgg aagaagctgg agatggacct 5040gaaggacctg gaggcgcaca tcgactcggc caacaagaac cgggacgaag ccatcaaaca 5100gctgcggaag ctgcaggccc agatgaagga ctgcatgcgc gagctggatg acacccgcgc 5160ctctcgtgag gagatcctgg cccaggccaa agagaacgag aagaagctga agagcatgga 5220ggccgagatg atccagttgc aggaggaact ggcagccgcg gagcgtgcca agcgccaggc 5280ccagcaggag cgggatgagc tggctgacga gatcgccaac agcagcggca aaggagccct 5340ggcgttagag gagaagcggc gtctggaggc ccgcatcgcc cagctggagg aggagctgga 5400ggaggagcag ggcaacacgg agctgatcaa cgaccggctg aagaaggcca acctgcagat 5460cgaccagatc aacaccgacc tgaacctgga gcgcagccac gcccagaaga acgagaatgc 5520tcggcagcag ctggaacgcc agaacaagga gcttaaggtc aagctgcagg agatggaggg 5580cactgtcaag tccaagtaca aggcctccat caccgccctc gaggccaaga ttgcacagct 5640ggaggagcag ctggacaacg agaccaagga gcgccaggca gcctgcaaac aggtgcgtcg 5700gaccgagaag aagctgaagg atgtgctgct gcaggtggat gacgagcgga ggaacgccga 5760gcagtacaag gaccaggccg acaaggcatc tacccgcctg aagcagctca agcggcagct 5820ggaggaggcc gaagaggagg cccagcgggc caacgcctcc cgccggaaac tgcagcgcga 5880gctggaggac gccactgaga cggccgatgc catgaaccgc gaagtcagct ccctaaagaa 5940caagctcagg cgcggggacc tgccgtttgt cgtgccccgc cgaatggccc ggaaaggcgc 6000cggggatggc tccgacgaag aggtagatgg caaagcggat ggggctgagg ccaaacctgc 6060cgaataagcc tcttctcctg cagcctgaga tggatggaca gacagacacc acagcctccc 6120cttcccagac cccgcagcac gcctctcccc accttcttgg gactgctgtg aacatgcctc 6180ctcctgccct ccgccccgtc cccccatccc gtttccctcc aggtgttgtt gagggcattt 6240ggcttcctct gctgcatccc cttccagctc cctcccctgc tcagaatctg ataccaaaga 6300gacagggccc gggcccaggc agagagcgac cagcaggctc ctcagccctc tcttgccaaa 6360aagcacaaga tgttgaggcg agcagggcag gcccccgggg aggggccaga gttttctatg 6420aatctatttt tcttcagact gaggcctttt ggtagtcgga gcccccgcag tcgtcagcct 6480ccctgacgtc tgccaccagc gcccccactc ctcctccttt ctttgctgtt tgcaatcaca 6540cgtggtgacc tcacacacct ctgccccttg ggcctcccac tcccatggct ctgggcggtc 6600cagaaggagc aggccctggg cctccacctc tgtgcagggc acagaaggct ggggtggggg 6660gaggagtgga ttcctcccca ccctgtccca ggcagcgcca ctgtccgctg tctccctcct 6720gattctaaaa tgtctcaagt gcaatgcccc ctcccctcct ttaccgagga cagcctgcct 6780ctgccacagc aaggctgtcg gggtcaagct ggaaaggcca gcagccttcc agtggcttct 6840cccaacactc ttggggacca aatatattta atggttaagg gacttgtccc aagtctgaca 6900gccagagcgt tagaggggcc agcggccctc ccaggcgatc ttgtgtctac tctaggactg 6960ggcccgaggg tggtttacct gcaccgttga ctcagtatag tttaaaaatc tgccacctgc 7020acaggtattt ttgaaagcaa aataaggttt tcttttttcc cctttcttgt aataaatgat 7080aaaattccga gtctttctca ctgcctttgt ttagaagaga gtagctcgtc ctcactggtc 7140tacactggtt gccgaattta cttgtattcc taactgtttt gtatatgctg cattgagact 7200tacggcaaga aggcattttt tttttttaaa ggaaacaaac tctcaaatca tgaagtgata 7260taaaagctgc atatgcctac aaagctctga attcaggtcc cagttgctgt cacaaaggag 7320tgagtgaaac tcccacccta cccccttttt tatataataa aagtgcctta gcatgtgttg 7380cagctgtcac cactacagta agctggttta cagatgtttt ccactgagca tcacaataaa 7440gagaaccatg tgctaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaa 7474501960PRTHomo sapiens 50Met Ala Gln Gln Ala Ala Asp Lys Tyr Leu Tyr Val Asp Lys Asn Phe 1 5 10 15 Ile Asn Asn Pro Leu Ala Gln Ala Asp Trp Ala Ala Lys Lys Leu Val 20 25 30 Trp Val Pro Ser Asp Lys Ser Gly Phe Glu Pro Ala Ser Leu Lys Glu 35 40 45 Glu Val Gly Glu Glu Ala Ile Val Glu Leu Val Glu Asn Gly Lys Lys 50 55 60 Val Lys Val Asn Lys Asp Asp Ile Gln Lys Met Asn Pro Pro Lys Phe 65 70 75 80 Ser Lys Val Glu Asp Met Ala Glu Leu Thr Cys Leu Asn Glu Ala Ser 85 90 95 Val Leu His Asn Leu Lys Glu Arg Tyr Tyr Ser Gly Leu Ile Tyr Thr 100 105 110 Tyr Ser Gly Leu Phe Cys Val Val Ile Asn Pro Tyr Lys Asn Leu Pro 115 120 125 Ile Tyr Ser Glu Glu Ile Val Glu Met Tyr Lys Gly Lys Lys Arg His 130 135 140 Glu Met Pro Pro His Ile Tyr Ala Ile Thr Asp Thr Ala Tyr Arg Ser 145 150 155 160 Met Met Gln Asp Arg Glu Asp Gln Ser Ile Leu Cys Thr Gly Glu Ser 165 170 175 Gly Ala Gly Lys Thr Glu Asn Thr Lys Lys Val Ile Gln Tyr Leu Ala 180 185 190 Tyr Val Ala Ser Ser His Lys Ser Lys Lys Asp Gln Gly Glu Leu Glu 195 200 205 Arg Gln Leu Leu Gln Ala Asn Pro Ile Leu Glu Ala Phe Gly Asn Ala 210 215 220 Lys Thr Val Lys Asn Asp Asn Ser Ser Arg Phe Gly Lys Phe Ile Arg 225 230 235 240 Ile Asn Phe Asp Val Asn Gly Tyr Ile Val Gly Ala Asn Ile Glu Thr 245 250 255 Tyr Leu Leu Glu Lys Ser Arg Ala Ile Arg Gln Ala Lys Glu Glu Arg 260 265 270 Thr Phe His Ile Phe Tyr Tyr Leu Leu Ser Gly Ala Gly Glu His Leu 275 280 285 Lys Thr Asp Leu Leu Leu Glu Pro Tyr Asn Lys Tyr Arg Phe Leu Ser 290 295 300 Asn Gly His Val Thr Ile Pro Gly Gln Gln Asp Lys Asp Met Phe Gln 305 310 315 320 Glu Thr Met Glu Ala Met Arg Ile Met Gly Ile Pro Glu Glu Glu Gln 325 330 335 Met Gly Leu Leu Arg Val Ile Ser Gly Val Leu Gln Leu Gly Asn Ile 340 345 350 Val Phe Lys Lys Glu Arg Asn Thr Asp Gln Ala Ser Met Pro Asp Asn 355 360 365 Thr Ala Ala Gln Lys Val Ser His Leu Leu Gly Ile Asn Val Thr Asp 370 375 380 Phe Thr Arg Gly Ile Leu Thr Pro Arg Ile Lys Val Gly Arg Asp Tyr 385 390 395 400 Val Gln Lys Ala Gln Thr Lys Glu Gln Ala Asp Phe Ala Ile Glu Ala 405 410 415 Leu Ala Lys Ala Thr Tyr Glu Arg Met Phe Arg Trp Leu Val Leu Arg 420 425 430 Ile Asn Lys Ala Leu Asp Lys Thr Lys Arg Gln Gly Ala Ser Phe Ile 435 440 445 Gly Ile Leu Asp Ile Ala Gly Phe Glu Ile Phe Asp Leu Asn Ser Phe 450 455 460 Glu Gln Leu Cys Ile Asn Tyr Thr Asn Glu Lys Leu Gln Gln Leu Phe 465 470 475 480 Asn His Thr Met Phe Ile Leu Glu Gln Glu Glu Tyr Gln Arg Glu Gly 485 490 495 Ile Glu Trp Asn Phe Ile Asp Phe Gly Leu Asp Leu Gln Pro Cys Ile 500 505 510 Asp Leu Ile Glu Lys Pro Ala Gly Pro Pro Gly Ile Leu Ala Leu Leu 515 520 525 Asp Glu Glu Cys Trp Phe Pro Lys Ala Thr Asp Lys Ser Phe Val Glu 530 535 540 Lys Val Met Gln Glu Gln Gly Thr His Pro Lys Phe Gln Lys Pro Lys 545 550 555 560 Gln Leu Lys Asp Lys Ala Asp Phe Cys Ile Ile His Tyr Ala Gly Lys 565 570 575 Val Asp Tyr Lys Ala Asp Glu Trp Leu Met Lys Asn Met Asp Pro Leu 580 585 590 Asn Asp Asn Ile Ala Thr Leu Leu His Gln Ser Ser Asp Lys Phe Val 595 600 605 Ser Glu Leu Trp Lys Asp Val Asp Arg Ile Ile Gly Leu Asp Gln Val 610 615 620 Ala Gly Met Ser Glu Thr Ala Leu Pro Gly Ala Phe Lys Thr Arg Lys 625 630 635 640 Gly Met Phe Arg Thr Val Gly Gln Leu Tyr Lys Glu Gln Leu Ala Lys 645 650 655 Leu Met Ala Thr Leu Arg Asn Thr Asn Pro Asn Phe Val Arg Cys Ile 660 665 670 Ile Pro Asn His Glu Lys Lys Ala Gly Lys Leu Asp Pro His Leu Val 675 680 685 Leu Asp Gln Leu Arg Cys Asn Gly Val Leu Glu Gly Ile Arg Ile Cys 690 695 700 Arg Gln Gly Phe Pro Asn Arg Val Val Phe Gln Glu Phe Arg Gln Arg 705 710 715 720 Tyr Glu Ile Leu Thr Pro Asn Ser Ile Pro Lys Gly Phe Met Asp Gly 725 730 735 Lys Gln Ala Cys Val Leu Met Ile Lys Ala Leu Glu Leu Asp Ser Asn 740 745 750 Leu Tyr Arg Ile Gly Gln Ser Lys Val Phe Phe Arg Ala Gly Val Leu 755 760 765 Ala His Leu Glu Glu Glu Arg Asp Leu Lys Ile Thr Asp Val Ile Ile 770 775 780 Gly Phe Gln Ala Cys Cys Arg Gly Tyr Leu Ala Arg Lys Ala Phe Ala 785 790 795 800 Lys Arg Gln Gln Gln Leu Thr Ala Met Lys Val Leu Gln Arg Asn Cys 805 810 815 Ala Ala Tyr Leu Lys Leu Arg Asn Trp Gln Trp Trp Arg Leu Phe Thr 820 825 830 Lys Val Lys Pro Leu Leu Gln Val Ser Arg Gln Glu Glu Glu Met Met 835 840 845 Ala Lys Glu Glu Glu Leu Val Lys Val Arg Glu Lys Gln Leu Ala Ala 850 855 860 Glu Asn Arg Leu Thr Glu Met Glu Thr Leu Gln Ser Gln Leu Met Ala 865 870 875 880 Glu Lys Leu Gln Leu Gln Glu Gln Leu Gln Ala Glu Thr Glu Leu Cys 885 890 895 Ala Glu Ala Glu Glu Leu Arg Ala Arg Leu Thr Ala Lys Lys Gln Glu 900 905 910 Leu Glu Glu Ile Cys His Asp Leu Glu Ala Arg Val Glu Glu Glu Glu 915 920 925 Glu Arg Cys Gln His Leu Gln Ala Glu Lys Lys Lys Met Gln Gln Asn 930 935 940 Ile Gln Glu Leu Glu Glu Gln Leu Glu Glu Glu Glu Ser Ala Arg Gln 945 950 955 960 Lys Leu Gln Leu Glu Lys Val Thr Thr Glu Ala Lys Leu Lys Lys Leu 965 970 975 Glu Glu Glu Gln Ile Ile Leu Glu Asp Gln Asn Cys Lys Leu Ala Lys 980 985 990 Glu Lys Lys Leu Leu Glu Asp Arg Ile Ala Glu Phe Thr Thr Asn Leu 995 1000 1005 Thr Glu Glu Glu Glu Lys Ser Lys Ser Leu Ala Lys Leu Lys Asn 1010 1015 1020 Lys His Glu

Ala Met Ile Thr Asp Leu Glu Glu Arg Leu Arg Arg 1025 1030 1035 Glu Glu Lys Gln Arg Gln Glu Leu Glu Lys Thr Arg Arg Lys Leu 1040 1045 1050 Glu Gly Asp Ser Thr Asp Leu Ser Asp Gln Ile Ala Glu Leu Gln 1055 1060 1065 Ala Gln Ile Ala Glu Leu Lys Met Gln Leu Ala Lys Lys Glu Glu 1070 1075 1080 Glu Leu Gln Ala Ala Leu Ala Arg Val Glu Glu Glu Ala Ala Gln 1085 1090 1095 Lys Asn Met Ala Leu Lys Lys Ile Arg Glu Leu Glu Ser Gln Ile 1100 1105 1110 Ser Glu Leu Gln Glu Asp Leu Glu Ser Glu Arg Ala Ser Arg Asn 1115 1120 1125 Lys Ala Glu Lys Gln Lys Arg Asp Leu Gly Glu Glu Leu Glu Ala 1130 1135 1140 Leu Lys Thr Glu Leu Glu Asp Thr Leu Asp Ser Thr Ala Ala Gln 1145 1150 1155 Gln Glu Leu Arg Ser Lys Arg Glu Gln Glu Val Asn Ile Leu Lys 1160 1165 1170 Lys Thr Leu Glu Glu Glu Ala Lys Thr His Glu Ala Gln Ile Gln 1175 1180 1185 Glu Met Arg Gln Lys His Ser Gln Ala Val Glu Glu Leu Ala Glu 1190 1195 1200 Gln Leu Glu Gln Thr Lys Arg Val Lys Ala Asn Leu Glu Lys Ala 1205 1210 1215 Lys Gln Thr Leu Glu Asn Glu Arg Gly Glu Leu Ala Asn Glu Val 1220 1225 1230 Lys Val Leu Leu Gln Gly Lys Gly Asp Ser Glu His Lys Arg Lys 1235 1240 1245 Lys Val Glu Ala Gln Leu Gln Glu Leu Gln Val Lys Phe Asn Glu 1250 1255 1260 Gly Glu Arg Val Arg Thr Glu Leu Ala Asp Lys Val Thr Lys Leu 1265 1270 1275 Gln Val Glu Leu Asp Asn Val Thr Gly Leu Leu Ser Gln Ser Asp 1280 1285 1290 Ser Lys Ser Ser Lys Leu Thr Lys Asp Phe Ser Ala Leu Glu Ser 1295 1300 1305 Gln Leu Gln Asp Thr Gln Glu Leu Leu Gln Glu Glu Asn Arg Gln 1310 1315 1320 Lys Leu Ser Leu Ser Thr Lys Leu Lys Gln Val Glu Asp Glu Lys 1325 1330 1335 Asn Ser Phe Arg Glu Gln Leu Glu Glu Glu Glu Glu Ala Lys His 1340 1345 1350 Asn Leu Glu Lys Gln Ile Ala Thr Leu His Ala Gln Val Ala Asp 1355 1360 1365 Met Lys Lys Lys Met Glu Asp Ser Val Gly Cys Leu Glu Thr Ala 1370 1375 1380 Glu Glu Val Lys Arg Lys Leu Gln Lys Asp Leu Glu Gly Leu Ser 1385 1390 1395 Gln Arg His Glu Glu Lys Val Ala Ala Tyr Asp Lys Leu Glu Lys 1400 1405 1410 Thr Lys Thr Arg Leu Gln Gln Glu Leu Asp Asp Leu Leu Val Asp 1415 1420 1425 Leu Asp His Gln Arg Gln Ser Ala Cys Asn Leu Glu Lys Lys Gln 1430 1435 1440 Lys Lys Phe Asp Gln Leu Leu Ala Glu Glu Lys Thr Ile Ser Ala 1445 1450 1455 Lys Tyr Ala Glu Glu Arg Asp Arg Ala Glu Ala Glu Ala Arg Glu 1460 1465 1470 Lys Glu Thr Lys Ala Leu Ser Leu Ala Arg Ala Leu Glu Glu Ala 1475 1480 1485 Met Glu Gln Lys Ala Glu Leu Glu Arg Leu Asn Lys Gln Phe Arg 1490 1495 1500 Thr Glu Met Glu Asp Leu Met Ser Ser Lys Asp Asp Val Gly Lys 1505 1510 1515 Ser Val His Glu Leu Glu Lys Ser Lys Arg Ala Leu Glu Gln Gln 1520 1525 1530 Val Glu Glu Met Lys Thr Gln Leu Glu Glu Leu Glu Asp Glu Leu 1535 1540 1545 Gln Ala Thr Glu Asp Ala Lys Leu Arg Leu Glu Val Asn Leu Gln 1550 1555 1560 Ala Met Lys Ala Gln Phe Glu Arg Asp Leu Gln Gly Arg Asp Glu 1565 1570 1575 Gln Ser Glu Glu Lys Lys Lys Gln Leu Val Arg Gln Val Arg Glu 1580 1585 1590 Met Glu Ala Glu Leu Glu Asp Glu Arg Lys Gln Arg Ser Met Ala 1595 1600 1605 Val Ala Ala Arg Lys Lys Leu Glu Met Asp Leu Lys Asp Leu Glu 1610 1615 1620 Ala His Ile Asp Ser Ala Asn Lys Asn Arg Asp Glu Ala Ile Lys 1625 1630 1635 Gln Leu Arg Lys Leu Gln Ala Gln Met Lys Asp Cys Met Arg Glu 1640 1645 1650 Leu Asp Asp Thr Arg Ala Ser Arg Glu Glu Ile Leu Ala Gln Ala 1655 1660 1665 Lys Glu Asn Glu Lys Lys Leu Lys Ser Met Glu Ala Glu Met Ile 1670 1675 1680 Gln Leu Gln Glu Glu Leu Ala Ala Ala Glu Arg Ala Lys Arg Gln 1685 1690 1695 Ala Gln Gln Glu Arg Asp Glu Leu Ala Asp Glu Ile Ala Asn Ser 1700 1705 1710 Ser Gly Lys Gly Ala Leu Ala Leu Glu Glu Lys Arg Arg Leu Glu 1715 1720 1725 Ala Arg Ile Ala Gln Leu Glu Glu Glu Leu Glu Glu Glu Gln Gly 1730 1735 1740 Asn Thr Glu Leu Ile Asn Asp Arg Leu Lys Lys Ala Asn Leu Gln 1745 1750 1755 Ile Asp Gln Ile Asn Thr Asp Leu Asn Leu Glu Arg Ser His Ala 1760 1765 1770 Gln Lys Asn Glu Asn Ala Arg Gln Gln Leu Glu Arg Gln Asn Lys 1775 1780 1785 Glu Leu Lys Val Lys Leu Gln Glu Met Glu Gly Thr Val Lys Ser 1790 1795 1800 Lys Tyr Lys Ala Ser Ile Thr Ala Leu Glu Ala Lys Ile Ala Gln 1805 1810 1815 Leu Glu Glu Gln Leu Asp Asn Glu Thr Lys Glu Arg Gln Ala Ala 1820 1825 1830 Cys Lys Gln Val Arg Arg Thr Glu Lys Lys Leu Lys Asp Val Leu 1835 1840 1845 Leu Gln Val Asp Asp Glu Arg Arg Asn Ala Glu Gln Tyr Lys Asp 1850 1855 1860 Gln Ala Asp Lys Ala Ser Thr Arg Leu Lys Gln Leu Lys Arg Gln 1865 1870 1875 Leu Glu Glu Ala Glu Glu Glu Ala Gln Arg Ala Asn Ala Ser Arg 1880 1885 1890 Arg Lys Leu Gln Arg Glu Leu Glu Asp Ala Thr Glu Thr Ala Asp 1895 1900 1905 Ala Met Asn Arg Glu Val Ser Ser Leu Lys Asn Lys Leu Arg Arg 1910 1915 1920 Gly Asp Leu Pro Phe Val Val Pro Arg Arg Met Ala Arg Lys Gly 1925 1930 1935 Ala Gly Asp Gly Ser Asp Glu Glu Val Asp Gly Lys Ala Asp Gly 1940 1945 1950 Ala Glu Ala Lys Pro Ala Glu 1955 1960 517666DNAHomo sapiens 51gtctttcctg ggagatgggc gcgcaaaccg accagtgggt ctgggggcgg cagtgatggg 60cgtggagatg gcccaatgag ggtgggagtg ggtggggcag gcgcgagcag cagtgctaaa 120ggagcccggc ggaggcagcg gtgggtttgg aattgagacg ctggatctgt ggtcgctgct 180ggggacgtgt gccggcgcca ccatcttcgg ctgaagaggc aattactttt gggtccttct 240gtttacaatg gcccagagaa ctggactgga ggatcccgag aggtatctct ttgtggacag 300ggctgtcatc tacaaccctg ccactcaagc tgactggaca gctaaaaagc tggtgtggat 360tccatcggaa cgccatggtt ttgaggcagc tagtattaaa gaagagcggg gcgatgaggt 420tatggtggag ctggcagaga atgggaagaa agcaatggtc aacaaagatg acattcagaa 480gatgaaccca ccaaagttct ccaaggtgga ggatatggca gagctgacat gcttgaacga 540agcctctgtc ttacataatt tgaaggaccg ctactattca ggacttatct atacttactc 600tggactcttc tgtgtggtga taaatcctta caagaacctt ccaatttact ctgagaatat 660tattgaaatg tatagaggga agaaacgcca tgagatgcca ccacacatct acgccatatc 720agagtctgct tacagatgca tgcttcaaga tcgtgaggac cagtcaattc tatgcacggg 780tgaatcgggt gccgggaaga cagaaaatac caagaaagtc attcagtacc ttgcccacgt 840tgcttcttct cacaaaggaa gaaaggacca taatattcct ggggaacttg aacggcagct 900tttacaagca aatccaattc tggaatcctt tggaaatgcg aagactgtga aaaatgataa 960ctcatctcgc tttggcaagt ttatccggat caactttgat gtaactggct atattgttgg 1020ggccaacatt gaaacatacc ttctggaaaa gtctcgtgct gttcgtcaag ctaaagatga 1080gcgtacattt catatctttt atcagttgct ctctggagca ggggaacacc tgaaatccga 1140cttactcctg gaaggtttca acaactacag attcctctcc aatggctata ttcctattcc 1200tggacagcaa gacaaggata acttccagga gaccatggaa gccatgcaca tcatgggctt 1260ctctcacgaa gagatcctct caatgcttaa agtcgtatct tcagtgctgc agtttggaaa 1320catctctttc aaaaaggaga gaaacactga ccaagcctcc atgccggaga acacagtcgc 1380acagaagctc tgccacctgc tcgggatgaa tgtgatggag ttcactcggg ctatcctcac 1440gcccaggatc aaggttggcc gggattacgt acagaaagcc cagaccaaag agcaggctga 1500ttttgcagtg gaagcattgg caaaagctac ctatgagcgg ttgtttcgct ggctcgttca 1560ccgcatcaat aaagcgctgg ataggaccaa acgccaggga gcttccttca ttgggatcct 1620ggatattgct ggttttgaaa tttttgagct gaactccttc gagcagctgt gcatcaacta 1680caccaacgag aagctgcagc agctgttcaa ccacaccatg ttcatcctgg agcaggagga 1740gtaccagcga gagggcatcg agtggaactt tatcgacttc ggcctggacc tgcagccctg 1800catcgacctg atagagagac ctgccaatcc ccctggcgtg ctggccctcc tggatgaaga 1860atgctggttc cccaaagcta cagataaaac atttgttgaa aagctggttc aggagcaagg 1920ttcccactcc aagtttcaga agccgcgcca actgaaagac aaagccgact tctgcatcat 1980ccactacgcg gggaaggtgg actataaggc agatgagtgg ctgatgaaga acatggaccc 2040gctgaatgac aacgtggcca ccctcctgca ccagtcctcg gacagatttg tggctgagct 2100ttggaaggac gtggaccgaa ttgtaggtct ggatcaagtc actgggatga ctgagaccgc 2160gtttggctct gcatacaaaa ccaagaaggg catgttccga accgtcgggc agctctacaa 2220ggagtctctc accaagctga tggcaactct ccgcaacacc aaccccaact tcgtccgctg 2280catcattcca aatcacgaga agcgggctgg gaaactggac ccgcacctcg tgctcgatca 2340gcttcgctgt aacggcgtcc tggaagggat ccggatctgt cgccaggggt tccccaaccg 2400gatagttttc caggaattca gacagagata tgagatccta actcccaatg ctattcctaa 2460aggcttcatg gatggcaaac aggcgtgtga gcgaatgatc cgagctttag aactggaccc 2520aaacctgtat agaattggac agagcaagat atttttccga gctggagttt tggcgcactt 2580agaagaagaa agagatttaa aaatcactga tatcatcatc tttttccaag ctgtatgcag 2640aggctacctc gcccgaaagg cctttgccaa gaaacagcaa caactaagtg ccttaaaggt 2700cttgcagcgg aactgtgcgg cgtacctgaa gctgcgacac tggcagtggt ggcgtgtctt 2760cacgaaggtg aagcctctcc tccaagtgac ccgccaggag gaagaactcc aggcaaaaga 2820tgaggagctg ctgaaggtga aagagaagca gacaaaagtg gaaggggagc ttgaggagat 2880ggagcggaag caccagcagc tgctggaaga gaagaatatc ctggcagaac aactgcaagc 2940cgagaccgag ctcttcgctg aagcagaaga gatgagagca aggcttgctg ccaaaaagca 3000ggaactggag gagattctcc atgacctcga gtccagggtg gaggaggagg aagagcggaa 3060ccagatccta cagaatgaga agaagaagat gcaggcgcac attcaggacc tagaagaaca 3120actggatgag gaggaggggg cccggcaaaa gctgcagctg gagaaggtga cagcagaggc 3180taaaatcaag aagatggaag aggaggttct gcttctcgaa gaccagaatt ccaaatttat 3240caaagaaaag aaactcatgg aagaccgaat tgctgagtgt tcctctcagc tggctgaaga 3300ggaagaaaag gcaaaaaact tggccaaaat caggaataag caagaagtga tgatctcgga 3360cttagaagaa cgcttgaaga aggaggagaa aactcgacag gaactggaaa aggccaaacg 3420gaagctggat ggggaaacaa ccgatctgca ggaccagatc gctgagctgc aggcacaggt 3480cgatgagctc aaagtccagt tgaccaagaa ggaggaggag cttcaggggg cgctggccag 3540aggagatgat gagacactgc acaagaataa tgcacttaaa gttgcacggg agctgcaggc 3600ccaaatcgca gagctccagg aagactttga gtctgaaaag gcttcaagga acaaggctga 3660gaaacaaaaa cgggacttga gtgaggagct ggaagctctg aagacagagc tggaggacac 3720cctagacacc acagcagctc agcaggaact ccgcacaaaa cgtgagcagg aagtggcaga 3780gctgaagaag gctcttgagg atgaaactaa gaaccacgaa gctcagatcc aggacatgag 3840acagaggcat gccacagcgc tggaggagct ttccgagcag ctggagcaag cgaaaaggtt 3900caaagccaac ctggagaaga acaaacaggg cctggagaca gacaacaagg agctggcgtg 3960tgaggtgaag gtgctgcagc aggtgaaggc ggagtcagag cacaagagga agaagctgga 4020tgcccaggtc caggagctcc atgccaaggt gtcagagggt gacaggctca gggtagagct 4080ggccgagaaa gcaaacaagc tacagaatga gctggataat gtgtcaaccc tgctggaaga 4140agctgagaag aaaggtatta agtttgcgaa ggatgcagct ggtctcgagt ctcaactaca 4200ggacacacag gagctccttc aggaagagac acggcagaaa ctgaacctga gcagtcggat 4260ccggcagctg gaggaggaga agaacagcct tcaggagcag caggaggagg aggaggaggc 4320caggaagaac ctggagaagc aggtgttggc tctgcagtcc cagctggctg acaccaagaa 4380gaaagtggac gatgacctgg ggacaatcga gagtttggag gaagccaaaa agaaactgct 4440caaggatgtg gaggcgctga gccagcggct ggaggagaag gtcctggcgt atgacaagct 4500ggagaagacc aagaaccggc tgcaacaaga actggatgac ctgacggtgg acctggacca 4560ccagcgccag atcgtctcca acttggagaa gaaacagaag aagttcgacc agctgttggc 4620agaagaaaag ggcatctctg ctcgctatgc agaagagcgg gaccgggctg aagctgaggc 4680cagagagaaa gaaaccaaag cgctctccct ggcgcgggcc cttgaggagg ccttggaggc 4740gaaggaggaa ttcgagaggc agaacaagca gcttcgagca gacatggaag acctgatgag 4800ctctaaagac gatgtgggga agaacgtcca cgagcttgag aaatccaagc gagccttgga 4860gcagcaggtg gaggagatgc ggacccagct ggaggagctg gaggacgagc tgcaggccac 4920tgaggatgcc aagctccgcc tggaagtcaa catgcaggcc atgaaggccc agtttgagag 4980ggacctgcaa acccgagatg agcagaatga agaaaagaag cggctgctgc ttaagcaggt 5040gcgggagctc gaggcagagc tggaggatga gcggaaacag cgggcactgg ctgtggcgtc 5100aaagaagaag atggagatag acctgaagga cctggaggct cagatcgagg ctgcgaacaa 5160agcccgggat gaagtgatca agcagcttcg caaacttcag gcacagatga aggattacca 5220gcgtgaacta gaagaggctc gagcatctag agatgagatt tttgctcaat ccaaagaaag 5280tgaaaagaaa ctgaagagtc tagaagcaga aattcttcag ctgcaagagg agctggcctc 5340atccgagcga gcccgccgac acgcagagca ggagcgagac gagctggctg atgagatcgc 5400caacagcgcc tctggaaagt ctgcgctgtt ggatgagaag cggcgcctgg aagcgcggat 5460cgcacagctg gaagaggagc tggaggagga gcagagcaac atggagctgc tcaatgaccg 5520cttccgcaag accacgctgc aggtggacac actgaacaca gagctggcag cagagcgcag 5580cgctgcccag aagagtgaca atgcccgcca gcagctggag cgacaaaaca aggagctgaa 5640ggccaagctg caggagctgg agggggcagt caagtccaag ttcaaggcta ccatctcagc 5700cctggaagcc aagattgggc agctggagga gcagcttgag caggaagcca aggagcgagc 5760agctgccaac aaactagtcc gtcgaacaga gaagaaactg aaagaaatct tcatgcaggt 5820tgaagacgag cgtcggcatg cggatcagta taaggagcag atggagaagg ctaatgccag 5880gatgaagcag cttaaacgac agttggaaga ggctgaggaa gaggccacac gtgccaacgc 5940atctcggcgt aaactccaaa gggagctgga cgacgccact gaggccaatg aaggcctgag 6000ccgcgaggtc agcactctca agaaccggct caggcggggc ggtccaatca gcttttcttc 6060aagccgatct ggccggcgcc agctgcacat tgagggggca tcgctagagc tgtcagatga 6120cgacacagaa agtaagacca gtgatgtcaa tgacacacag ccaccccaat cagaataggc 6180acaggaggtc agaggtgatg ctgaggacag gccagaactc atcccagcac cagtctgctt 6240gagccctgca ctcactgctc gggaatggca agctcccaga ttccttccag gaaagtcaac 6300tgtgtcttaa ggctttgcgg cctgcgcaga ctatatcctg cttcagacta gatacaattg 6360ccccttttta tatatacacc tccacaagac atgcgtatta aacagattgt ctcatcgttg 6420catctatttt ccatgtattc atcaagagac cattttatga cacattaaga agaaagaacc 6480tttttgaaac aaactccagg ccctttgttg ccagtggctg ggcctaaggg ttgccccggg 6540accgtgctca gctgctctgc atgccctgtc ctactgacag gtaccttagt tctgtgttca 6600tgtggccctg acccttcctt caaccacacc tggtctctta gaacattgtg aacctaacct 6660gcacttgtgt ctctcatttc ctgtgaatag tgatcactgt ctcagtgagc aaactgggag 6720aggggctttg gcggcttagg ggtgggtttg gattggggaa gcagcatcca tttggggttc 6780tcctgcccat ctcccaaggg gtgaccctgc ccctcaaatt catggtgtcc ccaccgtctc 6840aatgtgaata gtctcagagc tctgtgcaca gagaggacag tggccacaac acataaggtg 6900ccccgggtgg cagccatcac agtaacttcc aggtggtctc ctgagtgtct ggcttgataa 6960tgccctcaat tcaggagtga gcctctgtga cccttggggt gctcgcagaa ggcctctcca 7020agcagtcaag ccctcttgca aattcagcca ctgctttgag cccaaaacgg gaatattagt 7080tttatgtcgg aggtgtgttc caagtttgtc aatgaggcta tagcctcaag aagatgccat 7140ctgcctgaat gttgacatgc cagcgggcgt gtgacccttc attttccctt tcccttcctt 7200tggacagtgt tacaatgaac acttagcatt ctgtttttgg ttgatagttg agcaaactga 7260cattacagaa agtgccttag acactacagt actaagacaa tgttaaatat attatttgcc 7320tctataacaa cttaatgtat taagttctga ctgtgcttca tatcatgtac ctctctagtg 7380aagtagatgc gcaaacattc agtgacagca aatcagtgtt agtgacaagc cccgaccgtg 7440gcgatgtgct ggaaaacacg gaccttttgg gttaaaagct ttaacatctg tgaggaagaa 7500ctggtcacat gggtttggaa tctttgattt cccctgtatg aattgtactg gctgttgacc 7560accagacacc tgactgcaaa tatcttttct tgtattccca tatttctaga caatgatttt 7620tgtaagacaa taaatttatt cattatagaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaa 7666521976PRTMus musculus 52Met Ala Gln Arg Thr Gly Leu Glu Asp Pro Glu Arg Tyr Leu Phe Val 1 5 10 15 Asp Arg Ala Val Ile Tyr Asn Pro Ala Thr Gln Ala Asp Trp Thr Ala 20 25 30 Lys Lys Leu Val Trp Ile Pro Ser Glu Arg His Gly Phe Glu Ala Ala 35 40 45 Ser Ile Lys Glu Glu Arg Gly Asp Glu Val Met Val Glu Leu Ala Glu 50 55 60 Asn Gly Lys Lys Ala Met Val Asn Lys Asp Asp Ile Gln Lys Met Asn 65 70 75 80 Pro Pro Lys Phe Ser Lys Val Glu Asp Met Ala Glu Leu Thr Cys Leu 85 90 95 Asn Glu Ala Ser Val Leu His Asn Leu Lys Asp Arg Tyr Tyr Ser Gly 100 105 110 Leu Ile Tyr Thr Tyr Ser Gly Leu Phe Cys Val Val Ile Asn Pro Tyr 115 120 125 Lys Asn Leu Pro Ile Tyr Ser Glu Asn Ile Ile Glu Met Tyr Arg Gly 130 135

140 Lys Lys Arg His Glu Met Pro Pro His Ile Tyr Ala Ile Ser Glu Ser 145 150 155 160 Ala Tyr Arg Cys Met Leu Gln Asp Arg Glu Asp Gln Ser Ile Leu Cys 165 170 175 Thr Gly Glu Ser Gly Ala Gly Lys Thr Glu Asn Thr Lys Lys Val Ile 180 185 190 Gln Tyr Leu Ala His Val Ala Ser Ser His Lys Gly Arg Lys Asp His 195 200 205 Asn Ile Pro Gly Glu Leu Glu Arg Gln Leu Leu Gln Ala Asn Pro Ile 210 215 220 Leu Glu Ser Phe Gly Asn Ala Lys Thr Val Lys Asn Asp Asn Ser Ser 225 230 235 240 Arg Phe Gly Lys Phe Ile Arg Ile Asn Phe Asp Val Thr Gly Tyr Ile 245 250 255 Val Gly Ala Asn Ile Glu Thr Tyr Leu Leu Glu Lys Ser Arg Ala Val 260 265 270 Arg Gln Ala Lys Asp Glu Arg Thr Phe His Ile Phe Tyr Gln Leu Leu 275 280 285 Ser Gly Ala Gly Glu His Leu Lys Ser Asp Leu Leu Leu Glu Gly Phe 290 295 300 Asn Asn Tyr Arg Phe Leu Ser Asn Gly Tyr Ile Pro Ile Pro Gly Gln 305 310 315 320 Gln Asp Lys Asp Asn Phe Gln Glu Thr Met Glu Ala Met His Ile Met 325 330 335 Gly Phe Ser His Glu Glu Ile Leu Ser Met Leu Lys Val Val Ser Ser 340 345 350 Val Leu Gln Phe Gly Asn Ile Ser Phe Lys Lys Glu Arg Asn Thr Asp 355 360 365 Gln Ala Ser Met Pro Glu Asn Thr Val Ala Gln Lys Leu Cys His Leu 370 375 380 Leu Gly Met Asn Val Met Glu Phe Thr Arg Ala Ile Leu Thr Pro Arg 385 390 395 400 Ile Lys Val Gly Arg Asp Tyr Val Gln Lys Ala Gln Thr Lys Glu Gln 405 410 415 Ala Asp Phe Ala Val Glu Ala Leu Ala Lys Ala Thr Tyr Glu Arg Leu 420 425 430 Phe Arg Trp Leu Val His Arg Ile Asn Lys Ala Leu Asp Arg Thr Lys 435 440 445 Arg Gln Gly Ala Ser Phe Ile Gly Ile Leu Asp Ile Ala Gly Phe Glu 450 455 460 Ile Phe Glu Leu Asn Ser Phe Glu Gln Leu Cys Ile Asn Tyr Thr Asn 465 470 475 480 Glu Lys Leu Gln Gln Leu Phe Asn His Thr Met Phe Ile Leu Glu Gln 485 490 495 Glu Glu Tyr Gln Arg Glu Gly Ile Glu Trp Asn Phe Ile Asp Phe Gly 500 505 510 Leu Asp Leu Gln Pro Cys Ile Asp Leu Ile Glu Arg Pro Ala Asn Pro 515 520 525 Pro Gly Val Leu Ala Leu Leu Asp Glu Glu Cys Trp Phe Pro Lys Ala 530 535 540 Thr Asp Lys Thr Phe Val Glu Lys Leu Val Gln Glu Gln Gly Ser His 545 550 555 560 Ser Lys Phe Gln Lys Pro Arg Gln Leu Lys Asp Lys Ala Asp Phe Cys 565 570 575 Ile Ile His Tyr Ala Gly Lys Val Asp Tyr Lys Ala Asp Glu Trp Leu 580 585 590 Met Lys Asn Met Asp Pro Leu Asn Asp Asn Val Ala Thr Leu Leu His 595 600 605 Gln Ser Ser Asp Arg Phe Val Ala Glu Leu Trp Lys Asp Val Asp Arg 610 615 620 Ile Val Gly Leu Asp Gln Val Thr Gly Met Thr Glu Thr Ala Phe Gly 625 630 635 640 Ser Ala Tyr Lys Thr Lys Lys Gly Met Phe Arg Thr Val Gly Gln Leu 645 650 655 Tyr Lys Glu Ser Leu Thr Lys Leu Met Ala Thr Leu Arg Asn Thr Asn 660 665 670 Pro Asn Phe Val Arg Cys Ile Ile Pro Asn His Glu Lys Arg Ala Gly 675 680 685 Lys Leu Asp Pro His Leu Val Leu Asp Gln Leu Arg Cys Asn Gly Val 690 695 700 Leu Glu Gly Ile Arg Ile Cys Arg Gln Gly Phe Pro Asn Arg Ile Val 705 710 715 720 Phe Gln Glu Phe Arg Gln Arg Tyr Glu Ile Leu Thr Pro Asn Ala Ile 725 730 735 Pro Lys Gly Phe Met Asp Gly Lys Gln Ala Cys Glu Arg Met Ile Arg 740 745 750 Ala Leu Glu Leu Asp Pro Asn Leu Tyr Arg Ile Gly Gln Ser Lys Ile 755 760 765 Phe Phe Arg Ala Gly Val Leu Ala His Leu Glu Glu Glu Arg Asp Leu 770 775 780 Lys Ile Thr Asp Ile Ile Ile Phe Phe Gln Ala Val Cys Arg Gly Tyr 785 790 795 800 Leu Ala Arg Lys Ala Phe Ala Lys Lys Gln Gln Gln Leu Ser Ala Leu 805 810 815 Lys Val Leu Gln Arg Asn Cys Ala Ala Tyr Leu Lys Leu Arg His Trp 820 825 830 Gln Trp Trp Arg Val Phe Thr Lys Val Lys Pro Leu Leu Gln Val Thr 835 840 845 Arg Gln Glu Glu Glu Leu Gln Ala Lys Asp Glu Glu Leu Leu Lys Val 850 855 860 Lys Glu Lys Gln Thr Lys Val Glu Gly Glu Leu Glu Glu Met Glu Arg 865 870 875 880 Lys His Gln Gln Leu Leu Glu Glu Lys Asn Ile Leu Ala Glu Gln Leu 885 890 895 Gln Ala Glu Thr Glu Leu Phe Ala Glu Ala Glu Glu Met Arg Ala Arg 900 905 910 Leu Ala Ala Lys Lys Gln Glu Leu Glu Glu Ile Leu His Asp Leu Glu 915 920 925 Ser Arg Val Glu Glu Glu Glu Glu Arg Asn Gln Ile Leu Gln Asn Glu 930 935 940 Lys Lys Lys Met Gln Ala His Ile Gln Asp Leu Glu Glu Gln Leu Asp 945 950 955 960 Glu Glu Glu Gly Ala Arg Gln Lys Leu Gln Leu Glu Lys Val Thr Ala 965 970 975 Glu Ala Lys Ile Lys Lys Met Glu Glu Glu Val Leu Leu Leu Glu Asp 980 985 990 Gln Asn Ser Lys Phe Ile Lys Glu Lys Lys Leu Met Glu Asp Arg Ile 995 1000 1005 Ala Glu Cys Ser Ser Gln Leu Ala Glu Glu Glu Glu Lys Ala Lys 1010 1015 1020 Asn Leu Ala Lys Ile Arg Asn Lys Gln Glu Val Met Ile Ser Asp 1025 1030 1035 Leu Glu Glu Arg Leu Lys Lys Glu Glu Lys Thr Arg Gln Glu Leu 1040 1045 1050 Glu Lys Ala Lys Arg Lys Leu Asp Gly Glu Thr Thr Asp Leu Gln 1055 1060 1065 Asp Gln Ile Ala Glu Leu Gln Ala Gln Val Asp Glu Leu Lys Val 1070 1075 1080 Gln Leu Thr Lys Lys Glu Glu Glu Leu Gln Gly Ala Leu Ala Arg 1085 1090 1095 Gly Asp Asp Glu Thr Leu His Lys Asn Asn Ala Leu Lys Val Ala 1100 1105 1110 Arg Glu Leu Gln Ala Gln Ile Ala Glu Leu Gln Glu Asp Phe Glu 1115 1120 1125 Ser Glu Lys Ala Ser Arg Asn Lys Ala Glu Lys Gln Lys Arg Asp 1130 1135 1140 Leu Ser Glu Glu Leu Glu Ala Leu Lys Thr Glu Leu Glu Asp Thr 1145 1150 1155 Leu Asp Thr Thr Ala Ala Gln Gln Glu Leu Arg Thr Lys Arg Glu 1160 1165 1170 Gln Glu Val Ala Glu Leu Lys Lys Ala Leu Glu Asp Glu Thr Lys 1175 1180 1185 Asn His Glu Ala Gln Ile Gln Asp Met Arg Gln Arg His Ala Thr 1190 1195 1200 Ala Leu Glu Glu Leu Ser Glu Gln Leu Glu Gln Ala Lys Arg Phe 1205 1210 1215 Lys Ala Asn Leu Glu Lys Asn Lys Gln Gly Leu Glu Thr Asp Asn 1220 1225 1230 Lys Glu Leu Ala Cys Glu Val Lys Val Leu Gln Gln Val Lys Ala 1235 1240 1245 Glu Ser Glu His Lys Arg Lys Lys Leu Asp Ala Gln Val Gln Glu 1250 1255 1260 Leu His Ala Lys Val Ser Glu Gly Asp Arg Leu Arg Val Glu Leu 1265 1270 1275 Ala Glu Lys Ala Asn Lys Leu Gln Asn Glu Leu Asp Asn Val Ser 1280 1285 1290 Thr Leu Leu Glu Glu Ala Glu Lys Lys Gly Ile Lys Phe Ala Lys 1295 1300 1305 Asp Ala Ala Gly Leu Glu Ser Gln Leu Gln Asp Thr Gln Glu Leu 1310 1315 1320 Leu Gln Glu Glu Thr Arg Gln Lys Leu Asn Leu Ser Ser Arg Ile 1325 1330 1335 Arg Gln Leu Glu Glu Glu Lys Asn Ser Leu Gln Glu Gln Gln Glu 1340 1345 1350 Glu Glu Glu Glu Ala Arg Lys Asn Leu Glu Lys Gln Val Leu Ala 1355 1360 1365 Leu Gln Ser Gln Leu Ala Asp Thr Lys Lys Lys Val Asp Asp Asp 1370 1375 1380 Leu Gly Thr Ile Glu Ser Leu Glu Glu Ala Lys Lys Lys Leu Leu 1385 1390 1395 Lys Asp Val Glu Ala Leu Ser Gln Arg Leu Glu Glu Lys Val Leu 1400 1405 1410 Ala Tyr Asp Lys Leu Glu Lys Thr Lys Asn Arg Leu Gln Gln Glu 1415 1420 1425 Leu Asp Asp Leu Thr Val Asp Leu Asp His Gln Arg Gln Ile Val 1430 1435 1440 Ser Asn Leu Glu Lys Lys Gln Lys Lys Phe Asp Gln Leu Leu Ala 1445 1450 1455 Glu Glu Lys Gly Ile Ser Ala Arg Tyr Ala Glu Glu Arg Asp Arg 1460 1465 1470 Ala Glu Ala Glu Ala Arg Glu Lys Glu Thr Lys Ala Leu Ser Leu 1475 1480 1485 Ala Arg Ala Leu Glu Glu Ala Leu Glu Ala Lys Glu Glu Phe Glu 1490 1495 1500 Arg Gln Asn Lys Gln Leu Arg Ala Asp Met Glu Asp Leu Met Ser 1505 1510 1515 Ser Lys Asp Asp Val Gly Lys Asn Val His Glu Leu Glu Lys Ser 1520 1525 1530 Lys Arg Ala Leu Glu Gln Gln Val Glu Glu Met Arg Thr Gln Leu 1535 1540 1545 Glu Glu Leu Glu Asp Glu Leu Gln Ala Thr Glu Asp Ala Lys Leu 1550 1555 1560 Arg Leu Glu Val Asn Met Gln Ala Met Lys Ala Gln Phe Glu Arg 1565 1570 1575 Asp Leu Gln Thr Arg Asp Glu Gln Asn Glu Glu Lys Lys Arg Leu 1580 1585 1590 Leu Leu Lys Gln Val Arg Glu Leu Glu Ala Glu Leu Glu Asp Glu 1595 1600 1605 Arg Lys Gln Arg Ala Leu Ala Val Ala Ser Lys Lys Lys Met Glu 1610 1615 1620 Ile Asp Leu Lys Asp Leu Glu Ala Gln Ile Glu Ala Ala Asn Lys 1625 1630 1635 Ala Arg Asp Glu Val Ile Lys Gln Leu Arg Lys Leu Gln Ala Gln 1640 1645 1650 Met Lys Asp Tyr Gln Arg Glu Leu Glu Glu Ala Arg Ala Ser Arg 1655 1660 1665 Asp Glu Ile Phe Ala Gln Ser Lys Glu Ser Glu Lys Lys Leu Lys 1670 1675 1680 Ser Leu Glu Ala Glu Ile Leu Gln Leu Gln Glu Glu Leu Ala Ser 1685 1690 1695 Ser Glu Arg Ala Arg Arg His Ala Glu Gln Glu Arg Asp Glu Leu 1700 1705 1710 Ala Asp Glu Ile Ala Asn Ser Ala Ser Gly Lys Ser Ala Leu Leu 1715 1720 1725 Asp Glu Lys Arg Arg Leu Glu Ala Arg Ile Ala Gln Leu Glu Glu 1730 1735 1740 Glu Leu Glu Glu Glu Gln Ser Asn Met Glu Leu Leu Asn Asp Arg 1745 1750 1755 Phe Arg Lys Thr Thr Leu Gln Val Asp Thr Leu Asn Thr Glu Leu 1760 1765 1770 Ala Ala Glu Arg Ser Ala Ala Gln Lys Ser Asp Asn Ala Arg Gln 1775 1780 1785 Gln Leu Glu Arg Gln Asn Lys Glu Leu Lys Ala Lys Leu Gln Glu 1790 1795 1800 Leu Glu Gly Ala Val Lys Ser Lys Phe Lys Ala Thr Ile Ser Ala 1805 1810 1815 Leu Glu Ala Lys Ile Gly Gln Leu Glu Glu Gln Leu Glu Gln Glu 1820 1825 1830 Ala Lys Glu Arg Ala Ala Ala Asn Lys Leu Val Arg Arg Thr Glu 1835 1840 1845 Lys Lys Leu Lys Glu Ile Phe Met Gln Val Glu Asp Glu Arg Arg 1850 1855 1860 His Ala Asp Gln Tyr Lys Glu Gln Met Glu Lys Ala Asn Ala Arg 1865 1870 1875 Met Lys Gln Leu Lys Arg Gln Leu Glu Glu Ala Glu Glu Glu Ala 1880 1885 1890 Thr Arg Ala Asn Ala Ser Arg Arg Lys Leu Gln Arg Glu Leu Asp 1895 1900 1905 Asp Ala Thr Glu Ala Asn Glu Gly Leu Ser Arg Glu Val Ser Thr 1910 1915 1920 Leu Lys Asn Arg Leu Arg Arg Gly Gly Pro Ile Ser Phe Ser Ser 1925 1930 1935 Ser Arg Ser Gly Arg Arg Gln Leu His Ile Glu Gly Ala Ser Leu 1940 1945 1950 Glu Leu Ser Asp Asp Asp Thr Glu Ser Lys Thr Ser Asp Val Asn 1955 1960 1965 Asp Thr Gln Pro Pro Gln Ser Glu 1970 1975 537619DNAHomo sapiens 53actgaggcgc tggatctgtg gtcgcggctg gggacgtgcg cccgcgccac catcttcggc 60tgaagaggca attgcttttg gatcgttcca tttacaatgg cgcagagaac tggactcgag 120gatccagaga ggtatctctt tgtggacagg gctgtcatct acaaccctgc cactcaagct 180gattggacag ctaaaaagct agtgtggatt ccatcagaac gccatggttt tgaggcagct 240agtatcaaag aagaacgggg agatgaagtt atggtggagt tggcagagaa tggaaagaaa 300gcaatggtca acaaagatga tattcagaag atgaacccac ctaagttttc caaggtggag 360gatatggcag aattgacatg cttgaatgaa gcttccgttt tacataatct gaaggatcgc 420tactattcag gactaatcta tacttattct ggactcttct gtgtagttat aaacccttac 480aagaatcttc caatttactc tgagaatatt attgaaatgt acagagggaa gaagcgtcat 540gagatgcctc cacacatcta tgctatatct gaatctgctt acagatgcat gcttcaagat 600cgtgaggacc agtcaattct ttgcacgggt gagtcaggtg ctgggaagac agaaaataca 660aagaaagtta ttcagtacct tgcccatgtt gcttcttcac ataaaggaag aaaggaccat 720aatattcctg gggaacttga acggcagctt ttgcaagcaa atccaattct ggaatcattt 780ggaaatgcga agactgtgaa aaatgataac tcatctcgtt ttggcaaatt tattcggatc 840aactttgatg taactggcta tatcgttggg gccaacattg aaacatacct tctggaaaag 900tctcgtgctg ttcgtcaagc aaaagatgaa cgtacttttc atatctttta ccagttgtta 960tctggagcag gagaacacct aaagtctgat ttgcttcttg aaggatttaa taactacagg 1020tttctctcca atggctatat tcctattccg ggacagcaag acaaagataa tttccaggag 1080accatggaag caatgcacat aatgggcttc tcccatgaag agattctgtc aatgcttaaa 1140gtagtatctt cagtgctaca gtttggaaat atttctttca aaaaggagag aaatactgat 1200caagcttcca tgccagaaaa tacagttgcg cagaagctct gccatcttct tgggatgaat 1260gtgatggagt ttactcgggc catcctgact ccccggatca aggtcggccg agactatgtg 1320caaaaagccc agaccaaaga acaggcagat tttgcagtag aagcattggc aaaagctacc 1380tatgagcggc tctttcgctg gctcgttcat cgcatcaata aagctctgga taggaccaaa 1440cgtcagggag catctttcat tggaatcctg gatattgctg gatttgaaat ttttgagctg 1500aactcctttg aacaactttg catcaactac accaatgaga agctgcagca gctgttcaac 1560cacaccatgt ttatcctaga acaagaggaa taccagcgcg aaggcatcga gtggaacttc 1620atcgatttcg ggctggatct gcagccatgc atcgacctaa tagagagacc tgcgaaccct 1680cctggtgtac tggccctttt ggatgaagaa tgctggttcc ctaaagccac agataaaacc 1740tttgttgaaa aactggttca agagcaaggt tcccactcca agtttcagaa acctcgacaa 1800ttaaaagaca aagctgattt ttgcattata cattatgcag ggaaggtgga ctataaggca 1860gatgagtggc tgatgaagaa tatggacccc ctgaatgaca acgtggccac ccttttgcac 1920cagtcatcag acagatttgt ggcagagctt tggaaagatg tggaccgtat cgtgggtctg 1980gatcaagtca ctggtatgac tgagacagct tttggctccg catataaaac caagaagggc 2040atgtttcgta ccgttgggca actctacaaa gaatctctca ccaagctgat ggcaactctc 2100cgaaacacca accctaactt tgttcgttgt atcattccaa atcacgagaa gagggctgga 2160aaattggatc cacacctagt cctagatcag cttcgctgta atggtgtcct ggaagggatc 2220cgaatctgtc gccagggctt ccctaaccga atagttttcc aggaattcag acagagatat 2280gagatcctaa ctccaaatgc tattcctaaa ggttttatgg atggtaaaca ggcctgtgaa 2340cgaatgatcc gggctttaga attggaccca aacttgtaca gaattggaca gagcaagata 2400tttttcagag ctggagttct ggcacactta gaggaagaaa gagatttaaa aatcaccgat 2460atcattatct tcttccaggc cgtttgcaga ggttacctgg ccagaaaggc ctttgccaag 2520aagcagcagc aactaagtgc cttaaaggtc ttgcagcgga actgtgccgc gtacctgaaa 2580ttacggcact ggcagtggtg gcgagtcttc acaaaggtga agccgcttct acaagtgact 2640cgccaggagg aagaacttca ggccaaagat gaagagctgt tgaaggtgaa ggagaagcag 2700acgaaggtgg aaggagagct ggaggagatg gagcggaagc

accagcagct tttagaagag 2760aagaatatcc ttgcagaaca actacaagca gagactgagc tctttgctga agcagaagag 2820atgagggcaa gacttgctgc taaaaagcag gaattagaag agattctaca tgacttggag 2880tctagggttg aagaagaaga agaaagaaac caaatcctcc aaaatgaaaa gaaaaaaatg 2940caagcacata ttcaggacct ggaagaacag ctagacgagg aggaaggggc tcggcaaaag 3000ctgcagctgg aaaaggtgac agcagaggcc aagatcaaga agatggaaga ggagattctg 3060cttctcgagg accaaaattc caagttcatc aaagaaaaga aactcatgga agatcgcatt 3120gctgagtgtt cctctcagct ggctgaagag gaagaaaagg cgaaaaactt ggccaaaatc 3180aggaataagc aagaagtgat gatctcagat ttagaagaac gcttaaagaa ggaagaaaag 3240actcgtcagg aactggaaaa ggccaaaaga aaactcgacg gggagacgac cgacctgcag 3300gaccagatcg cagagctgca ggcgcagatt gatgagctca agctgcagct ggccaagaag 3360gaggaggagc tgcagggcgc actggccaga ggtgatgatg aaacactcca taagaacaat 3420gcccttaaag ttgtgcgaga gctacaagcc caaattgctg aacttcagga agactttgaa 3480tccgagaagg cttcacggaa caaggccgaa aagcagaaaa gggacttgag tgaggaactg 3540gaagctctga aaacagagct ggaggacacg ctggacacca cggcagccca gcaggaacta 3600cgtacaaaac gtgaacaaga agtggcagag ctgaagaaag ctcttgagga ggaaactaag 3660aaccatgaag ctcaaatcca ggacatgaga caaagacacg caacagccct ggaggagctc 3720tcagagcagc tggaacaggc caagcggttc aaagcaaatc tagagaagaa caagcagggc 3780ctggagacag ataacaagga gctggcgtgt gaggtgaagg tcctgcagca ggtcaaggct 3840gagtctgagc acaagaggaa gaagctcgac gcgcaggtcc aggagctcca tgccaaggtc 3900tctgaaggcg acaggctcag ggtggagctg gcggagaaag caagtaagct gcagaatgag 3960ctagataatg tctccaccct tctggaagaa gcagagaaga agggtattaa atttgctaag 4020gatgcagcta gtcttgagtc tcaactacag gatacacagg agcttcttca ggaggagaca 4080cgccagaaac taaacctgag cagtcggatc cggcagctgg aagaggagaa gaacagtctt 4140caggagcagc aggaggagga ggaggaggcc aggaagaacc tggagaagca agtgctggcc 4200ctgcagtccc agttggctga taccaagaag aaagtagatg acgacctggg aacaattgaa 4260agtctggaag aagccaagaa gaagcttctg aaggacgcgg aggccctgag ccagcgcctg 4320gaggagaagg cactggcgta tgacaaactg gagaagacca agaaccgcct gcagcaggag 4380ctggacgacc tcacggtgga cctggaccac cagcgccagg tcgcctccaa cttggagaag 4440aagcagaaga agtttgacca gctgttagca gaagagaaga gcatctctgc tcgctatgcc 4500gaagagcggg accgggccga agccgaggcc agagagaaag aaaccaaagc cctgtcactg 4560gcccgggccc tcgaggaagc cctggaggcc aaggaggagt ttgagaggca gaacaagcag 4620ctccgagcag acatggaaga cctcatgagc tccaaagatg atgtgggaaa aaacgttcac 4680gaacttgaaa aatccaaacg ggccctagag cagcaggtgg aggaaatgag gacccagctg 4740gaggagctgg aagacgaact ccaggccacg gaagatgcca agcttcgtct ggaggtcaac 4800atgcaggcca tgaaggcgca gttcgagaga gacctgcaaa ccagggatga gcagaatgaa 4860gagaagaagc ggctgctgat caaacaggtg cgggagctcg aggcggagct ggaggatgag 4920aggaaacagc gggcgcttgc tgtagcttca aagaaaaaga tggagataga cctgaaggac 4980ctcgaagccc aaatcgaggc tgcgaacaaa gctcgggatg aggtgattaa gcagctccgc 5040aagctccagg ctcagatgaa ggattaccaa cgtgaattag aagaagctcg tgcatccaga 5100gatgagattt ttgctcaatc caaagagagt gaaaagaaat tgaagagtct ggaagcagaa 5160atccttcaat tgcaggagga acttgcctca tctgagcgag cccgccgaca cgccgagcag 5220gagagagatg agctggcgga cgagatcacc aacagcgcct ctggcaagtc cgcgctgctg 5280gatgagaagc ggcgtctgga agctcggatc gcacagctgg aggaggagct ggaagaggag 5340cagagcaaca tggagctgct caacgaccgc ttccgcaaga ccactctaca ggtggacaca 5400ctgaacgccg agctagcagc cgagcgcagc gccgcccaga agagtgacaa tgcacgccag 5460caactggagc ggcagaacaa ggagctgaag gccaagctgc aggaactcga gggtgctgtc 5520aagtctaagt tcaaggccac catctcagcc ctggaggcca agattgggca gctggaggag 5580cagcttgagc aggaagccaa ggaacgagca gccgccaaca aattagtccg tcgcactgag 5640aagaagctga aagaaatctt catgcaggtt gaggatgagc gtcgacacgc ggaccagtat 5700aaagagcaga tggagaaggc caacgctcgg atgaagcagc ttaaacgcca gctggaggaa 5760gcagaagaag aagcgacgcg tgccaacgca tctcggcgta aactccagcg ggaactggat 5820gatgccaccg aggccaacga gggcctgagc cgcgaggtca gcaccctgaa gaaccggctg 5880aggcggggtg gccccatcag cttctcttcc agccgatctg gccggcgcca gctgcacctt 5940gaaggagctt ccctggagct ctccgacgat gacacagaaa gtaagaccag tgatgtcaac 6000gagacgcagc caccccagtc agagtaaagt tgcaggaagc cagaggaggc aatacagtgg 6060gacagttagg aatgcacccg gggcctcctg cagatttcgg aaattggcaa gctacgggat 6120tccttcctga aagatcaact gtgtcttaag gctctccagc ctatgcatac tgtatcctgc 6180ttcagactta ggtacaattg ctcccctttt tatatataga cacacacagg acacatatat 6240taaacagatt gtttcatcat tgcatctatt ttccatatag tcatcaagag accattttat 6300aaaacatggt aagacccttt ttaaaacaaa ctccaggccc ttggttgcgg gtcgctgggt 6360tattggggca gcgccgtggt cgtcactcag tcgctctgca tgctctctgt catacagaca 6420ggtaacctag ttctgtgttc acgtggcccc cgactcctca gccacatcaa gtctcctaga 6480ccactgtgga ctctaaactg cacttgtctc tctcatttcc ttcaaataat gatcaatgct 6540atttcagtga gcaaactgtg aaaggggctt tggaaagagt aggaggggtg ggctggatcg 6600gaagcaacac ccatttgggg ttaccatgtc catcccccaa ggggggccct gcccctcgag 6660tcgatggtgt cccgcatcta ctcatgtgaa ctggccttgg cgagggctgg tctgtgcata 6720gaagggatag tggccacact gcagctgagg ccccaggtgg cagccatgga tcatgtagac 6780ttccagatgg tctcccgaac cgcctggctc tgccggcgcc ctcctcacgt caggagcaag 6840cagccgtgga cccctaagcc gagctggtgg aaggcccctc cctgtcgcca gccgggccct 6900catgctgacc ttgcaaattc agccgctgct ttgagcccaa aatgggaata ttggttttgt 6960gtccgaggct tgttccaagt ttgtcaatga ggtttatgga gcctccagaa cagatgccat 7020cttcctgaat gttgacatgc cagtgggtgt gactccttca tttttccttc tcccttccct 7080ttggacagtg ttacagtgaa cacttagcat cctgtttttg gttggtagtt aagcaaactg 7140acattacgga aagtgcctta gacactacag tactaagaca atgttgaata tatcattcgc 7200ctctataaca atttaatgta ttcagttttg actgtgcttc atatcatgta cctctctagt 7260caaagtggta ttacagacat tcagtgacaa tgaatcagtg ttaattctaa atccttgatc 7320ctctgcaatg tgcttgaaaa cacaaacctt ttgggttaaa agctttaaca tctattagga 7380agaatttgtc ctgtgggttt ggaatcttgg attttccccc tttatgaact gtactggctg 7440ttgaccacca gacacctgac cgcaaatatc ttttcttgta ttcccatatt tctagacaat 7500gatttttgta agacaataaa tttattcatt atagatattt gcgcctgctc tgtttacttg 7560aagaaaaaag cacccgtgga gaataaagag acctcaataa acaagaataa tcatgtgaa 7619541976PRTHomo sapiens 54Met Ala Gln Arg Thr Gly Leu Glu Asp Pro Glu Arg Tyr Leu Phe Val 1 5 10 15 Asp Arg Ala Val Ile Tyr Asn Pro Ala Thr Gln Ala Asp Trp Thr Ala 20 25 30 Lys Lys Leu Val Trp Ile Pro Ser Glu Arg His Gly Phe Glu Ala Ala 35 40 45 Ser Ile Lys Glu Glu Arg Gly Asp Glu Val Met Val Glu Leu Ala Glu 50 55 60 Asn Gly Lys Lys Ala Met Val Asn Lys Asp Asp Ile Gln Lys Met Asn 65 70 75 80 Pro Pro Lys Phe Ser Lys Val Glu Asp Met Ala Glu Leu Thr Cys Leu 85 90 95 Asn Glu Ala Ser Val Leu His Asn Leu Lys Asp Arg Tyr Tyr Ser Gly 100 105 110 Leu Ile Tyr Thr Tyr Ser Gly Leu Phe Cys Val Val Ile Asn Pro Tyr 115 120 125 Lys Asn Leu Pro Ile Tyr Ser Glu Asn Ile Ile Glu Met Tyr Arg Gly 130 135 140 Lys Lys Arg His Glu Met Pro Pro His Ile Tyr Ala Ile Ser Glu Ser 145 150 155 160 Ala Tyr Arg Cys Met Leu Gln Asp Arg Glu Asp Gln Ser Ile Leu Cys 165 170 175 Thr Gly Glu Ser Gly Ala Gly Lys Thr Glu Asn Thr Lys Lys Val Ile 180 185 190 Gln Tyr Leu Ala His Val Ala Ser Ser His Lys Gly Arg Lys Asp His 195 200 205 Asn Ile Pro Gly Glu Leu Glu Arg Gln Leu Leu Gln Ala Asn Pro Ile 210 215 220 Leu Glu Ser Phe Gly Asn Ala Lys Thr Val Lys Asn Asp Asn Ser Ser 225 230 235 240 Arg Phe Gly Lys Phe Ile Arg Ile Asn Phe Asp Val Thr Gly Tyr Ile 245 250 255 Val Gly Ala Asn Ile Glu Thr Tyr Leu Leu Glu Lys Ser Arg Ala Val 260 265 270 Arg Gln Ala Lys Asp Glu Arg Thr Phe His Ile Phe Tyr Gln Leu Leu 275 280 285 Ser Gly Ala Gly Glu His Leu Lys Ser Asp Leu Leu Leu Glu Gly Phe 290 295 300 Asn Asn Tyr Arg Phe Leu Ser Asn Gly Tyr Ile Pro Ile Pro Gly Gln 305 310 315 320 Gln Asp Lys Asp Asn Phe Gln Glu Thr Met Glu Ala Met His Ile Met 325 330 335 Gly Phe Ser His Glu Glu Ile Leu Ser Met Leu Lys Val Val Ser Ser 340 345 350 Val Leu Gln Phe Gly Asn Ile Ser Phe Lys Lys Glu Arg Asn Thr Asp 355 360 365 Gln Ala Ser Met Pro Glu Asn Thr Val Ala Gln Lys Leu Cys His Leu 370 375 380 Leu Gly Met Asn Val Met Glu Phe Thr Arg Ala Ile Leu Thr Pro Arg 385 390 395 400 Ile Lys Val Gly Arg Asp Tyr Val Gln Lys Ala Gln Thr Lys Glu Gln 405 410 415 Ala Asp Phe Ala Val Glu Ala Leu Ala Lys Ala Thr Tyr Glu Arg Leu 420 425 430 Phe Arg Trp Leu Val His Arg Ile Asn Lys Ala Leu Asp Arg Thr Lys 435 440 445 Arg Gln Gly Ala Ser Phe Ile Gly Ile Leu Asp Ile Ala Gly Phe Glu 450 455 460 Ile Phe Glu Leu Asn Ser Phe Glu Gln Leu Cys Ile Asn Tyr Thr Asn 465 470 475 480 Glu Lys Leu Gln Gln Leu Phe Asn His Thr Met Phe Ile Leu Glu Gln 485 490 495 Glu Glu Tyr Gln Arg Glu Gly Ile Glu Trp Asn Phe Ile Asp Phe Gly 500 505 510 Leu Asp Leu Gln Pro Cys Ile Asp Leu Ile Glu Arg Pro Ala Asn Pro 515 520 525 Pro Gly Val Leu Ala Leu Leu Asp Glu Glu Cys Trp Phe Pro Lys Ala 530 535 540 Thr Asp Lys Thr Phe Val Glu Lys Leu Val Gln Glu Gln Gly Ser His 545 550 555 560 Ser Lys Phe Gln Lys Pro Arg Gln Leu Lys Asp Lys Ala Asp Phe Cys 565 570 575 Ile Ile His Tyr Ala Gly Lys Val Asp Tyr Lys Ala Asp Glu Trp Leu 580 585 590 Met Lys Asn Met Asp Pro Leu Asn Asp Asn Val Ala Thr Leu Leu His 595 600 605 Gln Ser Ser Asp Arg Phe Val Ala Glu Leu Trp Lys Asp Val Asp Arg 610 615 620 Ile Val Gly Leu Asp Gln Val Thr Gly Met Thr Glu Thr Ala Phe Gly 625 630 635 640 Ser Ala Tyr Lys Thr Lys Lys Gly Met Phe Arg Thr Val Gly Gln Leu 645 650 655 Tyr Lys Glu Ser Leu Thr Lys Leu Met Ala Thr Leu Arg Asn Thr Asn 660 665 670 Pro Asn Phe Val Arg Cys Ile Ile Pro Asn His Glu Lys Arg Ala Gly 675 680 685 Lys Leu Asp Pro His Leu Val Leu Asp Gln Leu Arg Cys Asn Gly Val 690 695 700 Leu Glu Gly Ile Arg Ile Cys Arg Gln Gly Phe Pro Asn Arg Ile Val 705 710 715 720 Phe Gln Glu Phe Arg Gln Arg Tyr Glu Ile Leu Thr Pro Asn Ala Ile 725 730 735 Pro Lys Gly Phe Met Asp Gly Lys Gln Ala Cys Glu Arg Met Ile Arg 740 745 750 Ala Leu Glu Leu Asp Pro Asn Leu Tyr Arg Ile Gly Gln Ser Lys Ile 755 760 765 Phe Phe Arg Ala Gly Val Leu Ala His Leu Glu Glu Glu Arg Asp Leu 770 775 780 Lys Ile Thr Asp Ile Ile Ile Phe Phe Gln Ala Val Cys Arg Gly Tyr 785 790 795 800 Leu Ala Arg Lys Ala Phe Ala Lys Lys Gln Gln Gln Leu Ser Ala Leu 805 810 815 Lys Val Leu Gln Arg Asn Cys Ala Ala Tyr Leu Lys Leu Arg His Trp 820 825 830 Gln Trp Trp Arg Val Phe Thr Lys Val Lys Pro Leu Leu Gln Val Thr 835 840 845 Arg Gln Glu Glu Glu Leu Gln Ala Lys Asp Glu Glu Leu Leu Lys Val 850 855 860 Lys Glu Lys Gln Thr Lys Val Glu Gly Glu Leu Glu Glu Met Glu Arg 865 870 875 880 Lys His Gln Gln Leu Leu Glu Glu Lys Asn Ile Leu Ala Glu Gln Leu 885 890 895 Gln Ala Glu Thr Glu Leu Phe Ala Glu Ala Glu Glu Met Arg Ala Arg 900 905 910 Leu Ala Ala Lys Lys Gln Glu Leu Glu Glu Ile Leu His Asp Leu Glu 915 920 925 Ser Arg Val Glu Glu Glu Glu Glu Arg Asn Gln Ile Leu Gln Asn Glu 930 935 940 Lys Lys Lys Met Gln Ala His Ile Gln Asp Leu Glu Glu Gln Leu Asp 945 950 955 960 Glu Glu Glu Gly Ala Arg Gln Lys Leu Gln Leu Glu Lys Val Thr Ala 965 970 975 Glu Ala Lys Ile Lys Lys Met Glu Glu Glu Ile Leu Leu Leu Glu Asp 980 985 990 Gln Asn Ser Lys Phe Ile Lys Glu Lys Lys Leu Met Glu Asp Arg Ile 995 1000 1005 Ala Glu Cys Ser Ser Gln Leu Ala Glu Glu Glu Glu Lys Ala Lys 1010 1015 1020 Asn Leu Ala Lys Ile Arg Asn Lys Gln Glu Val Met Ile Ser Asp 1025 1030 1035 Leu Glu Glu Arg Leu Lys Lys Glu Glu Lys Thr Arg Gln Glu Leu 1040 1045 1050 Glu Lys Ala Lys Arg Lys Leu Asp Gly Glu Thr Thr Asp Leu Gln 1055 1060 1065 Asp Gln Ile Ala Glu Leu Gln Ala Gln Ile Asp Glu Leu Lys Leu 1070 1075 1080 Gln Leu Ala Lys Lys Glu Glu Glu Leu Gln Gly Ala Leu Ala Arg 1085 1090 1095 Gly Asp Asp Glu Thr Leu His Lys Asn Asn Ala Leu Lys Val Val 1100 1105 1110 Arg Glu Leu Gln Ala Gln Ile Ala Glu Leu Gln Glu Asp Phe Glu 1115 1120 1125 Ser Glu Lys Ala Ser Arg Asn Lys Ala Glu Lys Gln Lys Arg Asp 1130 1135 1140 Leu Ser Glu Glu Leu Glu Ala Leu Lys Thr Glu Leu Glu Asp Thr 1145 1150 1155 Leu Asp Thr Thr Ala Ala Gln Gln Glu Leu Arg Thr Lys Arg Glu 1160 1165 1170 Gln Glu Val Ala Glu Leu Lys Lys Ala Leu Glu Glu Glu Thr Lys 1175 1180 1185 Asn His Glu Ala Gln Ile Gln Asp Met Arg Gln Arg His Ala Thr 1190 1195 1200 Ala Leu Glu Glu Leu Ser Glu Gln Leu Glu Gln Ala Lys Arg Phe 1205 1210 1215 Lys Ala Asn Leu Glu Lys Asn Lys Gln Gly Leu Glu Thr Asp Asn 1220 1225 1230 Lys Glu Leu Ala Cys Glu Val Lys Val Leu Gln Gln Val Lys Ala 1235 1240 1245 Glu Ser Glu His Lys Arg Lys Lys Leu Asp Ala Gln Val Gln Glu 1250 1255 1260 Leu His Ala Lys Val Ser Glu Gly Asp Arg Leu Arg Val Glu Leu 1265 1270 1275 Ala Glu Lys Ala Ser Lys Leu Gln Asn Glu Leu Asp Asn Val Ser 1280 1285 1290 Thr Leu Leu Glu Glu Ala Glu Lys Lys Gly Ile Lys Phe Ala Lys 1295 1300 1305 Asp Ala Ala Ser Leu Glu Ser Gln Leu Gln Asp Thr Gln Glu Leu 1310 1315 1320 Leu Gln Glu Glu Thr Arg Gln Lys Leu Asn Leu Ser Ser Arg Ile 1325 1330 1335 Arg Gln Leu Glu Glu Glu Lys Asn Ser Leu Gln Glu Gln Gln Glu 1340 1345 1350 Glu Glu Glu Glu Ala Arg Lys Asn Leu Glu Lys Gln Val Leu Ala 1355 1360 1365 Leu Gln Ser Gln Leu Ala Asp Thr Lys Lys Lys Val Asp Asp Asp 1370 1375 1380 Leu Gly Thr Ile Glu Ser Leu Glu Glu Ala Lys Lys Lys Leu Leu 1385 1390 1395 Lys Asp Ala Glu Ala Leu Ser Gln Arg Leu Glu Glu Lys Ala Leu 1400 1405 1410 Ala Tyr Asp Lys Leu Glu Lys Thr Lys Asn Arg Leu Gln Gln Glu 1415 1420 1425 Leu Asp Asp Leu Thr Val Asp Leu Asp His Gln Arg Gln Val Ala 1430 1435 1440 Ser Asn Leu Glu Lys Lys Gln Lys Lys Phe Asp Gln Leu Leu Ala 1445 1450 1455 Glu Glu Lys Ser Ile Ser Ala Arg Tyr Ala Glu Glu Arg Asp Arg 1460 1465 1470 Ala Glu Ala Glu Ala Arg Glu Lys Glu Thr Lys Ala Leu Ser Leu 1475 1480 1485 Ala Arg Ala Leu Glu Glu Ala Leu Glu Ala Lys Glu Glu Phe Glu 1490 1495 1500 Arg Gln Asn Lys Gln Leu Arg Ala Asp Met Glu Asp Leu Met Ser 1505 1510 1515 Ser Lys Asp Asp Val Gly Lys Asn Val His Glu Leu Glu Lys Ser 1520 1525

1530 Lys Arg Ala Leu Glu Gln Gln Val Glu Glu Met Arg Thr Gln Leu 1535 1540 1545 Glu Glu Leu Glu Asp Glu Leu Gln Ala Thr Glu Asp Ala Lys Leu 1550 1555 1560 Arg Leu Glu Val Asn Met Gln Ala Met Lys Ala Gln Phe Glu Arg 1565 1570 1575 Asp Leu Gln Thr Arg Asp Glu Gln Asn Glu Glu Lys Lys Arg Leu 1580 1585 1590 Leu Ile Lys Gln Val Arg Glu Leu Glu Ala Glu Leu Glu Asp Glu 1595 1600 1605 Arg Lys Gln Arg Ala Leu Ala Val Ala Ser Lys Lys Lys Met Glu 1610 1615 1620 Ile Asp Leu Lys Asp Leu Glu Ala Gln Ile Glu Ala Ala Asn Lys 1625 1630 1635 Ala Arg Asp Glu Val Ile Lys Gln Leu Arg Lys Leu Gln Ala Gln 1640 1645 1650 Met Lys Asp Tyr Gln Arg Glu Leu Glu Glu Ala Arg Ala Ser Arg 1655 1660 1665 Asp Glu Ile Phe Ala Gln Ser Lys Glu Ser Glu Lys Lys Leu Lys 1670 1675 1680 Ser Leu Glu Ala Glu Ile Leu Gln Leu Gln Glu Glu Leu Ala Ser 1685 1690 1695 Ser Glu Arg Ala Arg Arg His Ala Glu Gln Glu Arg Asp Glu Leu 1700 1705 1710 Ala Asp Glu Ile Thr Asn Ser Ala Ser Gly Lys Ser Ala Leu Leu 1715 1720 1725 Asp Glu Lys Arg Arg Leu Glu Ala Arg Ile Ala Gln Leu Glu Glu 1730 1735 1740 Glu Leu Glu Glu Glu Gln Ser Asn Met Glu Leu Leu Asn Asp Arg 1745 1750 1755 Phe Arg Lys Thr Thr Leu Gln Val Asp Thr Leu Asn Ala Glu Leu 1760 1765 1770 Ala Ala Glu Arg Ser Ala Ala Gln Lys Ser Asp Asn Ala Arg Gln 1775 1780 1785 Gln Leu Glu Arg Gln Asn Lys Glu Leu Lys Ala Lys Leu Gln Glu 1790 1795 1800 Leu Glu Gly Ala Val Lys Ser Lys Phe Lys Ala Thr Ile Ser Ala 1805 1810 1815 Leu Glu Ala Lys Ile Gly Gln Leu Glu Glu Gln Leu Glu Gln Glu 1820 1825 1830 Ala Lys Glu Arg Ala Ala Ala Asn Lys Leu Val Arg Arg Thr Glu 1835 1840 1845 Lys Lys Leu Lys Glu Ile Phe Met Gln Val Glu Asp Glu Arg Arg 1850 1855 1860 His Ala Asp Gln Tyr Lys Glu Gln Met Glu Lys Ala Asn Ala Arg 1865 1870 1875 Met Lys Gln Leu Lys Arg Gln Leu Glu Glu Ala Glu Glu Glu Ala 1880 1885 1890 Thr Arg Ala Asn Ala Ser Arg Arg Lys Leu Gln Arg Glu Leu Asp 1895 1900 1905 Asp Ala Thr Glu Ala Asn Glu Gly Leu Ser Arg Glu Val Ser Thr 1910 1915 1920 Leu Lys Asn Arg Leu Arg Arg Gly Gly Pro Ile Ser Phe Ser Ser 1925 1930 1935 Ser Arg Ser Gly Arg Arg Gln Leu His Leu Glu Gly Ala Ser Leu 1940 1945 1950 Glu Leu Ser Asp Asp Asp Thr Glu Ser Lys Thr Ser Asp Val Asn 1955 1960 1965 Glu Thr Gln Pro Pro Gln Ser Glu 1970 1975 556442DNAMus musculus 55ccttttctgt ccaggccgag gcctctggac cgccctgggc gccgaccatg gctgcagtga 60ccatgtccgt gtctgggagg aaggtagcct ccaggccagg cccggtgcct gaggcagccc 120aatcgttcct ctacgcgccc cggacgccaa atgtaggtgg ccctggaggg ccacaggtgg 180agtggacagc ccggcgcatg gtgtgggtgc cctcggaact gcatgggttc gaggcagcag 240ccctgcggga tgaaggggag gaggaggcag aagtggagct ggcggagagt gggcgccgcc 300tgcggctgcc cagggaccag atccagcgca tgaacccacc caagttcagc aaggcagaag 360atatggctga gctcacctgc ctcaacgagg cctcggtcct gcacaacctg cgagaacgct 420actactccgg gctcatttat acctactctg gcctcttctg tgtggtcatt aacccataca 480agcagctgcc catctacacg gaggccattg ttgaaatgta ccggggcaag aagcgccatg 540aggtgccacc tcacgtgtat gctgtgacgg agggcgcgta ccgcagcatg cttcaggatc 600gtgaggatca atccattctc tgcacgggag agtctggcgc tgggaagacg gagaacacca 660agaaggtcat ccagtacctg gcccatgtgg catcatctcc aaagggcagg aaggagcctg 720gtgtccctgc ctccgtcagc accatgtctt atggggagct agagcgtcag cttcttcaag 780ccaaccccat cctagaggcc tttggcaatg ccaagacagt gaagaacgac aactcttccc 840gatttggcaa attcatccgc atcaactttg atattgctgg ctacatcgtg ggagcaaaca 900tcgagaccta tctgttggag aagtcccggg ccatcagaca ggccaaggat gaatgcagct 960tccatatctt ctaccagctg ctagggggcg ctggggagca gctaaaagct gacctccttc 1020tggagccctg ttcccattat cgcttcctga ccaatgggcc ctcatcgtcc ccgggccagg 1080agcgtgagtt attccaggag accctggagt ccctgcgtgt gctgggcctc ctcccagaag 1140agatcactgc catgctgcgc actgtctctg ctgtcctcca gtttggcaac attgtcctga 1200agaaagagcg caatacggac caagccacca tgcctgacaa cacagctgcc cagaagcttt 1260gccgcctctt gggactcgga gtgaccgact tctccagagc ccttctcaca ccccgcatca 1320aagtgggccg agattatgtt cagaaagcac aaaccaagga gcaggctgac tttgcgctgg 1380aggctctggc caaagctacc tatgagcgcc tgttccgctg gctggttctg cggctcaacc 1440gtgccctgga cagaagcccg cggcagggtg cctccttcct gggcatcctg gacatcgcgg 1500gctttgagat cttccagctg aactccttcg agcagctgtg catcaactac accaacgaga 1560agctacagca gctattcaac cacaccatgt tcgtgctgga gcaggaggag taccagcgag 1620agggcatccc ctggaccttc ctagacttcg ggttggacct gcaaccttgc atcgacctca 1680ttgagcgtcc ggccaaccct ccaggtctcc tggccctgct ggacgaggag tgctggttcc 1740ccaaggccac ggacaagtct tttgtggaga aggtcgccca ggagcagggc agccacccca 1800aattccagcg ccccaggaac ctgcgagatc aggccgactt cagcgtcctg cactatgccg 1860gcaaggttga ctacaaagcc agtgagtggc tgatgaagaa catggaccca ctgaatgaca 1920atgtggccgc cttgcttcac cagagcacgg atcgtctcac agctgagatc tggaaggatg 1980tggagggcat cgtggggctg gagcaagtaa gcagccttgg agatggccca ccgggaggcc 2040gcccccgccg tggaatgttc cggactgtgg ggcagctcta caaagaatcc ctgagccgcc 2100tcatggccac gctcagcaac accaacccta gttttgtccg ctgcatcgtt cccaatcatg 2160agaagagggc tggaaagctg gagccgcgcc tggtgctgga ccaactccgt tgtaacgggg 2220tcctcgaggg tatacgcatc tgtcgccaag gcttccccaa ccgcatcctc ttccaggagt 2280tccgacagcg ctatgaaatc ctcaccccga acgctattcc caagggcttc atggacggca 2340aacaggcctg tgagaagatg atccaggccc tggagctaga ccccaacctg taccgtgttg 2400gccaaagcaa gatcttcttc cgggcagggg tcctggccca gctggaggag gagcgggacc 2460tgaaagtcac cgacatcata gtgtctttcc aggcagcggc acggggctac ctggcccgta 2520gggctttcca gagacggcag cagcagcaga gtgctctgag ggtgatgcag agaaactgtg 2580ctgcctacct caagctcagg aactggcagt ggtggaggct gttcatcaag gtgaagcccc 2640tgctgcaggt gacacggcag gatgaggtgc tgcaggcgcg cgcccaggag ctgcagaaag 2700ttcaggagct gcagcagcag agcgctcgtg aagtggggga actgcagggt cgagtggcac 2760agctagagga ggagcgcacg cgcctggctg agcagcttcg agcagaagcc gagctctgct 2820ctgaggccga ggagacgcgg gcgcgactgg ctgcccggaa gcaggagctg gagctggtgg 2880tgacagagct ggaggcacga gtgggcgagg aagaagagtg cagccggcag ctgcagagtg 2940agaagaagag gctgcagcag catatccagg agctagagag ccacctggaa gctgaggagg 3000gtgcccggca gaagctacag ctggagaagg tgaccacaga ggccaagatg aagaaatttg 3060aggaggacct gctgctcctg gaggaccaga attccaagct gagcaaggag cggaggctgc 3120tggaggagcg gctggctgag ttctcctcac aggcagcaga agaggaagag aaagtcaaaa 3180gtctcaacaa gctgaggctc aaatatgaag ccacaatctc agacatggaa gaccggctga 3240agaaggagga gaagggacgc caggaactag agaagctgaa gcgacggctg gacggggaga 3300gctcagagct tcaggagcag atggtggagc agaagcagag ggcagaggaa ctgctcgcac 3360agctgggccg caaggaggat gagctgcagg ccgccctgct cagggcagag gaagagggtg 3420gtgcccgtgc ccagttgctc aagtccctgc gagaggcaca ggctggcctt gctgaggctc 3480aggaggacct ggaagctgag cgggtagcca gggccaaggc ggagaagcag cgccgggacc 3540tgggcgagga gttggaggcc ctacgtgggg agctcgagga cactctggat tccaccaacg 3600cccagcagga gctgcggtcc aagagggagc aggaggtgac agagctgaag aaagcattgg 3660aagaggagtc ccgtgcccat gaggtgtcca tgcaggagct gagacagagg catagccagg 3720cactggtgga gatggccgag cagttggagc aagcccggag gggcaaaggt gtgtgggaga 3780agactcggct atccctggag gctgaggtgt ccgagctgaa ggccgagctg agcagcctgc 3840agacctcgag acaggagggt gagcagaaga ggcgccgcct ggagtcccag ctacaggagg 3900tccagggccg atccagtgat tcggagcggg ctcggtctga ggctgctgag aagctgcaga 3960gagcccaggc ggaacttgag agcgtgtcca cagccctgag tgaggcggag tccaaagcca 4020tcaggctggg caaggagctg agcagtgcag agtcccagct gcatgacacc caggaactgc 4080ttcaggagga gaccagggca aagctggcct tggggtcccg tgtgcgtgcc ctagaggccg 4140aggcggcggg gcttcgggag cagatggaag aggaggtggt tgccagggaa cgggctggcc 4200gggagctgca gagcacgcag gcccagctct ctgaatggcg gcgccgccag gaagaagagg 4260ctgcggtgct ggaggctggg gaggaggctc ggcgccgtgc agcccgggag gcagagaccc 4320tgacccagcg cctggcagaa aagactgagg ctgtagaacg actggagcga gcccggcgcc 4380gactgcagca ggagttggac gatgccactg tggatctggg gcagcagaag cagctcctga 4440gcacactgga gaagaagcag cggaaatttg accagctcct ggcagaggag aaggctgcag 4500ttctacgggc tgtggaagac cgtgaacgga tagaggccga aggccgggag cgagaggccc 4560gggccctgtc gctgacccgg gccctggaag aggagcagga ggcccgggag gagctggaga 4620ggcagaaccg tgctctgagg gctgagctgg aagcactgct gagcagcaag gatgacgtgg 4680gcaagaacgt gcacgagctg gagcgagccc gtaaggcggc tgaacaggca gccagtgacc 4740tgcggacaca ggtgacagaa ttggaggatg agctgacagc cgcagaggat gccaagctgc 4800gcctggaggt gactgtgcag gctctgaagg ctcaacatga acgcgacctg cagggccgcg 4860atgatgccgg tgaggagagg cggaggcagc tggccaagca gctaagagac gcagaggtag 4920agcgcgatga ggaacggaag cagagggcac tggctatggc tgcccgcaag aagctggagc 4980tggaactgga ggagttgaag gcgcagacat ctgctgctgg gcagggcaag gaagaggcag 5040tgaagcagct gaagaagatg caggtccaga tgaaggagct gtggcgggag gtagaggaga 5100cgcgtagctc ccgcgacgag atgtttaccc tgagcaggga aaatgagaag aagctcaagg 5160ggctggaagc tgaggtgctg cgtctgcaag aggaacttgc tgcctcagac cgagcccgga 5220ggcaggccca gcaagacaga gacgagatgg cagaggaggt ggccagtggc aatcttagca 5280aggcagccac cctggaggaa aaacggcagc tggaggggcg actgagccag ttggaagagg 5340agctggagga agaacagaac aactcggagc tgctcaagga ccattaccga aagctagtgc 5400tacaggtcga gtccctcacc acagaactgt ctgccgaacg aagtttctca gccaaggccg 5460agagtggacg gcagcagctg gagcggcaga tccaggaact gcgggcccgc ttgggtgaag 5520aggatgctgg agcccgagcc aggcagaaaa tgctgatcgc tgctctggag tctaaactgg 5580cccaggcaga ggagcagctg gagcaggaga gcagggagcg catcctctct ggcaagctgg 5640tacgcagagc tgagaagcgg ctgaaggagg tagttcttca ggtggatgaa gagcgcaggg 5700tggctgacca ggtccgggac cagctggaga aaagcaacct ccggctgaag cagctcaaga 5760ggcagctgga ggaggcagag gaggaggcat ctcgggcaca ggctggtcgg aggcggctgc 5820agcgggagct ggaggacgtc actgagtctg cagaatccat gaaccgggag gtgaccacgc 5880tgaggaacag gctccggcgt ggcccactta cattcaccac acggactgtg cgccaggtgt 5940tccggctgga agagggcgtg gcttctgacg aggaagaggc tgaaggagct gaacctggct 6000ctgcaccagg ccaggagccg gaggctccgc cccctgccac accccaatga tccagtctgt 6060cctagatgcc ccaaggacag agccctttcc agtgcccctc ctggtttgca ctttgaaatg 6120gcactgtcct ctggcacttt ctggcattga tgaaccctcc tgggacccca ggacccctgc 6180ccactggggg ccccaaacca aggagctggg tgggagggag gccatgatgg tctctcttgt 6240tagagaaaca aaattgaacg tggatgtcaa gaatgtcctg tctgcaccta ttttcagcag 6300gcctgtcccc tggagagggc aggcagggtg cttccatccc ctctcagtat cttgccctct 6360tttttggggg gaagtggggt gtctgtgtgc tcatagggta atgctcatgg cccctcatgc 6420tccagacact aaagaaataa aa 6442562000PRTMus musculus 56Met Ala Ala Val Thr Met Ser Val Ser Gly Arg Lys Val Ala Ser Arg 1 5 10 15 Pro Gly Pro Val Pro Glu Ala Ala Gln Ser Phe Leu Tyr Ala Pro Arg 20 25 30 Thr Pro Asn Val Gly Gly Pro Gly Gly Pro Gln Val Glu Trp Thr Ala 35 40 45 Arg Arg Met Val Trp Val Pro Ser Glu Leu His Gly Phe Glu Ala Ala 50 55 60 Ala Leu Arg Asp Glu Gly Glu Glu Glu Ala Glu Val Glu Leu Ala Glu 65 70 75 80 Ser Gly Arg Arg Leu Arg Leu Pro Arg Asp Gln Ile Gln Arg Met Asn 85 90 95 Pro Pro Lys Phe Ser Lys Ala Glu Asp Met Ala Glu Leu Thr Cys Leu 100 105 110 Asn Glu Ala Ser Val Leu His Asn Leu Arg Glu Arg Tyr Tyr Ser Gly 115 120 125 Leu Ile Tyr Thr Tyr Ser Gly Leu Phe Cys Val Val Ile Asn Pro Tyr 130 135 140 Lys Gln Leu Pro Ile Tyr Thr Glu Ala Ile Val Glu Met Tyr Arg Gly 145 150 155 160 Lys Lys Arg His Glu Val Pro Pro His Val Tyr Ala Val Thr Glu Gly 165 170 175 Ala Tyr Arg Ser Met Leu Gln Asp Arg Glu Asp Gln Ser Ile Leu Cys 180 185 190 Thr Gly Glu Ser Gly Ala Gly Lys Thr Glu Asn Thr Lys Lys Val Ile 195 200 205 Gln Tyr Leu Ala His Val Ala Ser Ser Pro Lys Gly Arg Lys Glu Pro 210 215 220 Gly Val Pro Ala Ser Val Ser Thr Met Ser Tyr Gly Glu Leu Glu Arg 225 230 235 240 Gln Leu Leu Gln Ala Asn Pro Ile Leu Glu Ala Phe Gly Asn Ala Lys 245 250 255 Thr Val Lys Asn Asp Asn Ser Ser Arg Phe Gly Lys Phe Ile Arg Ile 260 265 270 Asn Phe Asp Ile Ala Gly Tyr Ile Val Gly Ala Asn Ile Glu Thr Tyr 275 280 285 Leu Leu Glu Lys Ser Arg Ala Ile Arg Gln Ala Lys Asp Glu Cys Ser 290 295 300 Phe His Ile Phe Tyr Gln Leu Leu Gly Gly Ala Gly Glu Gln Leu Lys 305 310 315 320 Ala Asp Leu Leu Leu Glu Pro Cys Ser His Tyr Arg Phe Leu Thr Asn 325 330 335 Gly Pro Ser Ser Ser Pro Gly Gln Glu Arg Glu Leu Phe Gln Glu Thr 340 345 350 Leu Glu Ser Leu Arg Val Leu Gly Leu Leu Pro Glu Glu Ile Thr Ala 355 360 365 Met Leu Arg Thr Val Ser Ala Val Leu Gln Phe Gly Asn Ile Val Leu 370 375 380 Lys Lys Glu Arg Asn Thr Asp Gln Ala Thr Met Pro Asp Asn Thr Ala 385 390 395 400 Ala Gln Lys Leu Cys Arg Leu Leu Gly Leu Gly Val Thr Asp Phe Ser 405 410 415 Arg Ala Leu Leu Thr Pro Arg Ile Lys Val Gly Arg Asp Tyr Val Gln 420 425 430 Lys Ala Gln Thr Lys Glu Gln Ala Asp Phe Ala Leu Glu Ala Leu Ala 435 440 445 Lys Ala Thr Tyr Glu Arg Leu Phe Arg Trp Leu Val Leu Arg Leu Asn 450 455 460 Arg Ala Leu Asp Arg Ser Pro Arg Gln Gly Ala Ser Phe Leu Gly Ile 465 470 475 480 Leu Asp Ile Ala Gly Phe Glu Ile Phe Gln Leu Asn Ser Phe Glu Gln 485 490 495 Leu Cys Ile Asn Tyr Thr Asn Glu Lys Leu Gln Gln Leu Phe Asn His 500 505 510 Thr Met Phe Val Leu Glu Gln Glu Glu Tyr Gln Arg Glu Gly Ile Pro 515 520 525 Trp Thr Phe Leu Asp Phe Gly Leu Asp Leu Gln Pro Cys Ile Asp Leu 530 535 540 Ile Glu Arg Pro Ala Asn Pro Pro Gly Leu Leu Ala Leu Leu Asp Glu 545 550 555 560 Glu Cys Trp Phe Pro Lys Ala Thr Asp Lys Ser Phe Val Glu Lys Val 565 570 575 Ala Gln Glu Gln Gly Ser His Pro Lys Phe Gln Arg Pro Arg Asn Leu 580 585 590 Arg Asp Gln Ala Asp Phe Ser Val Leu His Tyr Ala Gly Lys Val Asp 595 600 605 Tyr Lys Ala Ser Glu Trp Leu Met Lys Asn Met Asp Pro Leu Asn Asp 610 615 620 Asn Val Ala Ala Leu Leu His Gln Ser Thr Asp Arg Leu Thr Ala Glu 625 630 635 640 Ile Trp Lys Asp Val Glu Gly Ile Val Gly Leu Glu Gln Val Ser Ser 645 650 655 Leu Gly Asp Gly Pro Pro Gly Gly Arg Pro Arg Arg Gly Met Phe Arg 660 665 670 Thr Val Gly Gln Leu Tyr Lys Glu Ser Leu Ser Arg Leu Met Ala Thr 675 680 685 Leu Ser Asn Thr Asn Pro Ser Phe Val Arg Cys Ile Val Pro Asn His 690 695 700 Glu Lys Arg Ala Gly Lys Leu Glu Pro Arg Leu Val Leu Asp Gln Leu 705 710 715 720 Arg Cys Asn Gly Val Leu Glu Gly Ile Arg Ile Cys Arg Gln Gly Phe 725 730 735 Pro Asn Arg Ile Leu Phe Gln Glu Phe Arg Gln Arg Tyr Glu Ile Leu 740 745 750 Thr Pro Asn Ala Ile Pro Lys Gly Phe Met Asp Gly Lys Gln Ala Cys 755 760 765 Glu Lys Met Ile Gln Ala Leu Glu Leu Asp Pro Asn Leu Tyr Arg Val 770 775 780 Gly Gln Ser Lys Ile Phe Phe Arg Ala Gly Val Leu Ala Gln Leu Glu 785 790 795 800 Glu Glu Arg Asp Leu Lys Val Thr Asp Ile Ile Val Ser Phe Gln Ala 805 810 815 Ala Ala Arg Gly Tyr Leu Ala Arg Arg Ala Phe Gln Arg Arg Gln Gln 820 825 830 Gln Gln Ser Ala Leu Arg Val Met Gln Arg Asn Cys Ala Ala Tyr

Leu 835 840 845 Lys Leu Arg Asn Trp Gln Trp Trp Arg Leu Phe Ile Lys Val Lys Pro 850 855 860 Leu Leu Gln Val Thr Arg Gln Asp Glu Val Leu Gln Ala Arg Ala Gln 865 870 875 880 Glu Leu Gln Lys Val Gln Glu Leu Gln Gln Gln Ser Ala Arg Glu Val 885 890 895 Gly Glu Leu Gln Gly Arg Val Ala Gln Leu Glu Glu Glu Arg Thr Arg 900 905 910 Leu Ala Glu Gln Leu Arg Ala Glu Ala Glu Leu Cys Ser Glu Ala Glu 915 920 925 Glu Thr Arg Ala Arg Leu Ala Ala Arg Lys Gln Glu Leu Glu Leu Val 930 935 940 Val Thr Glu Leu Glu Ala Arg Val Gly Glu Glu Glu Glu Cys Ser Arg 945 950 955 960 Gln Leu Gln Ser Glu Lys Lys Arg Leu Gln Gln His Ile Gln Glu Leu 965 970 975 Glu Ser His Leu Glu Ala Glu Glu Gly Ala Arg Gln Lys Leu Gln Leu 980 985 990 Glu Lys Val Thr Thr Glu Ala Lys Met Lys Lys Phe Glu Glu Asp Leu 995 1000 1005 Leu Leu Leu Glu Asp Gln Asn Ser Lys Leu Ser Lys Glu Arg Arg 1010 1015 1020 Leu Leu Glu Glu Arg Leu Ala Glu Phe Ser Ser Gln Ala Ala Glu 1025 1030 1035 Glu Glu Glu Lys Val Lys Ser Leu Asn Lys Leu Arg Leu Lys Tyr 1040 1045 1050 Glu Ala Thr Ile Ser Asp Met Glu Asp Arg Leu Lys Lys Glu Glu 1055 1060 1065 Lys Gly Arg Gln Glu Leu Glu Lys Leu Lys Arg Arg Leu Asp Gly 1070 1075 1080 Glu Ser Ser Glu Leu Gln Glu Gln Met Val Glu Gln Lys Gln Arg 1085 1090 1095 Ala Glu Glu Leu Leu Ala Gln Leu Gly Arg Lys Glu Asp Glu Leu 1100 1105 1110 Gln Ala Ala Leu Leu Arg Ala Glu Glu Glu Gly Gly Ala Arg Ala 1115 1120 1125 Gln Leu Leu Lys Ser Leu Arg Glu Ala Gln Ala Gly Leu Ala Glu 1130 1135 1140 Ala Gln Glu Asp Leu Glu Ala Glu Arg Val Ala Arg Ala Lys Ala 1145 1150 1155 Glu Lys Gln Arg Arg Asp Leu Gly Glu Glu Leu Glu Ala Leu Arg 1160 1165 1170 Gly Glu Leu Glu Asp Thr Leu Asp Ser Thr Asn Ala Gln Gln Glu 1175 1180 1185 Leu Arg Ser Lys Arg Glu Gln Glu Val Thr Glu Leu Lys Lys Ala 1190 1195 1200 Leu Glu Glu Glu Ser Arg Ala His Glu Val Ser Met Gln Glu Leu 1205 1210 1215 Arg Gln Arg His Ser Gln Ala Leu Val Glu Met Ala Glu Gln Leu 1220 1225 1230 Glu Gln Ala Arg Arg Gly Lys Gly Val Trp Glu Lys Thr Arg Leu 1235 1240 1245 Ser Leu Glu Ala Glu Val Ser Glu Leu Lys Ala Glu Leu Ser Ser 1250 1255 1260 Leu Gln Thr Ser Arg Gln Glu Gly Glu Gln Lys Arg Arg Arg Leu 1265 1270 1275 Glu Ser Gln Leu Gln Glu Val Gln Gly Arg Ser Ser Asp Ser Glu 1280 1285 1290 Arg Ala Arg Ser Glu Ala Ala Glu Lys Leu Gln Arg Ala Gln Ala 1295 1300 1305 Glu Leu Glu Ser Val Ser Thr Ala Leu Ser Glu Ala Glu Ser Lys 1310 1315 1320 Ala Ile Arg Leu Gly Lys Glu Leu Ser Ser Ala Glu Ser Gln Leu 1325 1330 1335 His Asp Thr Gln Glu Leu Leu Gln Glu Glu Thr Arg Ala Lys Leu 1340 1345 1350 Ala Leu Gly Ser Arg Val Arg Ala Leu Glu Ala Glu Ala Ala Gly 1355 1360 1365 Leu Arg Glu Gln Met Glu Glu Glu Val Val Ala Arg Glu Arg Ala 1370 1375 1380 Gly Arg Glu Leu Gln Ser Thr Gln Ala Gln Leu Ser Glu Trp Arg 1385 1390 1395 Arg Arg Gln Glu Glu Glu Ala Ala Val Leu Glu Ala Gly Glu Glu 1400 1405 1410 Ala Arg Arg Arg Ala Ala Arg Glu Ala Glu Thr Leu Thr Gln Arg 1415 1420 1425 Leu Ala Glu Lys Thr Glu Ala Val Glu Arg Leu Glu Arg Ala Arg 1430 1435 1440 Arg Arg Leu Gln Gln Glu Leu Asp Asp Ala Thr Val Asp Leu Gly 1445 1450 1455 Gln Gln Lys Gln Leu Leu Ser Thr Leu Glu Lys Lys Gln Arg Lys 1460 1465 1470 Phe Asp Gln Leu Leu Ala Glu Glu Lys Ala Ala Val Leu Arg Ala 1475 1480 1485 Val Glu Asp Arg Glu Arg Ile Glu Ala Glu Gly Arg Glu Arg Glu 1490 1495 1500 Ala Arg Ala Leu Ser Leu Thr Arg Ala Leu Glu Glu Glu Gln Glu 1505 1510 1515 Ala Arg Glu Glu Leu Glu Arg Gln Asn Arg Ala Leu Arg Ala Glu 1520 1525 1530 Leu Glu Ala Leu Leu Ser Ser Lys Asp Asp Val Gly Lys Asn Val 1535 1540 1545 His Glu Leu Glu Arg Ala Arg Lys Ala Ala Glu Gln Ala Ala Ser 1550 1555 1560 Asp Leu Arg Thr Gln Val Thr Glu Leu Glu Asp Glu Leu Thr Ala 1565 1570 1575 Ala Glu Asp Ala Lys Leu Arg Leu Glu Val Thr Val Gln Ala Leu 1580 1585 1590 Lys Ala Gln His Glu Arg Asp Leu Gln Gly Arg Asp Asp Ala Gly 1595 1600 1605 Glu Glu Arg Arg Arg Gln Leu Ala Lys Gln Leu Arg Asp Ala Glu 1610 1615 1620 Val Glu Arg Asp Glu Glu Arg Lys Gln Arg Ala Leu Ala Met Ala 1625 1630 1635 Ala Arg Lys Lys Leu Glu Leu Glu Leu Glu Glu Leu Lys Ala Gln 1640 1645 1650 Thr Ser Ala Ala Gly Gln Gly Lys Glu Glu Ala Val Lys Gln Leu 1655 1660 1665 Lys Lys Met Gln Val Gln Met Lys Glu Leu Trp Arg Glu Val Glu 1670 1675 1680 Glu Thr Arg Ser Ser Arg Asp Glu Met Phe Thr Leu Ser Arg Glu 1685 1690 1695 Asn Glu Lys Lys Leu Lys Gly Leu Glu Ala Glu Val Leu Arg Leu 1700 1705 1710 Gln Glu Glu Leu Ala Ala Ser Asp Arg Ala Arg Arg Gln Ala Gln 1715 1720 1725 Gln Asp Arg Asp Glu Met Ala Glu Glu Val Ala Ser Gly Asn Leu 1730 1735 1740 Ser Lys Ala Ala Thr Leu Glu Glu Lys Arg Gln Leu Glu Gly Arg 1745 1750 1755 Leu Ser Gln Leu Glu Glu Glu Leu Glu Glu Glu Gln Asn Asn Ser 1760 1765 1770 Glu Leu Leu Lys Asp His Tyr Arg Lys Leu Val Leu Gln Val Glu 1775 1780 1785 Ser Leu Thr Thr Glu Leu Ser Ala Glu Arg Ser Phe Ser Ala Lys 1790 1795 1800 Ala Glu Ser Gly Arg Gln Gln Leu Glu Arg Gln Ile Gln Glu Leu 1805 1810 1815 Arg Ala Arg Leu Gly Glu Glu Asp Ala Gly Ala Arg Ala Arg Gln 1820 1825 1830 Lys Met Leu Ile Ala Ala Leu Glu Ser Lys Leu Ala Gln Ala Glu 1835 1840 1845 Glu Gln Leu Glu Gln Glu Ser Arg Glu Arg Ile Leu Ser Gly Lys 1850 1855 1860 Leu Val Arg Arg Ala Glu Lys Arg Leu Lys Glu Val Val Leu Gln 1865 1870 1875 Val Asp Glu Glu Arg Arg Val Ala Asp Gln Val Arg Asp Gln Leu 1880 1885 1890 Glu Lys Ser Asn Leu Arg Leu Lys Gln Leu Lys Arg Gln Leu Glu 1895 1900 1905 Glu Ala Glu Glu Glu Ala Ser Arg Ala Gln Ala Gly Arg Arg Arg 1910 1915 1920 Leu Gln Arg Glu Leu Glu Asp Val Thr Glu Ser Ala Glu Ser Met 1925 1930 1935 Asn Arg Glu Val Thr Thr Leu Arg Asn Arg Leu Arg Arg Gly Pro 1940 1945 1950 Leu Thr Phe Thr Thr Arg Thr Val Arg Gln Val Phe Arg Leu Glu 1955 1960 1965 Glu Gly Val Ala Ser Asp Glu Glu Glu Ala Glu Gly Ala Glu Pro 1970 1975 1980 Gly Ser Ala Pro Gly Gln Glu Pro Glu Ala Pro Pro Pro Ala Thr 1985 1990 1995 Pro Gln 2000 576377DNAMus musculus 57ccgaccatgg ctgcagtgac catgtccgtg tctgggagga aggtagcctc caggccaggc 60ccggtgcctg aggcagccca atcgttcctc tacgcgcccc ggacgccaaa tgtaggtggc 120cctggagggc cacaggtgga gtggacagcc cggcgcatgg tgtgggtgcc ctcggaactg 180catgggttcg aggcagcagc cctgcgggat gaaggggagg aggaggcaga agtggagctg 240gcggagagtg ggcgccgcct gcggctgccc agggaccaga tccagcgcat gaacccaccc 300aagttcagca aggcagaaga tatggctgag ctcacctgcc tcaacgaggc ctcggtcctg 360cacaacctgc gagaacgcta ctactccggg ctcatttata cctactctgg cctcttctgt 420gtggtcatta acccatacaa gcagctgccc atctacacgg aggccattgt tgaaatgtac 480cggggcaaga agcgccatga ggtgccacct cacgtgtatg ctgtgacgga gggcgcgtac 540cgcagcatgc ttcaggatcg tgaggatcaa tccattctct gcacgggaga gtctggcgct 600gggaagacgg agaacaccaa gaaggtcatc cagtacctgg cccatgtggc atcatctcca 660aagggcagga aggagcctgg tgtccctggg gagctagagc gtcagcttct tcaagccaac 720cccatcctag aggcctttgg caatgccaag acagtgaaga acgacaactc ttcccgattt 780ggcaaattca tccgcatcaa ctttgatatt gctggctaca tcgtgggagc aaacatcgag 840acctatctgt tggagaagtc ccgggccatc agacaggcca aggatgaatg cagcttccat 900atcttctacc agctgctagg gggcgctggg gagcagctaa aagctgacct ccttctggag 960ccctgttccc attatcgctt cctgaccaat gggccctcat cgtccccggg ccaggagcgt 1020gagttattcc aggagaccct ggagtccctg cgtgtgctgg gcctcctccc agaagagatc 1080actgccatgc tgcgcactgt ctctgctgtc ctccagtttg gcaacattgt cctgaagaaa 1140gagcgcaata cggaccaagc caccatgcct gacaacacag ctgcccagaa gctttgccgc 1200ctcttgggac tcggagtgac cgacttctcc agagcccttc tcacaccccg catcaaagtg 1260ggccgagatt atgttcagaa agcacaaacc aaggagcagg ctgactttgc gctggaggct 1320ctggccaaag ctacctatga gcgcctgttc cgctggctgg ttctgcggct caaccgtgcc 1380ctggacagaa gcccgcggca gggtgcctcc ttcctgggca tcctggacat cgcgggcttt 1440gagatcttcc agctgaactc cttcgagcag ctgtgcatca actacaccaa cgagaagcta 1500cagcagctat tcaaccacac catgttcgtg ctggagcagg aggagtacca gcgagagggc 1560atcccctgga ccttcctaga cttcgggttg gacctgcaac cttgcatcga cctcattgag 1620cgtccggcca accctccagg tctcctggcc ctgctggacg aggagtgctg gttccccaag 1680gccacggaca agtcttttgt ggagaaggtc gcccaggagc agggcagcca ccccaaattc 1740cagcgcccca ggaacctgcg agatcaggcc gacttcagcg tcctgcacta tgccggcaag 1800gttgactaca aagccagtga gtggctgatg aagaacatgg acccactgaa tgacaatgtg 1860gccgccttgc ttcaccagag cacggatcgt ctcacagctg agatctggaa ggatgtggag 1920ggcatcgtgg ggctggagca agtaagcagc cttggagatg gcccaccggg aggccgcccc 1980cgccgtggaa tgttccggac tgtggggcag ctctacaaag aatccctgag ccgcctcatg 2040gccacgctca gcaacaccaa ccctagtttt gtccgctgca tcgttcccaa tcatgagaag 2100agggctggaa agctggagcc gcgcctggtg ctggaccaac tccgttgtaa cggggtcctc 2160gagggtatac gcatctgtcg ccaaggcttc cccaaccgca tcctcttcca ggagttccga 2220cagcgctatg aaatcctcac cccgaacgct attcccaagg gcttcatgga cggcaaacag 2280gcctgtgaga agatgatcca ggccctggag ctagacccca acctgtaccg tgttggccaa 2340agcaagatct tcttccgggc aggggtcctg gcccagctgg aggaggagcg ggacctgaaa 2400gtcaccgaca tcatagtgtc tttccaggca gcggcacggg gctacctggc ccgtagggct 2460ttccagagac ggcagcagca gcagagtgct ctgagggtga tgcagagaaa ctgtgctgcc 2520tacctcaagc tcaggaactg gcagtggtgg aggctgttca tcaaggtgaa gcccctgctg 2580caggtgacac ggcaggatga ggtgctgcag gcgcgcgccc aggagctgca gaaagttcag 2640gagctgcagc agcagagcgc tcgtgaagtg ggggaactgc agggtcgagt ggcacagcta 2700gaggaggagc gcacgcgcct ggctgagcag cttcgagcag aagccgagct ctgctctgag 2760gccgaggaga cgcgggcgcg actggctgcc cggaagcagg agctggagct ggtggtgaca 2820gagctggagg cacgagtggg cgaggaagaa gagtgcagcc ggcagctgca gagtgagaag 2880aagaggctgc agcagcatat ccaggagcta gagagccacc tggaagctga ggagggtgcc 2940cggcagaagc tacagctgga gaaggtgacc acagaggcca agatgaagaa atttgaggag 3000gacctgctgc tcctggagga ccagaattcc aagctgagca aggagcggag gctgctggag 3060gagcggctgg ctgagttctc ctcacaggca gcagaagagg aagagaaagt caaaagtctc 3120aacaagctga ggctcaaata tgaagccaca atctcagaca tggaagaccg gctgaagaag 3180gaggagaagg gacgccagga actagagaag ctgaagcgac ggctggacgg ggagagctca 3240gagcttcagg agcagatggt ggagcagaag cagagggcag aggaactgct cgcacagctg 3300ggccgcaagg aggatgagct gcaggccgcc ctgctcaggg cagaggaaga gggtggtgcc 3360cgtgcccagt tgctcaagtc cctgcgagag gcacaggctg gccttgctga ggctcaggag 3420gacctggaag ctgagcgggt agccagggcc aaggcggaga agcagcgccg ggacctgggc 3480gaggagttgg aggccctacg tggggagctc gaggacactc tggattccac caacgcccag 3540caggagctgc ggtccaagag ggagcaggag gtgacagagc tgaagaaagc attggaagag 3600gagtcccgtg cccatgaggt gtccatgcag gagctgagac agaggcatag ccaggcactg 3660gtggagatgg ccgagcagtt ggagcaagcc cggaggggca aaggtgtgtg ggagaagact 3720cggctatccc tggaggctga ggtgtccgag ctgaaggccg agctgagcag cctgcagacc 3780tcgagacagg agggtgagca gaagaggcgc cgcctggagt cccagctaca ggaggtccag 3840ggccgatcca gtgattcgga gcgggctcgg tctgaggctg ctgagaagct gcagagagcc 3900caggcggaac ttgagagcgt gtccacagcc ctgagtgagg cggagtccaa agccatcagg 3960ctgggcaagg agctgagcag tgcagagtcc cagctgcatg acacccagga actgcttcag 4020gaggagacca gggcaaagct ggccttgggg tcccgtgtgc gtgccctaga ggccgaggcg 4080gcggggcttc gggagcagat ggaagaggag gtggttgcca gggaacgggc tggccgggag 4140ctgcagagca cgcaggccca gctctctgaa tggcggcgcc gccaggaaga agaggccgcg 4200gtgctggagg ctggggagga ggctcggcgc cgtgcagccc gggaggcaga gaccctgacc 4260cagcgcctgg cagaaaagac tgaggctgta gaacgactgg agcgagcccg gcgccgactg 4320cagcaggagt tggacgatgc cactgtggat ctggggcagc agaagcagct cctgagcaca 4380ctggagaaga agcagcggaa atttgaccag ctcctggcag aggagaaggc tgcagttcta 4440cgggctgtgg aagaccgtga acggatagag gccgaaggcc gggagcgaga ggcccgggcc 4500ctgtcgctga cccgggccct ggaagaggag caggaggccc gggaggagct ggagaggcag 4560aaccgtgctc tgagggctga gctggaagca ctgctgagca gcaaggatga cgtgggcaag 4620aacgtgcacg agctggagcg agcccgtaag gcggctgaac aggcagccag tgacctgcgg 4680acacaggtga cagaattgga ggatgagctg acagccgcag aggatgccaa gctgcgcctg 4740gaggtgactg tgcaggctct gaaggctcaa catgaacgcg acctgcaggg ccgcgatgat 4800gccggtgagg agaggcggag gcagctggcc aagcagctaa gagacgcaga ggtagagcgc 4860gatgaggaac ggaagcagag ggcactggct atggctgccc gcaagaagct ggagctggaa 4920ctggaggagt tgaaggcgca gacatctgct gctgggcagg gcaaggaaga ggcagtgaag 4980cagctgaaga agatgcaggt ccagatgaag gagctgtggc gggaggtaga ggagacgcgt 5040agctcccgcg acgagatgtt taccctgagc agggaaaatg agaagaagct caaggggctg 5100gaagctgagg tgctgcgtct gcaagaggaa cttgctgcct cagaccgagc ccggaggcag 5160gcccagcaag acagagacga gatggcagag gaggtggcca gtggcaatct tagcaaggca 5220gccaccctgg aggaaaaacg gcagctggag gggcgactga gccagttgga agaggagctg 5280gaggaagaac agaacaactc ggagctgctc aaggaccatt accgaaagct agtgctacag 5340gtcgagtccc tcaccacaga actgtctgcc gaacgaagtt tctcagccaa ggccgagagt 5400ggacggcagc agctggagcg gcagatccag gaactgcggg cccgcttggg tgaagaggat 5460gctggagccc gagccaggca gaaaatgctg atcgctgctc tggagtctaa actggcccag 5520gcagaggagc agctggagca ggagagcagg gagcgcatcc tctctggcaa gctggtacgc 5580agagctgaga agcggctgaa ggaggtagtt cttcaggtgg atgaagagcg cagggtggct 5640gaccaggtcc gggaccagct ggagaaaagc aacctccggc tgaagcagct caagaggcag 5700ctggaggagg cagaggagga ggcatctcgg gcacaggctg gtcggaggcg gctgcagcgg 5760gagctggagg acgtcactga gtctgcagaa tccatgaacc gggaggtgac cacgctgagg 5820aacaggctcc ggcgtggccc acttacattc accacacgga ctgtgcgcca ggtgttccgg 5880ctggaagagg gcgtggcttc tgacgaggaa gaggctgaag gagctgaacc tggctctgca 5940ccaggccagg agccggaggc tccgccccct gccacacccc aatgatccag tctgtcctag 6000atgccccaag gacagagccc tttccagtgc ccctcctggt ttgcactttg aaatggcact 6060gtcctctggc actttctggc attgatgaac cctcctggga ccccaggacc cctgcccact 6120gggggcccca aaccaaggag ctgggtggga gggaggccat gatggtctct cttgttagag 6180aaacaaaatt gaacgtggat gtcaagaatg tcctgtctgc acctattttc agcaggcctg 6240tcccctggag agggcaggca gggtgcttcc atcccctctc agtatcttgc cctctttttt 6300ggggggaagt ggggtgtctg tgtgctcata gggtaatgct catggcccct catgctccag 6360acactaaaga aataaaa 6377581992PRTMus musculus 58Met Ala Ala Val Thr Met Ser Val Ser Gly Arg Lys Val Ala Ser Arg 1 5 10 15 Pro Gly Pro Val Pro Glu Ala Ala Gln Ser Phe Leu Tyr Ala Pro Arg 20 25 30 Thr Pro Asn Val Gly Gly Pro Gly Gly Pro Gln Val Glu Trp Thr Ala 35 40 45 Arg Arg Met Val Trp Val Pro Ser Glu Leu His Gly Phe Glu Ala Ala 50 55 60 Ala Leu Arg Asp Glu Gly Glu Glu Glu Ala Glu Val Glu Leu Ala Glu 65 70 75 80 Ser Gly Arg Arg Leu Arg Leu Pro Arg Asp Gln Ile Gln Arg Met Asn 85 90 95 Pro Pro Lys Phe Ser Lys Ala Glu Asp Met Ala Glu Leu Thr Cys Leu

100 105 110 Asn Glu Ala Ser Val Leu His Asn Leu Arg Glu Arg Tyr Tyr Ser Gly 115 120 125 Leu Ile Tyr Thr Tyr Ser Gly Leu Phe Cys Val Val Ile Asn Pro Tyr 130 135 140 Lys Gln Leu Pro Ile Tyr Thr Glu Ala Ile Val Glu Met Tyr Arg Gly 145 150 155 160 Lys Lys Arg His Glu Val Pro Pro His Val Tyr Ala Val Thr Glu Gly 165 170 175 Ala Tyr Arg Ser Met Leu Gln Asp Arg Glu Asp Gln Ser Ile Leu Cys 180 185 190 Thr Gly Glu Ser Gly Ala Gly Lys Thr Glu Asn Thr Lys Lys Val Ile 195 200 205 Gln Tyr Leu Ala His Val Ala Ser Ser Pro Lys Gly Arg Lys Glu Pro 210 215 220 Gly Val Pro Gly Glu Leu Glu Arg Gln Leu Leu Gln Ala Asn Pro Ile 225 230 235 240 Leu Glu Ala Phe Gly Asn Ala Lys Thr Val Lys Asn Asp Asn Ser Ser 245 250 255 Arg Phe Gly Lys Phe Ile Arg Ile Asn Phe Asp Ile Ala Gly Tyr Ile 260 265 270 Val Gly Ala Asn Ile Glu Thr Tyr Leu Leu Glu Lys Ser Arg Ala Ile 275 280 285 Arg Gln Ala Lys Asp Glu Cys Ser Phe His Ile Phe Tyr Gln Leu Leu 290 295 300 Gly Gly Ala Gly Glu Gln Leu Lys Ala Asp Leu Leu Leu Glu Pro Cys 305 310 315 320 Ser His Tyr Arg Phe Leu Thr Asn Gly Pro Ser Ser Ser Pro Gly Gln 325 330 335 Glu Arg Glu Leu Phe Gln Glu Thr Leu Glu Ser Leu Arg Val Leu Gly 340 345 350 Leu Leu Pro Glu Glu Ile Thr Ala Met Leu Arg Thr Val Ser Ala Val 355 360 365 Leu Gln Phe Gly Asn Ile Val Leu Lys Lys Glu Arg Asn Thr Asp Gln 370 375 380 Ala Thr Met Pro Asp Asn Thr Ala Ala Gln Lys Leu Cys Arg Leu Leu 385 390 395 400 Gly Leu Gly Val Thr Asp Phe Ser Arg Ala Leu Leu Thr Pro Arg Ile 405 410 415 Lys Val Gly Arg Asp Tyr Val Gln Lys Ala Gln Thr Lys Glu Gln Ala 420 425 430 Asp Phe Ala Leu Glu Ala Leu Ala Lys Ala Thr Tyr Glu Arg Leu Phe 435 440 445 Arg Trp Leu Val Leu Arg Leu Asn Arg Ala Leu Asp Arg Ser Pro Arg 450 455 460 Gln Gly Ala Ser Phe Leu Gly Ile Leu Asp Ile Ala Gly Phe Glu Ile 465 470 475 480 Phe Gln Leu Asn Ser Phe Glu Gln Leu Cys Ile Asn Tyr Thr Asn Glu 485 490 495 Lys Leu Gln Gln Leu Phe Asn His Thr Met Phe Val Leu Glu Gln Glu 500 505 510 Glu Tyr Gln Arg Glu Gly Ile Pro Trp Thr Phe Leu Asp Phe Gly Leu 515 520 525 Asp Leu Gln Pro Cys Ile Asp Leu Ile Glu Arg Pro Ala Asn Pro Pro 530 535 540 Gly Leu Leu Ala Leu Leu Asp Glu Glu Cys Trp Phe Pro Lys Ala Thr 545 550 555 560 Asp Lys Ser Phe Val Glu Lys Val Ala Gln Glu Gln Gly Ser His Pro 565 570 575 Lys Phe Gln Arg Pro Arg Asn Leu Arg Asp Gln Ala Asp Phe Ser Val 580 585 590 Leu His Tyr Ala Gly Lys Val Asp Tyr Lys Ala Ser Glu Trp Leu Met 595 600 605 Lys Asn Met Asp Pro Leu Asn Asp Asn Val Ala Ala Leu Leu His Gln 610 615 620 Ser Thr Asp Arg Leu Thr Ala Glu Ile Trp Lys Asp Val Glu Gly Ile 625 630 635 640 Val Gly Leu Glu Gln Val Ser Ser Leu Gly Asp Gly Pro Pro Gly Gly 645 650 655 Arg Pro Arg Arg Gly Met Phe Arg Thr Val Gly Gln Leu Tyr Lys Glu 660 665 670 Ser Leu Ser Arg Leu Met Ala Thr Leu Ser Asn Thr Asn Pro Ser Phe 675 680 685 Val Arg Cys Ile Val Pro Asn His Glu Lys Arg Ala Gly Lys Leu Glu 690 695 700 Pro Arg Leu Val Leu Asp Gln Leu Arg Cys Asn Gly Val Leu Glu Gly 705 710 715 720 Ile Arg Ile Cys Arg Gln Gly Phe Pro Asn Arg Ile Leu Phe Gln Glu 725 730 735 Phe Arg Gln Arg Tyr Glu Ile Leu Thr Pro Asn Ala Ile Pro Lys Gly 740 745 750 Phe Met Asp Gly Lys Gln Ala Cys Glu Lys Met Ile Gln Ala Leu Glu 755 760 765 Leu Asp Pro Asn Leu Tyr Arg Val Gly Gln Ser Lys Ile Phe Phe Arg 770 775 780 Ala Gly Val Leu Ala Gln Leu Glu Glu Glu Arg Asp Leu Lys Val Thr 785 790 795 800 Asp Ile Ile Val Ser Phe Gln Ala Ala Ala Arg Gly Tyr Leu Ala Arg 805 810 815 Arg Ala Phe Gln Arg Arg Gln Gln Gln Gln Ser Ala Leu Arg Val Met 820 825 830 Gln Arg Asn Cys Ala Ala Tyr Leu Lys Leu Arg Asn Trp Gln Trp Trp 835 840 845 Arg Leu Phe Ile Lys Val Lys Pro Leu Leu Gln Val Thr Arg Gln Asp 850 855 860 Glu Val Leu Gln Ala Arg Ala Gln Glu Leu Gln Lys Val Gln Glu Leu 865 870 875 880 Gln Gln Gln Ser Ala Arg Glu Val Gly Glu Leu Gln Gly Arg Val Ala 885 890 895 Gln Leu Glu Glu Glu Arg Thr Arg Leu Ala Glu Gln Leu Arg Ala Glu 900 905 910 Ala Glu Leu Cys Ser Glu Ala Glu Glu Thr Arg Ala Arg Leu Ala Ala 915 920 925 Arg Lys Gln Glu Leu Glu Leu Val Val Thr Glu Leu Glu Ala Arg Val 930 935 940 Gly Glu Glu Glu Glu Cys Ser Arg Gln Leu Gln Ser Glu Lys Lys Arg 945 950 955 960 Leu Gln Gln His Ile Gln Glu Leu Glu Ser His Leu Glu Ala Glu Glu 965 970 975 Gly Ala Arg Gln Lys Leu Gln Leu Glu Lys Val Thr Thr Glu Ala Lys 980 985 990 Met Lys Lys Phe Glu Glu Asp Leu Leu Leu Leu Glu Asp Gln Asn Ser 995 1000 1005 Lys Leu Ser Lys Glu Arg Arg Leu Leu Glu Glu Arg Leu Ala Glu 1010 1015 1020 Phe Ser Ser Gln Ala Ala Glu Glu Glu Glu Lys Val Lys Ser Leu 1025 1030 1035 Asn Lys Leu Arg Leu Lys Tyr Glu Ala Thr Ile Ser Asp Met Glu 1040 1045 1050 Asp Arg Leu Lys Lys Glu Glu Lys Gly Arg Gln Glu Leu Glu Lys 1055 1060 1065 Leu Lys Arg Arg Leu Asp Gly Glu Ser Ser Glu Leu Gln Glu Gln 1070 1075 1080 Met Val Glu Gln Lys Gln Arg Ala Glu Glu Leu Leu Ala Gln Leu 1085 1090 1095 Gly Arg Lys Glu Asp Glu Leu Gln Ala Ala Leu Leu Arg Ala Glu 1100 1105 1110 Glu Glu Gly Gly Ala Arg Ala Gln Leu Leu Lys Ser Leu Arg Glu 1115 1120 1125 Ala Gln Ala Gly Leu Ala Glu Ala Gln Glu Asp Leu Glu Ala Glu 1130 1135 1140 Arg Val Ala Arg Ala Lys Ala Glu Lys Gln Arg Arg Asp Leu Gly 1145 1150 1155 Glu Glu Leu Glu Ala Leu Arg Gly Glu Leu Glu Asp Thr Leu Asp 1160 1165 1170 Ser Thr Asn Ala Gln Gln Glu Leu Arg Ser Lys Arg Glu Gln Glu 1175 1180 1185 Val Thr Glu Leu Lys Lys Ala Leu Glu Glu Glu Ser Arg Ala His 1190 1195 1200 Glu Val Ser Met Gln Glu Leu Arg Gln Arg His Ser Gln Ala Leu 1205 1210 1215 Val Glu Met Ala Glu Gln Leu Glu Gln Ala Arg Arg Gly Lys Gly 1220 1225 1230 Val Trp Glu Lys Thr Arg Leu Ser Leu Glu Ala Glu Val Ser Glu 1235 1240 1245 Leu Lys Ala Glu Leu Ser Ser Leu Gln Thr Ser Arg Gln Glu Gly 1250 1255 1260 Glu Gln Lys Arg Arg Arg Leu Glu Ser Gln Leu Gln Glu Val Gln 1265 1270 1275 Gly Arg Ser Ser Asp Ser Glu Arg Ala Arg Ser Glu Ala Ala Glu 1280 1285 1290 Lys Leu Gln Arg Ala Gln Ala Glu Leu Glu Ser Val Ser Thr Ala 1295 1300 1305 Leu Ser Glu Ala Glu Ser Lys Ala Ile Arg Leu Gly Lys Glu Leu 1310 1315 1320 Ser Ser Ala Glu Ser Gln Leu His Asp Thr Gln Glu Leu Leu Gln 1325 1330 1335 Glu Glu Thr Arg Ala Lys Leu Ala Leu Gly Ser Arg Val Arg Ala 1340 1345 1350 Leu Glu Ala Glu Ala Ala Gly Leu Arg Glu Gln Met Glu Glu Glu 1355 1360 1365 Val Val Ala Arg Glu Arg Ala Gly Arg Glu Leu Gln Ser Thr Gln 1370 1375 1380 Ala Gln Leu Ser Glu Trp Arg Arg Arg Gln Glu Glu Glu Ala Ala 1385 1390 1395 Val Leu Glu Ala Gly Glu Glu Ala Arg Arg Arg Ala Ala Arg Glu 1400 1405 1410 Ala Glu Thr Leu Thr Gln Arg Leu Ala Glu Lys Thr Glu Ala Val 1415 1420 1425 Glu Arg Leu Glu Arg Ala Arg Arg Arg Leu Gln Gln Glu Leu Asp 1430 1435 1440 Asp Ala Thr Val Asp Leu Gly Gln Gln Lys Gln Leu Leu Ser Thr 1445 1450 1455 Leu Glu Lys Lys Gln Arg Lys Phe Asp Gln Leu Leu Ala Glu Glu 1460 1465 1470 Lys Ala Ala Val Leu Arg Ala Val Glu Asp Arg Glu Arg Ile Glu 1475 1480 1485 Ala Glu Gly Arg Glu Arg Glu Ala Arg Ala Leu Ser Leu Thr Arg 1490 1495 1500 Ala Leu Glu Glu Glu Gln Glu Ala Arg Glu Glu Leu Glu Arg Gln 1505 1510 1515 Asn Arg Ala Leu Arg Ala Glu Leu Glu Ala Leu Leu Ser Ser Lys 1520 1525 1530 Asp Asp Val Gly Lys Asn Val His Glu Leu Glu Arg Ala Arg Lys 1535 1540 1545 Ala Ala Glu Gln Ala Ala Ser Asp Leu Arg Thr Gln Val Thr Glu 1550 1555 1560 Leu Glu Asp Glu Leu Thr Ala Ala Glu Asp Ala Lys Leu Arg Leu 1565 1570 1575 Glu Val Thr Val Gln Ala Leu Lys Ala Gln His Glu Arg Asp Leu 1580 1585 1590 Gln Gly Arg Asp Asp Ala Gly Glu Glu Arg Arg Arg Gln Leu Ala 1595 1600 1605 Lys Gln Leu Arg Asp Ala Glu Val Glu Arg Asp Glu Glu Arg Lys 1610 1615 1620 Gln Arg Ala Leu Ala Met Ala Ala Arg Lys Lys Leu Glu Leu Glu 1625 1630 1635 Leu Glu Glu Leu Lys Ala Gln Thr Ser Ala Ala Gly Gln Gly Lys 1640 1645 1650 Glu Glu Ala Val Lys Gln Leu Lys Lys Met Gln Val Gln Met Lys 1655 1660 1665 Glu Leu Trp Arg Glu Val Glu Glu Thr Arg Ser Ser Arg Asp Glu 1670 1675 1680 Met Phe Thr Leu Ser Arg Glu Asn Glu Lys Lys Leu Lys Gly Leu 1685 1690 1695 Glu Ala Glu Val Leu Arg Leu Gln Glu Glu Leu Ala Ala Ser Asp 1700 1705 1710 Arg Ala Arg Arg Gln Ala Gln Gln Asp Arg Asp Glu Met Ala Glu 1715 1720 1725 Glu Val Ala Ser Gly Asn Leu Ser Lys Ala Ala Thr Leu Glu Glu 1730 1735 1740 Lys Arg Gln Leu Glu Gly Arg Leu Ser Gln Leu Glu Glu Glu Leu 1745 1750 1755 Glu Glu Glu Gln Asn Asn Ser Glu Leu Leu Lys Asp His Tyr Arg 1760 1765 1770 Lys Leu Val Leu Gln Val Glu Ser Leu Thr Thr Glu Leu Ser Ala 1775 1780 1785 Glu Arg Ser Phe Ser Ala Lys Ala Glu Ser Gly Arg Gln Gln Leu 1790 1795 1800 Glu Arg Gln Ile Gln Glu Leu Arg Ala Arg Leu Gly Glu Glu Asp 1805 1810 1815 Ala Gly Ala Arg Ala Arg Gln Lys Met Leu Ile Ala Ala Leu Glu 1820 1825 1830 Ser Lys Leu Ala Gln Ala Glu Glu Gln Leu Glu Gln Glu Ser Arg 1835 1840 1845 Glu Arg Ile Leu Ser Gly Lys Leu Val Arg Arg Ala Glu Lys Arg 1850 1855 1860 Leu Lys Glu Val Val Leu Gln Val Asp Glu Glu Arg Arg Val Ala 1865 1870 1875 Asp Gln Val Arg Asp Gln Leu Glu Lys Ser Asn Leu Arg Leu Lys 1880 1885 1890 Gln Leu Lys Arg Gln Leu Glu Glu Ala Glu Glu Glu Ala Ser Arg 1895 1900 1905 Ala Gln Ala Gly Arg Arg Arg Leu Gln Arg Glu Leu Glu Asp Val 1910 1915 1920 Thr Glu Ser Ala Glu Ser Met Asn Arg Glu Val Thr Thr Leu Arg 1925 1930 1935 Asn Arg Leu Arg Arg Gly Pro Leu Thr Phe Thr Thr Arg Thr Val 1940 1945 1950 Arg Gln Val Phe Arg Leu Glu Glu Gly Val Ala Ser Asp Glu Glu 1955 1960 1965 Glu Ala Glu Gly Ala Glu Pro Gly Ser Ala Pro Gly Gln Glu Pro 1970 1975 1980 Glu Ala Pro Pro Pro Ala Thr Pro Gln 1985 1990 596786DNAHomo sapiens 59ctctttctcc ccaggccgaa gcctcgggac ggccctggaa gccgaccatg gcagccgtga 60ccatgtcggt gcccgggcgg aaggcgcccc ccaggccggg cccagtgccc gaggcggccc 120agccgttcct gttcacgccc cgcgggccca gcgcgggtgg cgggcctggc tcgggcacct 180ccccgcaggt ggagtggacg gcccggcgtc tcgtgtgggt gccttcggag cttcacgggt 240tcgaggcggc ggcgctgcgg gacgaaggcg aggaggaggc ggaggtggag ctggcggaga 300gcgggaggcg gctgcgactg ccgcgggacc agatccagcg catgaacccg cccaagttca 360gcaaggccga ggacatggcc gagctgacct gcctcaacga ggcctcggtc ctgcacaacc 420tccgggagcg gtactactcc ggcctcatct acacgtactc cggccttttc tgtgtggtca 480tcaacccgta caagcagctt cccatctaca cagaagccat tgtggagatg taccggggca 540agaagcgcca cgaggtgcca ccccacgtgt acgcagtgac cgagggggcc tatcggagca 600tgctgcagga tcgtgaggac cagtccattc tctgcactgg agagtctgga gctgggaaga 660cggaaaacac caagaaggtc atccagtacc tcgcccacgt ggcatcgtct ccaaagggca 720ggaaggagcc gggtgtcccc ggtgagctgg agcggcagct gcttcaggcc aaccccatcc 780tagaggcctt tggcaatgcc aagacagtga agaatgacaa ctcctcccga ttcggcaaat 840tcatccgcat caactttgat gttgccgggt acatcgtggg cgccaacatt gagacctacc 900tgctggagaa gtcgcgggcc atccgccagg ccaaggacga gtgcagcttc cacatcttct 960accagctgct ggggggcgct ggagagcagc tcaaagccga cctcctcctc gagccctgct 1020cccactaccg gttcctgacc aacgggccgt catcctctcc cggccaggag cgggaactct 1080tccaggagac gctggagtcg ctgcgggtcc tgggattcag ccacgaggaa atcatctcca 1140tgctgcggat ggtctcagca gttctccagt ttggcaacat tgccttgaag agagaacgga 1200acaccgatca agccaccatg cctgacaaca cagctgcaca gaagctctgc cgcctcttgg 1260gactgggggt gacggatttc tcccgagcct tgctcacccc tcgcatcaaa gttggccgag 1320actatgtgca gaaagcccag actaaggaac aggctgactt cgcgctggag gccctggcca 1380aggccaccta cgagcgcctc ttccgctggc tggttctgcg cctcaaccgg gccttggacc 1440gcagcccccg ccaaggcgcc tccttcctgg gcatcctgga catcgcgggc tttgagatct 1500tccagctgaa ctccttcgag cagctctgca tcaactacac caacgagaag ctgcagcagc 1560tcttcaacca caccatgttc gtgctggagc aggaggagta ccagcgtgag ggcatcccct 1620ggaccttcct cgactttggc ctcgacctgc agccctgcat cgacctcatc gagcggccgg 1680ccaacccccc tggactcctg gccctgctgg atgaggagtg ctggttcccg aaggccacag 1740acaagtcgtt tgtggagaag gtagcccagg agcagggcgg ccaccccaag ttccagcggc 1800cgaggcacct gcgggatcag gccgacttca gtgttctcca ctacgcgggc aaggtcgact 1860acaaggccaa cgagtggctg atgaaaaaca tggaccctct gaatgacaac gtcgcagcct 1920tgctccacca gagcacagac cggctgacgg cagagatctg gaaagacgtg gagggcatcg 1980tggggctgga acaggtgagc agcctgggcg acggcccacc aggtggccgc ccccgtcggg 2040gtatgttccg gacagtggga cagctctaca aggagtccct gagccgcctc atggccacac 2100tcagcaacac caaccccagt tttgtccggt gcattgtccc caaccacgag aagagggccg 2160ggaagctgga gccacggctg gtgctggacc agcttcgctg caacggggtc ctggagggca 2220tccgcatctg tcgccagggc ttccccaacc gcatcctctt ccaggagttc cggcagcgat 2280acgagatcct gacacccaat gccatcccca agggcttcat ggatgggaag caggcctgtg 2340aaaagatgat ccaggcgctg gaactggacc ccaacctcta

ccgcgtggga cagagcaaga 2400tcttcttccg ggctggggtc ctggcccagc tggaagagga gcgagacctg aaggtcaccg 2460acatcatcgt ctccttccag gcagctgccc ggggatacct ggctcgcagg gccttccaga 2520agcgccagca gcagcagagc gccctgaggg tgatgcagcg gaactgcgcg gcctacctca 2580agctgagaca ctggcagtgg tggcggctgt ttaccaaggt gaagccactg ctgcaggtga 2640cgcggcagga tgaggtgctg caggcacggg cccaggagct gcagaaagtg caggagctac 2700agcagcagag cgcccgcgaa gttggggagc tccagggccg agtggcacag ctggaagagg 2760agcgcgcccg cctggcagag caattgcgag cagaggcaga actgtgtgca gaggccgagg 2820agacgcgggg gaggctggca gcccgcaagc aggagctgga gctggtggtg tcagagctgg 2880aggctcgcgt gggcgaggag gaggagtgca gccgtcaaat gcaaaccgag aagaagaggc 2940tacagcagca catacaggag ctagaggccc accttgaggc tgaggagggt gcgcggcaga 3000agctgcagct ggagaaggtg acgacagagg caaaaatgaa gaaatttgaa gaggacctgc 3060tgctcctgga agaccagaat tccaagctga gcaagagcgg aagctgctgg aagatcgtct 3120ggccgagttc tcatcccagg cagctgagga ggaggagaag gtcaagagcc tcaataagct 3180acggctcaaa tatgaggcca caatcgcaga catggaggga ccgcctacgg aaggaggaga 3240agggtcgcca ggagctggag aagctgaagc ggaggctgga tggggagagc tcagagctgc 3300aggagcagat ggtggagcag caacagcggg cagaggagct gcgggcccag ctgggccgga 3360aggaggagga gctgcaggct gccctggcca gggcagaaga cgagggtggg gcccgggccc 3420agctgctgaa atccctgcgg gaggctcaag cagccctggc cgaggcccag gaggacctgg 3480agtctgagcg tgtggccagg accaaggcgg agaagcagcg ccgggacctg ggcgaggagc 3540tggaggcgct gcggggcgag ctggaggaca cgctggactc caccaacgca cagcaggagc 3600tccggtccaa gagggaacag gaggtgacgg agctgaagaa gactctggag gaggagactc 3660gcatccacga ggcggcagtg caggagctga ggcagcgcca cggccaggcc ctgggggagc 3720tggcggagca gctggagcag gcccggaggg gcaaaggtgc atgggagaag acccggctgg 3780ccctggaggc cgaggtgtcc gagctgcggg cagaactgag cagcctgcag actgcacgtc 3840aggagggtga gcagcggagg cgccgcctgg agttacagct gcaggaggtg cagggccggg 3900ctggtgatgg ggagagggca cgagcggagg ctgctgagaa gctgcagcga gcccaggctg 3960aactggagaa tgtgtctggg gcgctgaacg aggctgagtc caaaaccatc cgtcttagca 4020aggagctgag cagcacagaa gcccagctgc acgatgccca ggagctgctg caggaggaga 4080ccagggcgaa attggccttg gggtcccggg tgcgagccat ggaggctgag gcagccgggc 4140tgcgtgagca gctggaggag gaggcagctg ccagggaacg ggcgggccgt gaactgcaga 4200ctgcccaggc ccagctttcc gagtggcggc ggcgccagga ggaggaggca ggggcactgg 4260aggcagggga ggaggcacgg cgccgggcag cccgggaggc cgaggccctg acccagcgcc 4320tggcagaaaa gacagagacc gtggatcggc tggagcgggg ccgccgccgg ctgcagcagg 4380agctggacga cgccaccatg gacctggagc agcagcggca gcttgtgagc accctggaga 4440agaagcagcg caagtttgac cagcttctgg cagaggagaa ggcagctgta cttcgggcag 4500tggaggaacg tgagcgggcc gaggcagagg gccgggagcg tgaggctcgg gccctgtcac 4560tgacacgggc actggaggag gagcaggagg cacgtgagga gctggagcgg cagaaccggg 4620ccctgcgggc tgagctggag gcactgctga gcagcaagga tgacgtcggc aagagcgtgc 4680atgagctgga acgagcctgc cgggtagcag aacaggcagc caatgatctg cgagcacagg 4740tgacagaact ggaggatgag ctgacagcgg ccgaggatgc caagctgcgt ctggaggtga 4800ctgtgcaggc tctcaagact cagcatgagc gtgacctgca gggccgtgat gaggctggtg 4860aagagaggcg gaggcagctg gccaagcagc tgagagatgc agaggtggag cgggatgagg 4920agcggaagca gcgcactctg gccgtggctg cccgcaagaa gctggaggga gagctggagg 4980agctgaaggc tcagatggcc tctgccggcc agggcaagga ggaggcggtg aagcagcttc 5040gcaagatgca ggcccagatg aaggagctat ggcgggaggt ggaggagaca cgcacctccc 5100gggaggagat cttctcccag aatcgggaaa gtgaaaagcg cctcaagggc ctggaggctg 5160aggtgctgcg gctgcaggag gaactggccg cctcggaccg tgctcggcgg caggcccagc 5220aggaccggga tgagatggca gatgaggtgg ccaatggtaa ccttagcaag gcagccattc 5280tggaggagaa gcgtcagctg gaggggcgcc tggggcagtt ggaggaagag ctggaggagg 5340agcagagcaa ctcagagctg ctcaatgacc gctaccgcaa gctgctcctg caggtagagt 5400cactgaccac agagctgtca gctgagcgca gtttctcagc caaggcagag agcgggcggc 5460agcagctgga acggcagatc caggagctac ggggacgcct gggtgaggag gatgctgggg 5520cccgtgcccg ccacaagatg accattgctg cccttgagtc taagttggcc caggctgagg 5580agcagctaga gcaagagacc agagagcgca tcctctctgg aaagctggtg cgcagagctg 5640agaagcggct taaagaggtg gtgctccagg tggaggagga gcggagggtg gctgaccagc 5700tccgggacca gctggagaag ggaaaccttc gagtcaagca gctgaagcgg cagctggagg 5760aggccgagga ggaggcatcc cgggctcagg ctggccgccg gaggctgcag cgtgagctgg 5820aagatgtcac agagtcggcc gagtccatga accgtgaagt gaccacactg aggaaccggc 5880ttcgacgcgg ccccctcacc ttcaccaccc gcacggtgcg ccaggtcttc cgactagagg 5940agggcgtggc atccgacgag gaggcagagg aagcacagcc tgggtctggg ccatccccgg 6000agcctgaggg gtccccacca gcccaccccc agtgacccta ccctgtcccc agatgcacta 6060acagatgggg cccagccccc ttcctccctg gaccccacgg gcccctgtcc caggaacccc 6120gccctctgac ttcttgccct ttggaaatgg tgcagcactc tggcatttat cacccccacc 6180tgggtcccct gcaacctccc atcaaaggat gacccctaaa cacagaggag cggggcaggc 6240agggaggcaa ggactggagc taccttgctt gttgggggac tgggtacagt tggcaagctg 6300tgtttccatc agctccctgt cctcctttct tccctcgtta ttgatctata gacattagga 6360agggagtgag acggctcctc caccatcctc agccagtgca acccattccc tctgcttctc 6420tctctctctc tctctctccc tccctctcct tccctaccct ctcaccatct ttcttggcct 6480ctctgagggt ctctctgtgc atctttttag gaatctcgct ctcactctct acgtagccac 6540tctccttccc ccatttctgc gtccacccct gaactcctga gcgacagaag ccccaggcct 6600ccaccagcct tgaacccttg caaaggggca ggacaagggg acccctctca ctcctgctgc 6660tgcccatgct ctgccctccc ttctggttgc tctgagggtt cggagcttcc ctctgggact 6720aaaggagtgt cctttaccct cccagcctcc aggctctggc agaaataaac tccaacccga 6780ctggac 6786601995PRTHomo sapiens 60Met Ala Ala Val Thr Met Ser Val Pro Gly Arg Lys Ala Pro Pro Arg 1 5 10 15 Pro Gly Pro Val Pro Glu Ala Ala Gln Pro Phe Leu Phe Thr Pro Arg 20 25 30 Gly Pro Ser Ala Gly Gly Gly Pro Gly Ser Gly Thr Ser Pro Gln Val 35 40 45 Glu Trp Thr Ala Arg Arg Leu Val Trp Val Pro Ser Glu Leu His Gly 50 55 60 Phe Glu Ala Ala Ala Leu Arg Asp Glu Gly Glu Glu Glu Ala Glu Val 65 70 75 80 Glu Leu Ala Glu Ser Gly Arg Arg Leu Arg Leu Pro Arg Asp Gln Ile 85 90 95 Gln Arg Met Asn Pro Pro Lys Phe Ser Lys Ala Glu Asp Met Ala Glu 100 105 110 Leu Thr Cys Leu Asn Glu Ala Ser Val Leu His Asn Leu Arg Glu Arg 115 120 125 Tyr Tyr Ser Gly Leu Ile Tyr Thr Tyr Ser Gly Leu Phe Cys Val Val 130 135 140 Ile Asn Pro Tyr Lys Gln Leu Pro Ile Tyr Thr Glu Ala Ile Val Glu 145 150 155 160 Met Tyr Arg Gly Lys Lys Arg His Glu Val Pro Pro His Val Tyr Ala 165 170 175 Val Thr Glu Gly Ala Tyr Arg Ser Met Leu Gln Asp Arg Glu Asp Gln 180 185 190 Ser Ile Leu Cys Thr Gly Glu Ser Gly Ala Gly Lys Thr Glu Asn Thr 195 200 205 Lys Lys Val Ile Gln Tyr Leu Ala His Val Ala Ser Ser Pro Lys Gly 210 215 220 Arg Lys Glu Pro Gly Val Pro Gly Glu Leu Glu Arg Gln Leu Leu Gln 225 230 235 240 Ala Asn Pro Ile Leu Glu Ala Phe Gly Asn Ala Lys Thr Val Lys Asn 245 250 255 Asp Asn Ser Ser Arg Phe Gly Lys Phe Ile Arg Ile Asn Phe Asp Val 260 265 270 Ala Gly Tyr Ile Val Gly Ala Asn Ile Glu Thr Tyr Leu Leu Glu Lys 275 280 285 Ser Arg Ala Ile Arg Gln Ala Lys Asp Glu Cys Ser Phe His Ile Phe 290 295 300 Tyr Gln Leu Leu Gly Gly Ala Gly Glu Gln Leu Lys Ala Asp Leu Leu 305 310 315 320 Leu Glu Pro Cys Ser His Tyr Arg Phe Leu Thr Asn Gly Pro Ser Ser 325 330 335 Ser Pro Gly Gln Glu Arg Glu Leu Phe Gln Glu Thr Leu Glu Ser Leu 340 345 350 Arg Val Leu Gly Phe Ser His Glu Glu Ile Ile Ser Met Leu Arg Met 355 360 365 Val Ser Ala Val Leu Gln Phe Gly Asn Ile Ala Leu Lys Arg Glu Arg 370 375 380 Asn Thr Asp Gln Ala Thr Met Pro Asp Asn Thr Ala Ala Gln Lys Leu 385 390 395 400 Cys Arg Leu Leu Gly Leu Gly Val Thr Asp Phe Ser Arg Ala Leu Leu 405 410 415 Thr Pro Arg Ile Lys Val Gly Arg Asp Tyr Val Gln Lys Ala Gln Thr 420 425 430 Lys Glu Gln Ala Asp Phe Ala Leu Glu Ala Leu Ala Lys Ala Thr Tyr 435 440 445 Glu Arg Leu Phe Arg Trp Leu Val Leu Arg Leu Asn Arg Ala Leu Asp 450 455 460 Arg Ser Pro Arg Gln Gly Ala Ser Phe Leu Gly Ile Leu Asp Ile Ala 465 470 475 480 Gly Phe Glu Ile Phe Gln Leu Asn Ser Phe Glu Gln Leu Cys Ile Asn 485 490 495 Tyr Thr Asn Glu Lys Leu Gln Gln Leu Phe Asn His Thr Met Phe Val 500 505 510 Leu Glu Gln Glu Glu Tyr Gln Arg Glu Gly Ile Pro Trp Thr Phe Leu 515 520 525 Asp Phe Gly Leu Asp Leu Gln Pro Cys Ile Asp Leu Ile Glu Arg Pro 530 535 540 Ala Asn Pro Pro Gly Leu Leu Ala Leu Leu Asp Glu Glu Cys Trp Phe 545 550 555 560 Pro Lys Ala Thr Asp Lys Ser Phe Val Glu Lys Val Ala Gln Glu Gln 565 570 575 Gly Gly His Pro Lys Phe Gln Arg Pro Arg His Leu Arg Asp Gln Ala 580 585 590 Asp Phe Ser Val Leu His Tyr Ala Gly Lys Val Asp Tyr Lys Ala Asn 595 600 605 Glu Trp Leu Met Lys Asn Met Asp Pro Leu Asn Asp Asn Val Ala Ala 610 615 620 Leu Leu His Gln Ser Thr Asp Arg Leu Thr Ala Glu Ile Trp Lys Asp 625 630 635 640 Val Glu Gly Ile Val Gly Leu Glu Gln Val Ser Ser Leu Gly Asp Gly 645 650 655 Pro Pro Gly Gly Arg Pro Arg Arg Gly Met Phe Arg Thr Val Gly Gln 660 665 670 Leu Tyr Lys Glu Ser Leu Ser Arg Leu Met Ala Thr Leu Ser Asn Thr 675 680 685 Asn Pro Ser Phe Val Arg Cys Ile Val Pro Asn His Glu Lys Arg Ala 690 695 700 Gly Lys Leu Glu Pro Arg Leu Val Leu Asp Gln Leu Arg Cys Asn Gly 705 710 715 720 Val Leu Glu Gly Ile Arg Ile Cys Arg Gln Gly Phe Pro Asn Arg Ile 725 730 735 Leu Phe Gln Glu Phe Arg Gln Arg Tyr Glu Ile Leu Thr Pro Asn Ala 740 745 750 Ile Pro Lys Gly Phe Met Asp Gly Lys Gln Ala Cys Glu Lys Met Ile 755 760 765 Gln Ala Leu Glu Leu Asp Pro Asn Leu Tyr Arg Val Gly Gln Ser Lys 770 775 780 Ile Phe Phe Arg Ala Gly Val Leu Ala Gln Leu Glu Glu Glu Arg Asp 785 790 795 800 Leu Lys Val Thr Asp Ile Ile Val Ser Phe Gln Ala Ala Ala Arg Gly 805 810 815 Tyr Leu Ala Arg Arg Ala Phe Gln Lys Arg Gln Gln Gln Gln Ser Ala 820 825 830 Leu Arg Val Met Gln Arg Asn Cys Ala Ala Tyr Leu Lys Leu Arg His 835 840 845 Trp Gln Trp Trp Arg Leu Phe Thr Lys Val Lys Pro Leu Leu Gln Val 850 855 860 Thr Arg Gln Asp Glu Val Leu Gln Ala Arg Ala Gln Glu Leu Gln Lys 865 870 875 880 Val Gln Glu Leu Gln Gln Gln Ser Ala Arg Glu Val Gly Glu Leu Gln 885 890 895 Gly Arg Val Ala Gln Leu Glu Glu Glu Arg Ala Arg Leu Ala Glu Gln 900 905 910 Leu Arg Ala Glu Ala Glu Leu Cys Ala Glu Ala Glu Glu Thr Arg Gly 915 920 925 Arg Leu Ala Ala Arg Lys Gln Glu Leu Glu Leu Val Val Ser Glu Leu 930 935 940 Glu Ala Arg Val Gly Glu Glu Glu Glu Cys Ser Arg Gln Met Gln Thr 945 950 955 960 Glu Lys Lys Arg Leu Gln Gln His Ile Gln Glu Leu Glu Ala His Leu 965 970 975 Glu Ala Glu Glu Gly Ala Arg Gln Lys Leu Gln Leu Glu Lys Val Thr 980 985 990 Thr Glu Ala Lys Met Lys Lys Phe Glu Glu Asp Leu Leu Leu Leu Glu 995 1000 1005 Asp Gln Asn Ser Lys Leu Ser Lys Ser Gly Ser Cys Trp Lys Ile 1010 1015 1020 Val Trp Pro Ser Ser His Pro Arg Gln Leu Arg Arg Arg Arg Arg 1025 1030 1035 Ser Arg Ala Ser Ile Ser Tyr Gly Ser Asn Met Arg Pro Gln Ser 1040 1045 1050 Gln Thr Trp Arg Asp Arg Leu Arg Lys Glu Glu Lys Gly Arg Gln 1055 1060 1065 Glu Leu Glu Lys Leu Lys Arg Arg Leu Asp Gly Glu Ser Ser Glu 1070 1075 1080 Leu Gln Glu Gln Met Val Glu Gln Gln Gln Arg Ala Glu Glu Leu 1085 1090 1095 Arg Ala Gln Leu Gly Arg Lys Glu Glu Glu Leu Gln Ala Ala Leu 1100 1105 1110 Ala Arg Ala Glu Asp Glu Gly Gly Ala Arg Ala Gln Leu Leu Lys 1115 1120 1125 Ser Leu Arg Glu Ala Gln Ala Ala Leu Ala Glu Ala Gln Glu Asp 1130 1135 1140 Leu Glu Ser Glu Arg Val Ala Arg Thr Lys Ala Glu Lys Gln Arg 1145 1150 1155 Arg Asp Leu Gly Glu Glu Leu Glu Ala Leu Arg Gly Glu Leu Glu 1160 1165 1170 Asp Thr Leu Asp Ser Thr Asn Ala Gln Gln Glu Leu Arg Ser Lys 1175 1180 1185 Arg Glu Gln Glu Val Thr Glu Leu Lys Lys Thr Leu Glu Glu Glu 1190 1195 1200 Thr Arg Ile His Glu Ala Ala Val Gln Glu Leu Arg Gln Arg His 1205 1210 1215 Gly Gln Ala Leu Gly Glu Leu Ala Glu Gln Leu Glu Gln Ala Arg 1220 1225 1230 Arg Gly Lys Gly Ala Trp Glu Lys Thr Arg Leu Ala Leu Glu Ala 1235 1240 1245 Glu Val Ser Glu Leu Arg Ala Glu Leu Ser Ser Leu Gln Thr Ala 1250 1255 1260 Arg Gln Glu Gly Glu Gln Arg Arg Arg Arg Leu Glu Leu Gln Leu 1265 1270 1275 Gln Glu Val Gln Gly Arg Ala Gly Asp Gly Glu Arg Ala Arg Ala 1280 1285 1290 Glu Ala Ala Glu Lys Leu Gln Arg Ala Gln Ala Glu Leu Glu Asn 1295 1300 1305 Val Ser Gly Ala Leu Asn Glu Ala Glu Ser Lys Thr Ile Arg Leu 1310 1315 1320 Ser Lys Glu Leu Ser Ser Thr Glu Ala Gln Leu His Asp Ala Gln 1325 1330 1335 Glu Leu Leu Gln Glu Glu Thr Arg Ala Lys Leu Ala Leu Gly Ser 1340 1345 1350 Arg Val Arg Ala Met Glu Ala Glu Ala Ala Gly Leu Arg Glu Gln 1355 1360 1365 Leu Glu Glu Glu Ala Ala Ala Arg Glu Arg Ala Gly Arg Glu Leu 1370 1375 1380 Gln Thr Ala Gln Ala Gln Leu Ser Glu Trp Arg Arg Arg Gln Glu 1385 1390 1395 Glu Glu Ala Gly Ala Leu Glu Ala Gly Glu Glu Ala Arg Arg Arg 1400 1405 1410 Ala Ala Arg Glu Ala Glu Ala Leu Thr Gln Arg Leu Ala Glu Lys 1415 1420 1425 Thr Glu Thr Val Asp Arg Leu Glu Arg Gly Arg Arg Arg Leu Gln 1430 1435 1440 Gln Glu Leu Asp Asp Ala Thr Met Asp Leu Glu Gln Gln Arg Gln 1445 1450 1455 Leu Val Ser Thr Leu Glu Lys Lys Gln Arg Lys Phe Asp Gln Leu 1460 1465 1470 Leu Ala Glu Glu Lys Ala Ala Val Leu Arg Ala Val Glu Glu Arg 1475 1480 1485 Glu Arg Ala Glu Ala Glu Gly Arg Glu Arg Glu Ala Arg Ala Leu 1490 1495 1500 Ser Leu Thr Arg Ala Leu Glu Glu Glu Gln Glu Ala Arg Glu Glu 1505 1510 1515 Leu Glu Arg Gln Asn Arg Ala Leu Arg Ala Glu Leu Glu Ala Leu 1520 1525 1530 Leu Ser Ser Lys Asp Asp Val Gly Lys Ser Val His Glu Leu Glu 1535 1540 1545 Arg Ala Cys Arg Val Ala Glu Gln Ala Ala Asn Asp Leu Arg Ala 1550 1555 1560 Gln Val Thr Glu Leu Glu Asp Glu Leu Thr Ala Ala Glu Asp Ala 1565 1570 1575 Lys Leu Arg Leu Glu Val Thr Val Gln Ala Leu Lys Thr Gln His 1580 1585

1590 Glu Arg Asp Leu Gln Gly Arg Asp Glu Ala Gly Glu Glu Arg Arg 1595 1600 1605 Arg Gln Leu Ala Lys Gln Leu Arg Asp Ala Glu Val Glu Arg Asp 1610 1615 1620 Glu Glu Arg Lys Gln Arg Thr Leu Ala Val Ala Ala Arg Lys Lys 1625 1630 1635 Leu Glu Gly Glu Leu Glu Glu Leu Lys Ala Gln Met Ala Ser Ala 1640 1645 1650 Gly Gln Gly Lys Glu Glu Ala Val Lys Gln Leu Arg Lys Met Gln 1655 1660 1665 Ala Gln Met Lys Glu Leu Trp Arg Glu Val Glu Glu Thr Arg Thr 1670 1675 1680 Ser Arg Glu Glu Ile Phe Ser Gln Asn Arg Glu Ser Glu Lys Arg 1685 1690 1695 Leu Lys Gly Leu Glu Ala Glu Val Leu Arg Leu Gln Glu Glu Leu 1700 1705 1710 Ala Ala Ser Asp Arg Ala Arg Arg Gln Ala Gln Gln Asp Arg Asp 1715 1720 1725 Glu Met Ala Asp Glu Val Ala Asn Gly Asn Leu Ser Lys Ala Ala 1730 1735 1740 Ile Leu Glu Glu Lys Arg Gln Leu Glu Gly Arg Leu Gly Gln Leu 1745 1750 1755 Glu Glu Glu Leu Glu Glu Glu Gln Ser Asn Ser Glu Leu Leu Asn 1760 1765 1770 Asp Arg Tyr Arg Lys Leu Leu Leu Gln Val Glu Ser Leu Thr Thr 1775 1780 1785 Glu Leu Ser Ala Glu Arg Ser Phe Ser Ala Lys Ala Glu Ser Gly 1790 1795 1800 Arg Gln Gln Leu Glu Arg Gln Ile Gln Glu Leu Arg Gly Arg Leu 1805 1810 1815 Gly Glu Glu Asp Ala Gly Ala Arg Ala Arg His Lys Met Thr Ile 1820 1825 1830 Ala Ala Leu Glu Ser Lys Leu Ala Gln Ala Glu Glu Gln Leu Glu 1835 1840 1845 Gln Glu Thr Arg Glu Arg Ile Leu Ser Gly Lys Leu Val Arg Arg 1850 1855 1860 Ala Glu Lys Arg Leu Lys Glu Val Val Leu Gln Val Glu Glu Glu 1865 1870 1875 Arg Arg Val Ala Asp Gln Leu Arg Asp Gln Leu Glu Lys Gly Asn 1880 1885 1890 Leu Arg Val Lys Gln Leu Lys Arg Gln Leu Glu Glu Ala Glu Glu 1895 1900 1905 Glu Ala Ser Arg Ala Gln Ala Gly Arg Arg Arg Leu Gln Arg Glu 1910 1915 1920 Leu Glu Asp Val Thr Glu Ser Ala Glu Ser Met Asn Arg Glu Val 1925 1930 1935 Thr Thr Leu Arg Asn Arg Leu Arg Arg Gly Pro Leu Thr Phe Thr 1940 1945 1950 Thr Arg Thr Val Arg Gln Val Phe Arg Leu Glu Glu Gly Val Ala 1955 1960 1965 Ser Asp Glu Glu Ala Glu Glu Ala Gln Pro Gly Ser Gly Pro Ser 1970 1975 1980 Pro Glu Pro Glu Gly Ser Pro Pro Ala His Pro Gln 1985 1990 1995 6112PRTArtificial SequenceSynthetic peptide 61Ala Cys Gly Met Pro Tyr Val Arg Ile Pro Thr Ala 1 5 10 6212PRTArtificial SequenceSynthetic peptide 62Ala Gly Cys Met Pro Tyr Val Arg Ile Pro Thr Ala 1 5 10 6311PRTHomo sapiens 63Leu Met Lys Asn Met Asp Pro Leu Asn Asp Ile 1 5 10 6412PRTHomo sapiens 64Leu Met Lys Asn Met Asp Pro Leu Asn Asp Asn Val 1 5 10 6515PRTArtificial SequenceSynthetic linker peptide 65Gly Gly Gly Gly Ser Gly Gly Gly Gly Ser Gly Gly Gly Gly Ser 1 5 10 15

* * * * *

File A Patent Application

  • Protect your idea -- Don't let someone else file first. Learn more.

  • 3 Easy Steps -- Complete Form, application Review, and File. See our process.

  • Attorney Review -- Have your application reviewed by a Patent Attorney. See what's included.