Easy To Use Patents Search & Patent Lawyer Directory

At Patents you can conduct a Patent Search, File a Patent Application, find a Patent Attorney, or search available technology through our Patent Exchange. Patents are available using simple keyword or date criteria. If you are looking to hire a patent attorney, you've come to the right place. Protect your idea and hire a patent lawyer.


Search All Patents:



  This Patent May Be For Sale or Lease. Contact Us

  Is This Your Patent? Claim This Patent Now.



Register or Login To Download This Patent As A PDF




United States Patent Application 20170374081
Kind Code A9
Deasy; Stephen ;   et al. December 28, 2017

Provisioning Work Environments on Personal Mobile Devices

Abstract

A virtual business mobile device can be provisioned on a personal mobile device, by binding a mobile application for provisioning the business mobile device to a privileged component of a host operating system of the personal mobile device, wherein the binding enables a software virtualization layer and a management service component of the mobile application to execute in a privileged mode. The mobile application is then able to download a virtual phone image for the business mobile device and security-related policy settings relating to use of the business mobile device from a mobile management server, wherein the software virtualization layer is able to launch a virtual machine for the business mobile device based on the virtual phone image. Once the virtual phone image has been downloaded, the management service component initiates a periodic attempt to establish a connection with the mobile management server to comply with the downloaded security-related policy settings.


Inventors: Deasy; Stephen; (Brighton, MA) ; Newell; Craig; (Cambridge, MA) ; Sit; Emil; (Cambridge, MA) ; Wisner; Paul; (Arlington, MA) ; Furodet; David; (Pontcharra, FR) ; Gyuris; Viktor; (Newton, MA) ; Meyer; Robert; (Harvard, MA) ; Strudel; Fanny; (Brignoud, FR)
Applicant:
Name City State Country Type

VMware, Inc.

Palo Alto

CA

US
Prior Publication:
  Document IdentifierPublication Date
US 20170244724 A1August 24, 2017
Family ID: 1000003033570
Appl. No.: 15/401225
Filed: January 9, 2017


Related U.S. Patent Documents

Application NumberFiling DatePatent Number
14929027Oct 30, 20159577985
15401225
13678964Nov 16, 20129219813
14929027
61562979Nov 22, 2011

Current U.S. Class: 1/1
Current CPC Class: H04L 63/108 20130101; H04W 8/22 20130101; H04L 67/34 20130101; G06F 9/45529 20130101; G06F 21/629 20130101; G06F 21/6245 20130101; H04L 63/20 20130101
International Class: H04L 29/06 20060101 H04L029/06; G06F 21/62 20130101 G06F021/62; G06F 9/455 20060101 G06F009/455; H04W 8/22 20090101 H04W008/22; H04L 29/08 20060101 H04L029/08

Claims



1-36. (canceled)

37. A method of provisioning mobile device comprising: binding a mobile application for provisioning a business mobile device to a privileged component of a host operating system of the personal mobile device, wherein the business mobile device comprises a virtual machine running on a software virtualization layer and the binding enables the software virtualization layer and a management service component of the mobile application to execute in a privileged mode; downloading, through the mobile application, a virtual phone image for the business mobile device and security-related policy settings relating to use of the business mobile device from a mobile management server, wherein the software virtualization layer is configured to launch the virtual machine for the business mobile device based on the virtual phone image; and removing the virtual phone image of the business mobile device without affecting use of the personal mobile device external to the virtual machine, wherein the management service component is configured to prevent the user of the personal mobile device from terminating the management service component.

38. The method of claim 37, further comprising initiating a periodic attempt to establish a connection between the management service component of the mobile application and the mobile management server to comply with the security-related policy settings.

39. The method of claim 37, wherein the binding comprises an authentication of the mobile application with the privileged component.

40. The method of claim 37, wherein the privileged component facilitates transfer of control between the host operating system of the personal mobile device and the virtual machine of the business mobile device.

41. The method of claim 37, wherein the mobile application is downloaded to the personal mobile device from a mobile application store.

42. The method of claim 41, wherein the mobile application is downloaded by a provisioning component of the mobile application.

43. The method of claim 42, wherein the provisioning component of the mobile application is configured with a network address of the mobile management server.

44. The method of claim 37, wherein the security-related policy settings comprise at least one of an interval time period to establish communications between the management service component and the mobile management server, an auto-disable time period to temporarily disable the business mobile device and an auto-wipe time period to permanently remove the business mobile device from the personal mobile device.

45. The method of claim 37, further comprising downloading any updates to the business mobile device from the mobile management service upon successfully establishing a connection between the management service and the mobile management servicer during a periodic attempt.

46. The method of claim 37, further comprising temporarily disabling access to the business mobile device upon expiration of an auto-disable time period specified in the security-related profile settings.

47. A mobile device configured to support a virtual business mobile device, the mobile device configured to at least: bind a mobile application for provisioning a business mobile device to a privileged component of a host operating system of the personal mobile device, wherein the business mobile device comprises a virtual machine running on a software virtualization layer and the binding enables the software virtualization layer and a management service component of the mobile application to execute in a privileged mode; download, through the mobile application, a virtual phone image for the business mobile device and security-related policy settings relating to use of the business mobile device from a mobile management server, wherein the software virtualization layer is configured to launch the virtual machine for the business mobile device based on the virtual phone image; and remove the virtual phone image of the business mobile device without affecting use of the personal mobile device external to the virtual machine, wherein the management service component is configured to prevent the user of the personal mobile device from terminating the management service component.

48. The mobile device of claim 47, wherein the mobile device is further configured to initiate a periodic attempt to establish a connection between the management service component of the mobile application and the mobile management server to comply with the security-related policy settings.

49. The mobile device of claim 47, wherein the mobile device binds by authenticating of the mobile application with the privileged component.

50. The mobile device of claim 47, wherein the privileged component facilitates transfer of control between the host operating system of the personal mobile device and the virtual machine of the business mobile device.

51. The mobile device of claim 47, wherein the mobile application is downloaded to the mobile device from a mobile application store.

52. The mobile device of claim 47, wherein the mobile application is downloaded by a provisioning component of the mobile application.

53. The mobile device of claim 47, wherein the provisioning component is configured with a network address of the mobile management server.

54. The mobile device of claim 47, wherein the security-related policy settings comprise at least one of an interval time period to establish communications between the management service component and the mobile management server, an auto-disable time period to temporarily disable the virtual business mobile device and an auto-wipe time period to permanently remove the virtual business mobile device from the mobile device.

55. The mobile device of claim 47, wherein the mobile device is further configured to download any updates to the virtual business mobile device from the mobile management service upon successfully establishing a connection between the management service and the mobile management servicer during a periodic attempt.

56. The mobile device of claim 47, wherein the mobile device is further configured to disable access to the virtual business mobile device upon expiration of an auto-disable time period specified in the security-related profile settings.

57. A non-transitory computer readable storage medium including instructions that cause a processor of a mobile device to at least: bind a mobile application for provisioning a business mobile device to a privileged component of a host operating system of the personal mobile device, wherein the business mobile device comprises a virtual machine running on a software virtualization layer and the binding enables the software virtualization layer and a management service component of the mobile application to execute in a privileged mode; download, through the mobile application, a virtual phone image for the business mobile device and security-related policy settings relating to use of the business mobile device from a mobile management server, wherein the software virtualization layer is configured to launch the virtual machine for the business mobile device based on the virtual phone image; and remove the virtual phone image of the business mobile device without affecting use of the personal mobile device external to the virtual machine, wherein the management service component is configured to prevent the user of the personal mobile device from terminating the management service component.

58. The non-transitory computer readable storage medium of claim 57, wherein the instructions further cause the processor to initiate a periodic attempt to establish a connection between the management service component of the mobile application and the mobile management server to comply with the security-related policy settings.

59. The non-transitory computer readable storage medium of claim 57, wherein the mobile device binds by authenticating the mobile application to the privileged component.

60. The non-transitory computer readable storage medium of claim 57, wherein the privileged component facilitates transfer of control between the host operating system of the mobile device and the virtual machine of the virtual business mobile device.

61. The non-transitory computer readable storage medium of claim 57, wherein the mobile application is downloaded to the mobile device from a mobile application store.

62. The non-transitory computer readable storage medium of claim 57, wherein the mobile application is downloaded by a provisioning component of the mobile application.

63. The non-transitory computer readable storage medium of claim 57, wherein the user provides the provisioning component of the mobile application with a network address of the mobile management server.

64. The non-transitory computer readable storage medium of claim 57, wherein the security-related policy settings comprise at least one of an interval time period to establish communications between the management service component and the mobile management server, an auto-disable time period to temporarily disable the virtual business mobile device and an auto-wipe time period to permanently remove the virtual business mobile device from the mobile device.

65. The non-transitory computer readable storage medium of claim 57, wherein the instructions further cause the processor to perform the step of downloading any updates to the virtual business mobile device from the mobile management service upon successfully establishing a connection between the management service and the mobile management servicer during a periodic attempt.

66. The non-transitory computer readable storage medium of claim 57, wherein the instructions further cause the processor to at least temporarily disable access to the virtual business mobile device upon expiration of an auto-disable time period specified in the security-related profile settings.
Description



CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application is a continuation of application Ser. No. 13/678,964, filed on Nov. 16, 2012, and entitled "Provisioning Work Environments on Personal Mobile Devices" (Attorney Docket No. A838.01), which is hereby incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. application Ser. No. 13/678,964 claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application 61/562,979 filed on Nov. 22, 2011 and entitled "Provisioning Work Environments on Personal Mobile Devices" (Attorney Docket No. A838.PRO), which is hereby incorporated by reference. application Ser. No. 13/678,964 is also related to the patent applications entitled "Controlling Use of a Business Environment on a Mobile Device" (Attorney Docket No. A838.02) and "User Interface for Controlling Use of a Business Environment on a Mobile Device" (Attorney Docket No. A838.03), all of which are assigned to the assignee of this application and have been filed on the same day as this application.

BACKGROUND

[0002] Over the past decade, enterprises have experienced a substantial increase in the productivity of its workforce when providing them with business mobile devices. In the past, given their high cost, business mobile devices were mainly allocated to management and focused on providing employees with email access and cellular phone capabilities. However, recent improvements in the computing power, mobile display technologies and connection speeds of mobile devices, combined with the continued decreases in hardware costs, have made powerful mobile devices available even to the general public for personal use. More and more individuals personally own powerful mobile devices, such as smartphones, that, in addition to serving as a cellular phone, can be used in many of the same ways as a desktop or a laptop, such as accessing emails, browsing documents or the internet, game playing, listening to audio or viewing a video, and personal information management (PIM).

[0003] Due to the above trends in mobile devices, enterprises are currently experiencing an "invasion" of personal devices into the workplace. Given the sophisticated capabilities of their personal mobile devices, employees no longer desire possessing a separate personal and business mobile device and continually pressure information technology (IT) departments to support personal devices brought into the workplace. As such, IT departments struggle to maintain a proper balance between enabling a certain level of access to enterprise data (e.g., such as access to email, contacts, documents, and the like) on personal devices and ensuring adequate security measures to protect corporate intellectual property in such enterprise data. This phenomenon has led enterprises to investigate the viability of a "Bring Your Own Device" (BYOD) strategy to IT, where a personal mobile device is provisioned by IT departments with the capability of operating as a complete business mobile device in a secure fashion.

[0004] Such a BYOD strategy could significantly decrease IT costs (e.g., by eliminating or reducing the need to purchase and provision hardware devices) and provide mobile enterprise access to many more employees than was previously possible (e.g., due to cost concerns), thereby achieving greater increases in productivity than before. However, significant challenges arise in provisioning "work environment" on a personal mobile device that maintains adequate security and data partitioning between the employee's "personal world" and the employer's "business world."

SUMMARY

[0005] One or more embodiments of the invention provide virtualization as the solution for consolidating personal and business uses in a single mobile device. One feature of virtualization is that it preserves isolation of the personal and work environments. As a result, the user need not provide enterprise IT departments any control of the user's personal environment and the enterprise IT departments can retain strict control of the user's work environment. Another feature of virtualization is that the user's work environment will be platform independent. In other words, regardless of the type of personal mobile device the user chooses, the resulting business mobile device through virtualization will be identical. Therefore, enterprise IT departments need to support only one type of business mobile device.

[0006] One method of provisioning a business mobile device on a personal mobile device, according to one or more embodiments of the invention, comprises binding a mobile application for provisioning the business mobile device to a privileged component of a host operating system of the personal mobile device, wherein the binding enables a hypervisor component and a management service component of the mobile application to execute in a privileged mode. The mobile application is then able to download a virtual phone image for the business mobile device and security-related policy settings relating to use of the business mobile device from a mobile management server managed by an employer of a user of the personal mobile device, wherein the hypervisor component is able to launch a virtual machine for the business mobile device based on the virtual phone image. Once the virtual phone image has been downloaded, the method continues by initiating a periodic attempt to establish a connection between the management service component of the mobile application and the mobile management server to comply with the downloaded security-related policy settings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0007] FIG. 1 is an illustration of an example use case in which embodiments may be practiced.

[0008] FIG. 2 depicts an embodiment of a mobile management platform that may be utilized by an IT department to provision a business mobile device on a personal mobile device 100.

[0009] FIGS. 3A-3E depict embodiments of an administrator user interface of a administration service for provisioning a business mobile device on a personal mobile device.

[0010] FIG. 4 depicts an internal system architecture of a personal mobile device that supports a business mobile device according to an embodiment.

[0011] FIG. 5 is a flow that illustrates a process for provisioning a virtual phone image for a business mobile device on a personal mobile device.

[0012] FIG. 6 is a flow that illustrates a process for establishing leasing communications between a mobile management platform server and a personal mobile device.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0013] FIG. 1 is an illustration of an example use case in which embodiments may be practiced. As depicted, an IT department 115 of an enterprise 110 may provide the capability to "provision" a software-based business mobile device 105 that runs on an employee's personal mobile device 100. Such provisioning (e.g., delivery of business mobile device 105 to personal mobile device 100) may be performed "over-the-air" through a wireless network (e.g., WiFi network, etc.), cellular network 120 or combination thereof. In certain embodiments, as described herein, such a software-based business mobile device 105 takes the form of a virtual machine that runs on top of a software virtualization layer (also sometimes referred to herein as a hypervisor) supported by the "host" operating system (e.g., Android.TM., iOS.TM., Symbian.TM., webOS.TM., etc.) of personal mobile device 100 (such virtual machine sometimes also referred to herein as a "virtual phone").

[0014] FIG. 2 depicts an embodiment of a mobile management platform that may be utilized by IT department 115 to provision a business mobile device on personal mobile device 100. As depicted, a mobile management platform server 200 (e.g., software-based) is installed on a computer system of IT department 115 and provides a number of functional components. Through human interface devices (e.g. mouse, keyboard, touchscreen, etc.), an administrator can interact with an admin user interface 205 to access an admin service component 210, which, as further discussed below, offers a variety of services to assist the administrator in provisioning a business mobile device 105 on a personal mobile device 100. As depicted in the embodiment of FIG. 2, admin service component 210 may further include a virtual phone provisioning service component 215 that establishes a connection (e.g., wireless) with personal mobile device 100 in order to deliver a virtual phone image for business mobile device 105 to personal mobile device 100 and a virtual phone leasing service component 220 that periodically communicates (e.g., wirelessly) over time with personal mobile device 100 (e.g., once business mobile device 105 has been installed on personal mobile device 100), for example, in order to ensure compliance with certain security policies regarding the user's ability to access an installed business mobile device 105 or to provide updates to the virtual phone image of business mobile device 105. Admin service component 210 accesses a mobile management database 225 in order to manage and store, for example, user profiles, group profiles (e.g., business groups of an enterprise, such as sales, marketing, legal, finance, engineering, etc.), business mobile device policies (as further described below), virtual phone images for business mobile devices, mobile applications that may be included in virtual phone images, etc. In one embodiment, mobile management database 225 may comprise a relational database to store user profiles, groups profiles and business mobile device policies as well as a file system based repository to store various virtual phone images and mobile applications.

[0015] FIGS. 3A-3E depict embodiments of an admin user interface 205 of an admin service 210. In one embodiment, admin user interface 205 and admin service 210 are implemented as a web application accessible through a web browser although alternative embodiments may be implemented differently, including, for example, as a standalone client-side application. FIG. 3A illustrates an embodiment of an initial "dashboard" view that is displayed, for example, when an administrator initially logs into admin service 210 through admin user interface 205. The left side of FIG. 3A provides a navigation panel enabling an administrator to manage and view various settings relating to users that have been provisioned with business mobile devices, business group configurations for business mobile devices, policy settings for business mobile devices, various virtual phone images for business mobile devices, mobile applications that can be provisioned to business mobile devices and other configuration information. As illustrated, the dashboard's main view provides an overview of recent administration activities (e.g. "activity feed") and other usage statistics. FIG. 3B illustrates a user view displaying information relating to users who have been provisioned a business mobile device by mobile management server 200. As FIG. 3B depicts, users may be organized into a variety of business groups or organizations within enterprise 110, such as sales, marketing, finance, legal, engineering and the like. As further described below, in certain embodiments, such business groups are able to set their own default policies and default virtual phone images for users in their groups. The user view of FIG. 3B also indicates a status of the business mobile device 105 provisioned by admin service 210 to each user. Such status of a user's business mobile device may be, for example, active, inactive, locked, wiped, pending installation, and the like. In certain embodiments of this user view and as further described below, an administrator is able to request that mobile management platform 200 (e.g., via virtual phone leasing component 215, etc.) "wipe" a particular user's business mobile device 105 from the personal mobile device 100 (e.g., delete the virtual phone image or otherwise remove the functionality of business mobile device 105), for example, when such user has left enterprise 110 and is no longer an employee. It should be recognized that such a wiping of business mobile device 105 does not affect the user's ability to use personal mobile device 100. FIG. 3C illustrates a group view displaying information relating to business mobile devices configured for a particular business group within enterprise 110, such as the sales group. As depicted, the group view of FIG. 3C displays a business mobile device policy that has been set for the sales group (i.e., the "default policies set") as well as a virtual phone image that has been set for the sales group (i.e., the "default virtual phone template"). The group view of FIG. 3C further displays users belonging to the sales group who have been provisioned a business mobile device as well as enables the administrator to create, store and modify new and existing groups.

[0016] FIG. 3D illustrates an embodiment of a policy setting view of admin user interface 210. As depicted, the policy setting view of FIG. 3D enables an administrator to view, create, store and modify different policies for managing business mobile devices. Such policies, for example and as illustrated in FIG. 3D, may include "lease" renewal settings including an "interval" setting defining how often virtual phone leasing service 220 and personal mobile device 100 attempt to establish communications, an "auto disable" time period setting, expiration (e.g., time period expires without an intervening interval communication with virtual phone leasing service 220) of which may trigger personal mobile device 100 to temporarily disable business mobile device 105 (e.g., putting business mobile device 105 into a "locked" state that prevents a user from utilizing business mobile device 105 until a successful communication by personal mobile device 110 with virtual phone leasing service 220), an "auto wipe" time period setting, expiration (e.g., time period expires without an intervening interval communication with virtual phone leasing service 220) of which may trigger personal mobile device to permanently "wipe," deactivate or otherwise remove business mobile device 105 from personal mobile device 100, etc. Other security related policy settings may also be configured in the policy setting view of FIG. 3D including, for example, whether a password is required to access business mobile device 105, the type and strength of the password (PIN, etc.), expiration periods for passwords, length of inactivity time before business mobile device 105 presents a lock screen, amount of retries before business mobile device 105 locks, etc. Other policy settings in embodiments may include whether business mobile device 105 may be accessible by VPN, whether a debugging mode can be set on business mobile device 105 to assist an administrator to troubleshoot issues, whether data can be cut and paste and shared between personal mobile device 100 and business mobile device 100, and the like.

[0017] FIG. 3E illustrates an embodiment of a virtual phone image view of administrator user interface 210. Through this view, an administrator is able to view, create, store and modify base virtual phone images for business mobile devices (e.g., according to requirements of different business groups in enterprise 110) that can be delivered to personal mobile device 100. Such a base image or "template" may include a selected mobile "guest" operating system (e.g., Android, iOS, Symbian, webOS, etc.), selected default user settings or customizations for the mobile operations system (e.g., wallpaper, shortcuts, sounds, security settings, network settings, third part service synchronization settings, etc.), selected installed default mobile applications, and the like. FIG. 3A also illustrates additional views accessible from the left side navigation panel that an administrator may desire to select in order to manage business mobile device activity. For example, the "work phone images" button enables the administrator to view current virtual phone images that have been uploaded into mobile management database 225 as well as to upload new virtual phone images. Similarly, the "applications" button enables the administrator to view current mobile applications that have been uploaded into mobile management database 225 and may be added to an existing or new virtual phone template. Such an applications view may further enable the administrator to upload additional mobile applications from third party sources such as various third party application stores (e.g., Android Market, Apple App Store, Amazon Appstore, carrier applications stores, etc.). The "configuration" button may enable the administrator to view currently scheduled jobs that have been scheduled by the administrator (e.g., delivery of virtual phone images to personal mobile devices, updates to existing virtual phone images that have already been installed on personal mobile devices, requests to wipe virtual phone images from personal mobile devices, etc.), a list of administrators in IT department 115 and other configuration information.

[0018] It should be recognized that the views of FIGS. 3A-3E are merely exemplary and that alternative embodiments of admin user interface 205 and admin service 210 may implement different user interfaces with different design decisions that offer different management functions than those depicted in FIGS. 3A-3E. For example, embodiments of administration service 210 may further provide an administrator a capability to maintain a menu of "a la carte" mobile applications that can be separately provisioned to a particular user's business mobile device 105, for example, upon request of such user and separate from any default mobile applications that are included in virtual phone images.

[0019] FIG. 4 depicts an internal system architecture of personal mobile device 100 that supports a business mobile device according to an embodiment. Personal mobile device 100 includes a firmware operation system (OS) 400, such as Android, iOS, Symbian, webOS, etc. In the embodiment of FIG. 4, a virtual phone "enabler" component 405 is embedded into firmware OS 400. Because it is embedded into firmware OS 400, enabler component 405 is able to execute certain of its functions in privileged modes (e.g., superuser, root access, etc.) that are typically reserved for functions of firmware OS 400. For example, in one embodiment, upon a launch of business mobile device 105 by a user (e.g., by selecting a "work phone" icon displayed on personal mobile device 100, etc.), enabler component 405 loads a virtual phone image for business mobile device 105 into the memory of personal mobile device 100 and dedicates a thread for the execution of a virtual machine for business mobile device 105. During execution of the virtual machine for business mobile device 105, other portions of enabler component 405 may then generally support the transfer of control between firmware OS 400 and business mobile device 105 (sometimes referred to as "world switching"). In addition to the foregoing, in certain embodiments, portions of enabler component 405 may further assist with issues such as memory allocation, timers, power management, communications between a hypervisor 415 (as further discussed below) running on top of firmware OS 400 and a virtual hardware platform (sometimes referred to herein as a "virtual machine monitor") of the virtual machine for business mobile device 105, enabling networking capabilities (e.g., TCP/IP, IPv4/IPv6, etc.) for the virtual machine of business mobile device 105 and the like. In one embodiment, enabler component 405 is embedded into firmware OS 400 by a mobile device manufacturer or a carrier 430, such that a personal mobile device 100 purchased by a user (e.g. via generally available methods such as carrier stores, electronics stores, consumer goods stores, ecommerce web sites, etc.) already includes enabler component 405.

[0020] A personal mobile device 100 having firmware OS 400 that includes enabler component 405 is able support a mobile application package 410 that comprises a variety of functional components such as a hypervisor 415, a provisioning tool 420 and a management service 422. In one embodiment, a user may download mobile application package 410 from a mobile application store 435 such as the Android Market, Apple App Store, Amazon Appstore, etc. For example, such a mobile application package 410 may take the form of a .apk file if downloaded from the Android Market. Once downloaded and installed on the host OS of personal mobile device 100, mobile application package 410 authenticates and binds itself to enabler component 405, thereby enabling the various functional components of mobile application package to execute in higher privileged and/or secured modes. Hypervisor 415 is a virtualization layer running on top of firmware OS 400 which provides necessary services to enable execution of a virtual machine for business mobile device 105. In one embodiment, the guest OS included in a virtual phone image 425 for business mobile device 105 includes "paravirtualized" guest drivers for each device of personal mobile device 100 that enables a virtual hardware layer (or virtual machine monitor) of the virtual machine to intercept hypercalls for device specific behavior and forward such hypercall requests as needed to hypervisor 415, which in turn facilitates communication with the actual hardware devices of personal mobile device 10. It should be recognized that alternative embodiments may utilize a non-paravirtualized implementation where guest drivers and the guest OS of virtual phone image 425 may be unaware that they are running on top of a virtualization layer. As further depicted in FIG. 4, mobile application package 410 also includes a provisioning tool 420 that may, for example, provide a user interface and other support services to assist a user in retrieving virtual phone image 425 and other configuration information (e.g., policy configurations, additional mobile applications, etc.) from virtual phone provisioning service 215 of mobile management server 200 in IT department 115. Mobile application 410 further includes a management service 422 that once installed, continuously runs as a service on the host OS and periodically communicates with virtual phone leasing service, for example, in order to comply with various security policy settings for business mobile device 105 or to provide various updates (e.g., OS updates, customizations, new applications, etc.) to virtual phone image 425 of business mobile device 105. In one embodiment, because management service 422 is able to run in a higher privilege or security level due to its binding to enabler component 405, it cannot be manually terminated by the user of personal mobile device 100 (e.g., without such user obtaining root access, etc.).

[0021] FIG. 5 is a flow that illustrates a process for provisioning virtual phone image 425 for business mobile device 105 on personal mobile device 100. In step 500, a user purchases personal mobile device 100 including firmware OS 400 that includes enabler component 405. In step 505, the user, for example, using a mobile app store application already installed on personal mobile device 100 (or through alternative downloading means), purchases or otherwise downloads and installs mobile application package 410 on the host OS of personal mobile device 100. Upon installation of mobile application package 410, in step 510, the user launches provisioning tool 420 of mobile application package 410. In one embodiment, provisioning tool 420 provides a user interface to the user to input information into provisioning tool 420 that enables provisioning tool 420 to establish a connection (e.g., wireless) to virtual phone provisioning service 215. For example, an administrator of IT department may, via an out-of-band channel (e.g., orally, email, support ticket, etc.), provide the user a URL to input into provisioning tool 240 which identifies a network address (e.g., and listening port) of mobile management platform 200 and/or unique identifying information (e.g., user ID, etc.) that virtual phone provisioning service 215 can utilize to match a virtual phone image 425 that corresponds to the user. Alternatively, a user may alternatively provide such unique identifying information (e.g., enterprise username and password, etc.) to provisioning tool 420 or provisioning tool 420 may extract such a unique identifying information from personal mobile device 100 itself (e.g., user's cell phone number, etc.). Upon receipt of such unique identifying information from provisioning tool 420, virtual phone provisioning service 215 is able to identify a virtual phone image 425 that corresponds to the user. In an alternative embodiment, virtual phone provisioning service 215 may utilize push methodologies to transmit a push message to personal mobile device 100 that wakes-up provisioning tool 420 on personal mobile device 100 in order to establish a connection back to virtual phone provisioning service 215. In one such embodiment, such a push message may include unique identifying information corresponding to the user which provisioning tool 420 can transmit back to virtual phone provisioning service 215 to enable virtual phone provisioning service 215 to identify a virtual phone image 425 corresponding to the user (or alternatively, provisioning tool 420 can prompt the user for such unique identifying information, such as a username and password or extract such unique identifying information from personal mobile device 100, such as a cell phone number).

[0022] In step 515, provisioning tool 420, as described above, establishes a connection (e.g., wireless) with virtual phone provisioning service 215 and provides the unique identifying information to virtual phone provisioning service 215 to identify a virtual phone image 425 corresponding to the user. In step 520, virtual phone provisioning service 215 receives the unique identifying information and, in step 525, dynamically generates or otherwise identifies a previously stored default virtual phone image 425 corresponding to the unique identifying information (and thus, the user). For example, in one embodiment, virtual phone provisioning service 215 determines an identity of the user from the received unique identifying information and is able to identify a default virtual phone image 425 stored in a file system repository of mobile management database 225 that corresponds to the business group of the user (see, e.g., FIG. 3C). In step 530, virtual phone provisioning service 215 transmits virtual phone image 425 to provisioning tool 420. In one embodiment, such virtual phone image 425 is transmitted as a zip file. In step 535, virtual phone provisioning service 215 similarly identifies policy settings corresponding to the user's business group (see, e.g., FIG. 3D) as well as any additional mobile applications requested by the user (and supported by IT department 115) that are not included in virtual phone image 425, and in step 540, transmits the policy setting and additional mobile applications to provisioning tool 420. In one embodiment, communication between virtual phone provisioning service 215 and provisioning tool 420 during transmission of virtual phone image 425, business group policy settings, and additional mobile applications occurs through RESTful APIs (representational state transfer application programming interface). In steps 545 and 550, provisioning tool 420 receives virtual phone image 425, group policy settings and additional mobile applications, respectively. In one embodiment, provisioning tool 240 receives and stores virtual phone image 425, due to its size (e.g., 3 GBs or higher in some embodiments), on an external storage card of personal mobile device 100, such as an external microSD card or other similar small form factor mass storage devices. Alternative embodiments may store virtual phone image 425 in the internal memory (e.g., NAND flash memory or embedded eMMC/eSD memory chips) of personal mobile device 100. In step 555, provisioning tool 420 initializes business mobile device 105. For example, in one embodiment, during such initialization, provisioning tool 420 provides certain group policy settings received in step 550, such as lease settings, to management service 422 to initiate a periodic "leasing" communication with virtual phone leasing service 220 in accordance with the lease settings for the user's business group (see, e.g., FIG. 3D). Similarly, provisioning tool 420 may provide other group policy settings, such as password settings, to hypervisor 415 to enable hypervisor 415 to properly control password access to business mobile device 105. The initialization process may additionally install any additional mobile applications into virtual phone image 425. Once initialized, in step 560, the user may launch business mobile device 105 in a virtual machine supported by hypervisor 415 using virtual phone image 425. Similarly, once virtual phone image 425 has been delivered and installed on personal mobile device 100, at step 565, mobile management platform 200 may update a user profile corresponding to the user (see, e.g., FIG. 3B) to indicate that the user's business mobile device 105 has now been activated.

[0023] FIG. 6 is a flow that illustrates a process for establishing lease communications between a mobile management platform server 200 and a personal mobile device 100. As previously discussed, in certain embodiments, once virtual phone image 425 has been delivered, stored and installed, management service 422 of mobile application package 410 begins periodic "lease" communications with virtual phone leasing service 220 of mobile management platform 200. In certain embodiments, for security purposes, management service 422 runs in a privileged mode in the host OS of personal mobile device 100 such that management service 422 cannot be manually terminated by the user. In step 600, management service 422 initiates or starts a periodic timer for a lease interval, such as 12 hours (see, e.g., FIG. 3D). Upon expiration of the lease interval in step 605, management service 422 attempts to establish a connection with virtual phone leasing service 220. If, in step 610, a connection is successfully established, then in step 615, management service 422 communicates with virtual phone leasing service 220 and downloads any updates, changes and/or modifications to any settings for business mobile device 105 and modifies virtual phone image 425, hypervisor 415 settings (e.g., password security settings for business mobile device 105), management service 422 configuration settings (e.g., lease settings) and/or other settings and configurations accordingly. Such updates, changes, and/or modifications may include, for example, instructions to wipe business mobile device 105 from personal mobile device 100 (e.g., due to the user no longer being an employee at enterprise 115), new mobile applications to install on business mobile device 105, instructions to remove existing mobile applications from business mobile device 105, upgrades to the guest OS of business mobile device 105, changes to user settings and customizations for guest OS of business mobile device 105, changes to the group policy settings of the user, changes to shared preferences for mobile applications, and the like. In one embodiment, an administrator using mobile management platform server 200 may interact with user interface 205 to request any of the foregoing updates, changes and/or modifications to business mobile device 105, which are then queued until management service 422 successfully establishes a connection with virtual phone leasing service 220. After performing such updates, changes, and/or modifications by management service 422, in step 620, management service 422 resets its periodic timer and returns to step 605.

[0024] If, however, in step 610, a connection is not successfully established (e.g., due to a malicious user who has stolen personal mobile device 100 and turned off its wireless network capabilities), then in step 625, if a time period for an auto-wipe setting (e.g., 4 days in FIG. 3D) has elapsed, then in step 630, management service 422 will permanently delete or otherwise remove virtual phone image 425 from personal mobile device 100 thereby permanently wiping the existence of business mobile device 105 from personal mobile device 100 for security purposes. It should be recognized that the wiping of business mobile device 105 from personal mobile device 100 does not affect a user's ability to use personal mobile device 100. If, the time period for auto-wipe has not elapsed, then, in step 635, if a time period for an auto-disable setting (e.g., 1 day in FIG. 3D) has elapsed, then, in step 640, management service 422 will temporarily disable access by the user to business mobile device 105 until a connection with virtual phone leasing service has been re-established in step 610. It should be recognized that the flow of FIG. 6 for lease communications is merely exemplary and various alternatives may be made consistent with the teachings herein. For example, while FIG. 6 describes a "polling" technique in which management service 422 running on personal mobile device 100 initiates an attempt to establish communications with virtual phone leasing service 220 of mobile management platform 200, alternative embodiments may employ a push model, whereby virtual phone leasing service 220 utilizes a periodic timer to transmit push messages to management service 422 on personal mobile device 100 to request management service 422 to connect back to virtual phone leasing service 220.

[0025] Although one or more embodiments of the present invention have been described in some detail for clarity of understanding, it will be apparent that certain changes and modifications may be made within the scope of the claims. For example, while embodiments herein have referred to certain mobile operating systems such as Android, it should be recognized that any mobile operating systems may be utilizing in alternative embodiments such as Apple's iOS, Research in Motion's Blackberry OS, Microsoft's Windows Phone, Hewlett Packard's webOS, Symbian, Java, and the like. Similarly, while embodiments herein have generally utilized a smartphone as an example of a mobile device, it should be recognized that any potable device that has primary purposes of providing mobile computing or mobile data services to a user may utilize the techniques herein, including tablet computers and similar portable devices. It should further be recognized that use of certain terminology that may be more commonly used with certain operating systems than others is merely exemplary not meant to limit the scope of the teachings herein to any particular operating system and that corresponding functions and components in other operating system platforms may benefit from the teachings herein. Accordingly, the described embodiments are to be considered as illustrative and not restrictive, and the scope of the claims is not to be limited to details given herein, but may be modified within the scope and equivalents of the claims. In the claims, elements and/or steps do not imply any particular order of operation, unless explicitly stated in the claims.

[0026] The various embodiments described herein may employ various computer-implemented operations involving data stored in computer systems. For example, these operations may require physical manipulation of physical quantities--usually, though not necessarily, these quantities may take the form of electrical or magnetic signals, where they or representations of them are capable of being stored, transferred, combined, compared, or otherwise manipulated. Further, such manipulations are often referred to in terms, such as producing, identifying, determining, or comparing. Any operations described herein that form part of one or more embodiments of the invention may be useful machine operations. In addition, one or more embodiments of the invention also relate to a device or an apparatus for performing these operations. The apparatus may be specially constructed for specific required purposes, or it may be a general purpose computer selectively activated or configured by a computer program stored in the computer. In particular, various general purpose machines may be used with computer programs written in accordance with the teachings herein, or it may be more convenient to construct a more specialized apparatus to perform the required operations.

[0027] The various embodiments described herein may be practiced with other computer system configurations including hand-held devices, microprocessor systems, microprocessor-based or programmable consumer electronics, minicomputers, mainframe computers, and the like.

[0028] One or more embodiments of the present invention may be implemented as one or more computer programs or as one or more computer program modules embodied in one or more computer readable media. The term computer readable medium refers to any data storage device that can store data which can thereafter be input to a computer system--computer readable media may be based on any existing or subsequently developed technology for embodying computer programs in a manner that enables them to be read by a computer. Examples of a computer readable medium include a hard drive, network attached storage (NAS), read-only memory, random-access memory (e.g., a flash memory device), a CD (Compact Discs)--CD-ROM, a CD-R, or a CD-RW, a DVD (Digital Versatile Disc), a magnetic tape, and other optical and non-optical data storage devices. The computer readable medium can also be distributed over a network coupled computer system so that the computer readable code is stored and executed in a distributed fashion.

[0029] Virtualization systems in accordance with the various embodiments, may be implemented as hosted embodiments, non-hosted embodiments or as embodiments that tend to blur distinctions between the two, are all envisioned. Furthermore, various virtualization operations may be wholly or partially implemented in hardware. For example, a hardware implementation may employ a look-up table for modification of storage access requests to secure non-disk data.

[0030] Many variations, modifications, additions, and improvements are possible, regardless the degree of virtualization. The virtualization software can therefore include components of a host, console, or guest operating system that performs virtualization functions. Plural instances may be provided for components, operations or structures described herein as a single instance. Finally, boundaries between various components, operations and data stores are somewhat arbitrary, and particular operations are illustrated in the context of specific illustrative configurations. Other allocations of functionality are envisioned and may fall within the scope of the invention(s). In general, structures and functionality presented as separate components in exemplary configurations may be implemented as a combined structure or component. Similarly, structures and functionality presented as a single component may be implemented as separate components. These and other variations, modifications, additions, and improvements may fall within the scope of the appended claims(s).

* * * * *

File A Patent Application

  • Protect your idea -- Don't let someone else file first. Learn more.

  • 3 Easy Steps -- Complete Form, application Review, and File. See our process.

  • Attorney Review -- Have your application reviewed by a Patent Attorney. See what's included.