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United States Patent Application 20180010348
Kind Code A1
CRESTANI; Paul ;   et al. January 11, 2018

Floor Levelling Arrangement and Method Therefor

Abstract

The present invention relates to a settable material aligning arrangement that allows for settable material to be aligned to a desired level before the settable material sets. It can be used for ensuring that a poured concrete floor or shotcreted wall is levelled accurately. The settable material aligning arrangement is fixed to a support base and includes a base arrangement and an aligning formation that can be fixed at varying distances from each other by a coupling arrangement.


Inventors: CRESTANI; Paul; (New South Wales, AU) ; CRESTANI; Andrew; (New South Wales, AU)
Applicant:
Name City State Country Type

CRESTANI; Andrew
CRESTANI; Paul

Bronte
Gladesville, New South Wales

AU
AU
Family ID: 1000002917261
Appl. No.: 15/538883
Filed: May 11, 2016
PCT Filed: May 11, 2016
PCT NO: PCT/AU2016/000164
371 Date: June 22, 2017


Current U.S. Class: 1/1
Current CPC Class: E04G 21/10 20130101; E04B 5/32 20130101
International Class: E04G 21/10 20060101 E04G021/10; E04B 5/32 20060101 E04B005/32

Foreign Application Data

DateCodeApplication Number
May 12, 2015AU2015901718

Claims



1. A settable material aligning arrangement for facilitating the levelling of settable material on a support base using a settable material, the settable material aligning arrangement comprising: a) a base arrangement configured for being mounted securely on the support base, and b) an aligning formation configured for defining a plane at which the settable material is to be aligned; c) a coupling arrangement configured for coupling the base arrangement to the aligning formation in at least two or more positions at varying distances from the support base.

2. A settable material aligning arrangement as claimed in claim 1 wherein the coupling arrangement is configured for coupling the base arrangement to the aligning formation in an infinite number of positions between an extended position and a retracted position.

3. A settable material aligning arrangement as claimed in claim 2 wherein the coupling arrangement comprises engaging formations on one or more selected from the base arrangement and the aligning formation, and complementary engaging formations on the other selected from the base arrangement and the aligning formation.

4. A settable material aligning arrangement as claimed in claim 3 wherein the coupling arrangement comprises locking formations for facilitating the locking of the base arrangement and aligning formation in a selected position operationally.

5. A settable material aligning arrangement as claimed in claim 4 wherein the locking formations comprise one or more selected from apertures and recesses configured for receiving a fastener.

6. A settable material aligning arrangement as claimed in claim 5 wherein the coupling arrangement comprises one or more selected from: a) a socket and spigot formation; b) a sliding formation; c) a threaded formation; and d) a bayonet formation.

7. A settable material aligning arrangement as claimed in claim 6 wherein the aligning formation comprises a spigot formation.

8. A settable material aligning arrangement as claimed in claim 7 wherein the spigot formation defines external threaded formations.

9. A settable material aligning arrangement as claimed in claim 7 wherein the spigot formation comprises one or more selected from an aperture and a recess configured for receiving a fastener.

10. A settable material aligning arrangement as claimed in claim 9 wherein the aligning formation comprises zones of engineered weakness, rendering the aligning formation frangible along those zones.

11. A settable material aligning arrangement as claimed in claim 10 wherein the zones of engineered weakness are configured for facilitating the breaking off of at least a portion of the aligning formation after setting of the settable material in operation, to thereby remove evidence of the settable material aligning arrangement located in the set settable material.

12. A settable material aligning arrangement as claimed in claim 11 wherein the aligning formation comprises engaging formations for engaging with a tool to break the aligning formation along the zones of engineered weakness.

13. A settable material aligning arrangement as claimed in claim 12 wherein the engaging formations are configured for engaging with one or more selected from a screwdriver and a suitably engineered tool.

14. A settable material aligning arrangement as claimed in claim 13 wherein the base arrangement comprises a base formation defining a flat surface for abutment against the support base.

15. (canceled)

16. (canceled)

17. (canceled)

18. (canceled)

19. (canceled)

20. (canceled)

21. (canceled)

22. (canceled)

23. (canceled)

24. (canceled)

25. A method of aligning settable material on a support base, the method comprising a) providing at least one or more settable material aligning arrangements as claimed in claim 1; b) securely fastening said at least one or more settable material aligning arrangements to a support base on which a settable material is to be applied; c) adjusting the distance of the aligning formation from the of at least two of the fastened settable material aligning arrangements to be in alignment with each other; d) pouring settable material onto the support base up to the same level of the aligning formation of the settable material aligning arrangements that have been levelled with each other.

26. A method as claimed in claim 25 wherein the method comprises the step of applying vibration to the settable material.

27. A method as claimed in claim 26 wherein the method comprises the step of smoothing the settable material to align with the aligning formations of at least one or more settable material aligning arrangements.

28. A method as claimed in claim 27 wherein the method comprises the step of supporting at least one or more structures on at least one or more holding formations.

29. A method as claimed in claim 28 wherein the method comprises the step of breaking a first zone of engineered weakness on an aligning formation to adjust the length of the aligning formation.

30. A method as claimed in claim 28 wherein the method comprises the step of breaking a second zone of engineered weakness on an aligning formation to adjust the length of the aligning formation
Description



FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0001] The present invention relates to a settable material aligning arrangement and method therefor.

[0002] The invention has been developed primarily for use in the construction of concrete floors and will be described hereinafter with reference to this application. However, it will be appreciated that the invention is not limited to this particular field of use.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0003] Currently when floors are poured from settable material such as cement, concrete, grout or the like, a laser level, automatic level or similar, is provided that sets the level of the floor at a datum distance from the floor. As the settable material is poured, a workman moves around the floor, using a tape measure to measure the requisite distance downwardly of the laser level, to ensure that the settable material has reached the required height.

[0004] This method of testing the floor level is not accurate, and an inaccurately poured floor may result in the finished product being defective and requiring costly repairs. Also, while the workman moves around the floor, this may disturb the poured settable material, resulting in ripples and an imperfect floor. Similar problems may be encountered when shotcreting settable material such as cement onto walls.

[0005] The follow-on effects of not having a perfectly level floor poured initially may require that an additional layer of screed or cement will need to be poured on top of the floor. This adds weight to a construction, and requires additional costly manpower and floor levelling compound such as compounds sold under the trade name Ardit.TM.. In extreme cases, the floor may be required to be pulled up, or grinded down.

[0006] Such errors stand out more where the floor being poured is for use as a burnished or polished concrete slab.

[0007] It is an objective of the present invention to provide a settable material aligning arrangement, which will overcome or substantially ameliorate at least some of the deficiencies of the prior art, or to at least provide an alternative.

[0008] It is to be understood that, if any prior art information is referred to herein, such reference does not constitute an admission that the information forms part of the common general knowledge in the art, in Australia or any other country.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0009] According to a first aspect, the present invention may be said to consist in a settable material aligning arrangement suitable for facilitating the levelling of settable material on a support base using a settable material, the settable material aligning arrangement comprising: [0010] a. a base arrangement configured for being mounted securely on the support base, and [0011] b. an aligning formation configured for defining a level at which the floor is to be poured; [0012] c. a coupling arrangement configured for coupling the base arrangement to the aligning formation in at least two or more positions at varying heights from the support base. [0013] Coupling Arrangement

[0014] In one embodiment, the coupling arrangement is configured for coupling the base arrangement to the aligning formation in an infinite number of positions between an extended position and a retracted position.

[0015] In one embodiment, the coupling arrangement comprises engaging formations on one or more selected from the base arrangement and the aligning formation, and complementary engaging formations on the other selected from the base arrangement and the aligning formation.

[0016] In one embodiment, the coupling arrangement comprises locking formations for facilitating the locking of the base arrangement and aligning formation in a selected position operationally.

[0017] In one embodiment, the locking formations comprise one or more selected from apertures and recesses configured for receiving a fastener.

[0018] In one embodiment, the coupling arrangement comprises one or more selected from: [0019] a. a socket and spigot formation; [0020] b. a sliding formation; [0021] c. a threaded formation; and [0022] d. a bayonet formation. [0023] Aligning formation

[0024] In one embodiment, the aligning formation comprises a spigot formation.

[0025] In one embodiment, the spigot formation defines external threaded formations.

[0026] In one embodiment, the aligning formation comprises zones of engineered weakness, rendering the aligning formation frangible along those zones.

[0027] In one embodiment, the zones of engineered weakness are configured for facilitating the breaking off of at least a portion of the aligning formation after setting of the settable material in operation, to thereby remove evidence of the settable material aligning arrangement located in the set settable material.

[0028] In one embodiment, the aligning formation comprises engaging formations for engaging with a tool to break the aligning formation along the zones of engineered weakness.

[0029] In one embodiment, the engaging formations configured for engaging with a screwdriver or other suitably engineered tool.

[0030] In one embodiment, the aligning formation is integrally moulded. [0031] Base Arrangement

[0032] In one embodiment, the base arrangement comprises a base formation defining a flat surface for abutment against the support base.

[0033] In one embodiment, the base arrangement comprises a plurality of legs extending from a base formation.

[0034] In one embodiment, the base arrangement comprises fastening formations configured for facilitating the fastening the base arrangement securely to the support base.

[0035] In one embodiment, the fastening formations comprise one or more selected from holes and apertures configured for receiving fasteners.

[0036] In one embodiment, the base arrangement comprises a socket formation.

[0037] In one embodiment, the socket formation defines internal threaded formations configured for threaded engagement with the external threaded formations of the spigot formation.

[0038] In one embodiment, the spigot formation comprises one or more selected from an aperture and a recess configured for receiving a fastener.

[0039] In one embodiment, the base arrangement is integrally moulded.

[0040] In one embodiment, the settable material aligning arrangement comprises at least one or more holding formations configured for holding a conduit at a vertical distance from a surface on which the base formation is being supported.

[0041] In one embodiment, the holding formations are configured for holding any one or more selected from: [0042] a. a conduit; [0043] b. a pipe, [0044] c. reinforcing bar; [0045] d. mesh; and [0046] e. any other structure.

[0047] In one embodiment, the holding formations define a recess configured for receiving at least one or more conduits.

[0048] In one embodiment, the holding formations define at least one or more clipping formations configured for securing a conduit in place once it has been received into the recess.

[0049] In one embodiment, the settable material aligning arrangement comprises a plurality of holding formations.

[0050] According to a further aspect, the present invention may be said to consist in a method of aligning a settable material on a support base, the method comprising [0051] a. providing at least one or more settable material aligning arrangements as described; [0052] b. securely fastening said at least one or more settable material aligning arrangements to a support base on which a settable material is to be poured to set as a level floor; [0053] c. adjusting the distance of the aligning formation of at least two or more of the fastened settable material aligning arrangements to be in alignment with each other; [0054] d. pouring settable material onto the support base up to the same level of the aligning formation of the settable material aligning arrangements that have been levelled with each other.

[0055] In one embodiment, the method comprises the step of applying vibration to the settable material.

[0056] In one embodiment, the method comprises the step of applying a patting motion to the aligned surface of the settable material until it settles at the level of the levelled aligning formations.

[0057] In one embodiment, the method comprises the step of smoothing the settable material to align with the aligning formations of at least one or more settable material aligning arrangements.

[0058] In one embodiment, the method comprises the step of supporting at least one or more structures on at least one or more holding formations.

[0059] In one embodiment, the method comprises the step of breaking a first zone of engineered weakness on an aligning formation to adjust the length of the aligning formation.

[0060] In one embodiment, the method comprises the step of breaking a second zone of engineered weakness on an aligning formation to adjust the length of the aligning formation.

[0061] This invention may also be said broadly to consist in the parts, elements and features referred to or indicated in the specification of the application, individually or collectively, and any or all combinations of any two or more of said parts, elements or features, and where specific integers are mentioned herein which have known equivalents in the art to which this invention relates, such known equivalents are deemed to be incorporated herein as if individually set forth.

[0062] Other aspects of the invention are also disclosed.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0063] Notwithstanding any other forms which may fall within the scope of the present invention, preferred embodiments of the invention will now be described, by way of example only, with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

[0064] FIG. 1 shows a top front perspective assembly view of a first embodiment of a settable material aligning arrangement;

[0065] FIG. 2 shows a side cutaway view of the first embodiment of a settable material aligning arrangement;

[0066] FIG. 3 shows a top rear perspective assembly view of the first embodiment of a settable material aligning arrangement;

[0067] FIG. 4 shows a top front perspective assembly view of a second embodiment of a settable material aligning arrangement;

[0068] FIG. 5 shows a side cutaway view of the second embodiment of a settable material aligning arrangement;

[0069] FIG. 6 shows a top rear perspective assembly view of a second embodiment of a settable material aligning arrangement;

[0070] FIG. 7 shows a side cutaway view of the second embodiment of a settable material aligning arrangement installed in a poured floor;

[0071] FIG. 8 shows a side cutaway view of the second embodiment of a settable material aligning arrangement installed in a floor with a portion of the aligning formation above the zones of engineered weakness removed;

[0072] FIG. 9 shows a top perspective view of a second embodiment of an aligning formation;

[0073] FIG. 10 shows a side view of a third embodiment of an aligning formation of FIG. 9;

[0074] FIG. 11 shows a top perspective view of a third embodiment of a base arrangement;

[0075] FIG. 12 shows a side view of a third embodiment of a base arrangement of FIG. 11; and

[0076] FIG. 13 shows a side cutaway view of a fourth embodiment of a settable material aligning arrangement installed in a poured floor.

DESCRIPTION OF EMBODIMENTS

[0077] With reference to the above drawings, in which similar features are generally indicated by similar numerals, a settable material aligning arrangement according to a first aspect of the invention is generally indicated by the numeral 1000. [0078] Apparatus

[0079] In one embodiment now described, there is provided a settable material aligning arrangement 1000 for facilitating the pouring of settable material 3000 (shown in FIGS. 7 and 8) onto a support base 2000 to form a level floor when the settable material 3000 sets. While the invention is described below with reference to its application in the levelling of a concrete or cement floor, it is envisaged that the same invention can be applied for use where any settable material is applied to a support base, and that the support base need not necessarily be horizontally aligned. For example the support base can be a wall that is being shotcreted, or a wall on which plaster is being applied, whether manually or in an automated fashion. Any reference to the word "levelling" is intended to encompass the broader concept of general alignment in a required mutual plane.

[0080] The settable material aligning arrangement 1000 comprises a base arrangement 1100 configured for being mounted securely on the support base, and an aligning formation 1200 configured for defining the plane at which the floor is to be poured to.

[0081] The base arrangement 1100 and the aligning formation 1200 are coupled to each other by a coupling arrangement 1300. The coupling arrangement is configured for coupling the base arrangement 1100 to the aligning formation 1200 in preferably an infinite number of positions between an extended position in which the aligning formation is further from the support base 2000, and a retracted position in which the aligning formation is closer to the support base 2000, by means of complementary threaded formations as will be discussed in more detail below.

[0082] In the embodiments shown in the figures, the coupling arrangement 1300 comprises engaging formations associated with the base arrangement 1100 and complementary engaging formations associated with the aligning formation 1200. In the embodiments shown in the figures, the engaging formations are a spigot and socket arrangement 1310, with the socket 1330 being defined by and coupled to the base arrangement 1100, while the spigot 1320 is defined by and coupled to the aligning formation 1200. The socket 1330 is preferably tubular in shape, and the spigot 1320 is preferably also tubular in shape, and dimensioned for being received within the socket 1330. The spigot 1320 defines external threaded formations 1322, while the socket 1330 defines internal threaded formations 1332 configured for complementary engagement with the external threaded formations 1322 operationally.

[0083] It will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the arrangement of the spigot and socket arrangement 1310 can be reversed with respect to the base arrangement 1100 and the aligning formation 1200. For example, the spigot 1320 may be attached to the base arrangement 1100, and the socket being associated with the aligning formation 1200.

[0084] It will further be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the coupling arrangement 1300 could comprise a wide variety of configurations, including but not limited to a sliding formation; a sliding formation with a tightening mechanism, a tightly fitting sliding formation, a threaded formation; and/or a bayonet-type formation.

[0085] It is anticipated that, once the coupling arrangement 1300 has been used to set the height of the aligning formation 1200 from the base support, as will be discussed in more detail below, the coupling arrangement 1300 will be locked in that preferred position, to prevent the aligning formation 1200 being accidentally displaced. In the preferred embodiments shown in figures, the coupling arrangement 1300 comprises locking formations in the form of an aperture or hole 1340 configured for receiving a fastener 1342 (shown in FIG. 3) such as a screw or nail, which can be inserted into the spigot 1322 lock the base arrangement 1100 and aligning formation 1200 in a selected position operationally.

[0086] In a preferred embodiment shown in FIGS. 11 and 12, the locking formations include a pair of ridges 1350 extending vertically along the socket 1330. It is envisaged that a screw may easily be screwed through the socket 1330, using the pair of ridges 1350 as a guide.

[0087] It is anticipated that the hole 1340 could be replaced by a recessed slot (not shown) in an alternative embodiment.

[0088] It is further anticipated that alternative means for locking the coupling arrangement can be provided, for example in the form of a bonding resin or a more complex locking arrangement. However, the illustrated embodiments are preferred for reasons of reduction of complexity and cost.

[0089] In addition to the spigot 1320, the aligning formation 1200 shown in the figures comprises a disc 1220 defining a flat alignment surface 1230, against which the settable material 3000 is aligned in operation at an aligned surface.

[0090] In a preferred embodiment, the aligning formation 1200 comprises zones of engineered weakness 1210. In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 4-6, the zones of engineered weakness 1210 are configured as a slot in the outer wall of the spigot 1320 above the external threaded formations 1322. The zones of engineered weakness 1210 render the aligning formation frangible along those zones, and allowing the aligning formation 1200 to be broken off at predetermined locations or lines by application of force to the aligning formation 1200 to thereby remove evidence of the settable material aligning arrangement located in the settable material 3000 after it has set, as will be discussed in more detail below.

[0091] As shown in FIGS. 4-6, in order to assist in the rupturing of the zones of engineered weakness 1210, the aligning formation 1200 comprises engaging formations in the form of a pair of apertures 1222 in the disc 1220. The apertures 1222 are configured for engagement by a tool--for example a tool comprising two protrusions configured for snug engagement in the apertures 1222, and which includes a lever arm for applying torque to the aligning formation 1200 about a vertical axis to thereby cause the zone of engineered weakness 1210 to rupture, and allowing an upper part of the aligning formation 1200 to be removed after the settable material 3000 has set. In this way, the base arrangement 1100 and the lower portion of the aligning formation 1200 are hidden within the set settable material 3000, and no evidence of their existence shows in the aligned surface of the settable material 3000 except for a small hole which can be filled in with a small amount of additional settable material 3000. It is envisaged that the upper part of the aligning formation 1200 above the zones of engineered weakness can be removed during the pour, or once the settable material has at least partially set.

[0092] It is further envisaged that more than one zones of engineered weakness 1210 can be provided along the length of the aligning formation 1200, as shown in FIGS. 9 and 10. In the aligning formation 1200 shown in FIGS. 9 and 10, the additional zone of engineered weakness 1210 can be used for reducing the overall length of the aligning formation 1200 before connecting the aligning formation 1200 to the base arrangement 1100 using the coupling arrangement 1300. In this way, a single piece aligning formation 1200 can be used for application in pouring a wide range of concrete floor widths.

[0093] In another embodiment shown in FIGS. 9 and 10, it is envisaged that the engaging formations could, for example be a star shaped or linearly shaped recess 1224 configured for engaging with a screwdriver or the like.

[0094] It is anticipated that the aligning formation 1200 will preferably be composed of plastic and integrally moulded in one piece in preferably an injection moulding process, although other moulding processes are also envisaged. Similarly, it is anticipated that the base arrangement 1100 will be composed of plastic and integrally moulded in one piece in a moulding process. However, in an alternative embodiment, it is envisaged that either of the aligning formation 1200 or the base arrangement 1100, or both, can be composed of any other suitable material, including but not limited to aluminum, steel, glass or wood.

[0095] It is further envisaged that either or both of the aligning formation 1200 or the base arrangement 1100 can be integrally moulded by means of injection moulding, rotary moulding or any other suitable moulding. In addition, it is envisaged that either or both of the aligning formation 1200 or the base arrangement 1100 can be cast in a mould, or printed in a 3 dimensional printing process.

[0096] As mentioned previously, the base arrangement 1100 comprises the socket 1330 of the coupling arrangement 1300. In addition, the base arrangement 1100 comprises a base formation 1110, shown in FIGS. 4-6 as an annular ring 1116 and in FIGS. 1-3 as linear tabs or strips 1114. The annular ring 1116 defines a flat surface for abutment against the support base 2000. The annular ring 1116 further defines fastening formations in the form of apertures 1112 for receiving fasteners 1117 such as screws or nails which may be fastened into the support base 2000 to secure the base arrangement 1100 to the support base 2000 before pouring of the settable material 3000. It is anticipated that alternative fastening formations can be provided, such as recesses, slots or the like.

[0097] In the preferred embodiment shown in the figures, the base arrangement 1100 further comprises a plurality of legs 1120 extending from the base formation 1110. The legs 1120 are configured to support the socket 1330 of the coupling arrangement 1300. It is envisaged that in an alternative embodiment (not shown) the socket 1330 could extend directly from a base formation such as a flange, however the use of an open structure, such as that shown in the figures, is preferred as it allows settable material to penetrate in between the legs 1120, and to set in this position, in order to permanently secure the base arrangement 1100 in position and bolster the strength of the floor once it has set. In this way, the integrity of the floor is not compromised by a reduction in strength around the base arrangement 1100. In addition, it is envisaged that the fire resistance and/or soundproofing of the poured floor will also not be compromised.

[0098] In another embodiment shown in FIG. 13, it is envisaged that the base arrangement 1100 can include lugs 1118 that extend downwardly in operation from the base formation 1110. The lugs 1118 are preferably configured with an aperture thousand 119 or recess in order to receive the fasteners 1117 in operation. In this way, the entire length of the base formation 1110 will not be visible from underneath the concrete slab once it is poured.

[0099] Further, and as shown in FIG. 13, it is envisaged that the settable material aligning arrangement 1000 can include one or more holding formations 1400 configured for holding elongate or any other required structures such as water pipes, electrical conduits, networking conduits, reinforcing bars, and mesh or other similar reinforcement, that are to be installed in the same construction, at a distance from the support base when concrete is being poured or applied in operation. In this way, the settable material aligning arrangement 1000 can provide a dual function of facilitating the aligning the plane of the concrete floor, and facilitating the securing of conduits 400000 and the like during pouring of the concrete floor as will be described in more detail below. The holding formations 1400 are preferably shaped as a preferably V shaped recess 1410 defining inner tapered surfaces that are configured for receiving a conduit from a vertically superior position. The holding formations 1400 preferably also comprise at least a pair of resilient clipping formations 1420 for securing the conduit in place once it has been received. The inner tapered surfaces of the recess 1410 allow for conduits of variable sizes to be received within the recess 1410.

[0100] In a preferred embodiment the holding formations 1400 are integrally moulded with the base arrangement 1100. In another embodiment (not shown) the holding formations 1400 can be integrally moulded with the aligning formation 1200, although this is not preferred. [0101] In Use

[0102] In use, it is anticipated that base arrangements 1100 will initially be secured to the support base 2000 by inserting fasteners such as pegs, screws or nails through apertures 1112 into the support base in order to securely fasten each of the base arrangements 1100 to the support base 2000. It should be noted that the support base can be earth, into which such fasteners can be driven, or could be wooden shuttering, or a wall.

[0103] Once the base arrangements 1100 have been fastened to the support base 2000, an aligning formation 1200 will be screwed into each of the base arrangements 1100. At this stage, a laser alignment device and/or tape measure may be used in order to set the alignment of the alignment surface 1230 at the aligned surface level of the floor to be poured, and in the same plane as each other.

[0104] Once the aligning formation is 1200 have been set at the correct distance from the support base, these are locked in position by inserting a fastener such as a screw or nail (not shown) through hole 1340 and into the spigot 1320 of the coupling arrangement 1300 in order to ensure that the distance of the aligned surface 1230 from the support base 2000 does not change.

[0105] After this, the settable material 3000, (which can be, for example, material including but not limited to concrete, cement or screeding and as shown in FIGS. 7 and 8 as 3000) is poured onto the support base 2000 up to a level flush with the flat aligned surface 1230 of the aligning formation 1200. Levelling tools such as a concrete vibrator and/or a straight flat plank or levelling tool (not shown) can be used to help the settable material 3000 settle and penetrate into the base arrangement 1100. In a preferred embodiment, each settable material aligning arrangement 1000 will be installed at a distance from each other that is slightly less than the length of any such levelling tool that is to be used. The levelling tool can then be rested between two of the settable material aligning arrangements 1000 to test the level of the aligned surface of the floor being poured.

[0106] Once the settable material 3000 has set sufficiently to allow access to the settable material aligning arrangements 1000, a tool such as the one described above can be used to apply a talk to the aligning formation 1200 to fracture or rupture the zones of engineered weakness, and remove the upper portion of the aligning formation, leaving a small hole H as shown in FIG. 8. The small hole H can be filled in by judicious application of a small amount of filler material, resulting in a level poured floor.

[0107] It will be further appreciated by those skilled in the art that the settable material aligning arrangement 1000 need not necessarily be used to align the alignment surfaces in a single coplanar plane that is parallel to the support base. Instead, it is envisaged that slopes and undulations in the aligned surface can be created accurately and smoothly by setting the aligning formation of the settable material aligning arrangement 1000 at required various distances from the support base.

Interpretation

Base

[0108] The term "base" in this specification is defined to mean a conceptual structure or entity on which something draws or depends, and does not necessarily require a low or lower horizontal position or orientation.

Markush Groups

[0109] In addition, where features or aspects of the invention are described in terms of Markush groups, those skilled in the art will recognise that the invention is also thereby described in terms of any individual member or subgroup of members of the Markush group.

[0110] Chronological Sequence

[0111] For the purpose of this specification, where method steps are described in sequence, the sequence does not necessarily mean that the steps are to be carried out in chronological order in that sequence, unless there is no other logical manner of interpreting the sequence.

Embodiments

[0112] Reference throughout this specification to "one embodiment" or "an embodiment" means that a particular feature, structure or characteristic described in connection with the embodiment is included in at least one embodiment of the present invention. Thus, appearances of the phrases "in one embodiment" or "in an embodiment" in various places throughout this specification are not necessarily all referring to the same embodiment, but may. Furthermore, the particular features, structures or characteristics may be combined in any suitable manner, as would be apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art from this disclosure, in one or more embodiments.

[0113] Similarly it should be appreciated that in the above description of example embodiments of the invention, various features of the invention are sometimes grouped together in a single embodiment, figure, or description thereof for the purpose of streamlining the disclosure and aiding in the understanding of one or more of the various inventive aspects. This method of disclosure, however, is not to be interpreted as reflecting an intention that the claimed invention requires more features than are expressly recited in each claim. Rather, as the following claims reflect, inventive aspects lie in less than all features of a single foregoing disclosed embodiment. Thus, the claims following the Detailed Description of Specific Embodiments are hereby expressly incorporated into this Detailed Description of Specific Embodiments, with each claim standing on its own as a separate embodiment of this invention.

[0114] Furthermore, while some embodiments described herein include some but not other features included in other embodiments, combinations of features of different embodiments are meant to be within the scope of the invention, and form different embodiments, as would be understood by those in the art. For example, in the following claims, any of the claimed embodiments can be used in any combination.

Different Instances of Objects

[0115] As used herein, unless otherwise specified the use of the ordinal adjectives "first", "second", "third", etc., to describe a common object, merely indicate that different instances of like objects are being referred to, and are not intended to imply that the objects so described must be in a given sequence, either temporally, spatially, in ranking, or in any other manner.

Specific Details

[0116] In the description provided herein, numerous specific details are set forth. However, it is understood that embodiments of the invention may be practiced without these specific details. In other instances, well-known methods, structures and techniques have not been shown in detail in order not to obscure an understanding of this description.

Terminology

[0117] In describing the preferred embodiment of the invention illustrated in the drawings, specific terminology will be resorted to for the sake of clarity. However, the invention is not intended to be limited to the specific terms so selected, and it is to be understood that each specific term includes all technical equivalents which operate in a similar manner to accomplish a similar technical purpose. Terms such as "forward", "rearward", "radially", "peripherally", "upwardly", "downwardly", and the like are used as words of convenience to provide reference points and are not to be construed as limiting terms.

[0118] For the purposes of this specification, the term "plastic" shall be construed to mean a general term for a wide range of synthetic or semisynthetic polymerization products, and generally consisting of a hydrocarbon-based polymer.

[0119] As used herein the term "and/or" means "and" or "or", or both.

[0120] As used herein "(s)" following a noun means the plural and/or singular forms of the noun.

Comprising and Including

[0121] In the claims which follow and in the preceding description of the invention, except where the context requires otherwise due to express language or necessary implication, the word "comprise" or variations such as "comprises" or "comprising" are used in an inclusive sense, i.e. to specify the presence of the stated features but not to preclude the presence or addition of further features in various embodiments of the invention.

[0122] Any one of the terms: including or which includes or that includes as used herein is also an open term that also means including at least the elements/features that follow the term, but not excluding others. Thus, including is synonymous with and means comprising.

Scope of Invention

[0123] Thus, while there has been described what are believed to be the preferred embodiments of the invention, those skilled in the art will recognize that other and further modifications may be made thereto without departing from the spirit of the invention, and it is intended to claim all such changes and modifications as fall within the scope of the invention. For example, any formulas given above are merely representative of procedures that may be used. Functionality may be added or deleted from the block diagrams and operations may be interchanged among functional blocks. Steps may be added or deleted to methods described within the scope of the present invention.

[0124] Although the invention has been described with reference to specific examples, it will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the invention may be embodied in many other forms.

INDUSTRIAL APPLICABILITY

[0125] It is apparent from the above, that the arrangements described are applicable to the construction industries.

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