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United States Patent Application 20180049132
Kind Code A1
Gorgenyi; Frank ;   et al. February 15, 2018

Coalescing Geo-Fence Events

Abstract

A device location is determined, and the location of an area of interest that is a geographic area referred to as a geo-fence is identified. Multiple geo-fences can be identified by the device, and different geo-fences can be associated with different programs on the device. An operating system of the device implements multiple different periods of operation for the device, including a conservation period during which certain programs are not typically scheduled to run, and an execution period during which such programs are typically scheduled to run. A system identifies geo-fence events, which occur when the device enters or exits the geo-fence. The system maintains a record of the geo-fence events for each of multiple geo-fences, and provides to a program selected ones of those geo-fence events at a time when the program is scheduled to run on the device during an execution period of the operating system.


Inventors: Gorgenyi; Frank; (Bremerton, WA) ; Estrada Alva; Daniel; (Kirkland, WA) ; Gonzalez; Fernando; (Bellevue, WA) ; Saha; Sanjib; (Sammamish, WA)
Applicant:
Name City State Country Type

Microsoft Technology Licensing, LLC

Redmond

WA

US
Assignee: Microsoft Technology Licensing, LLC
Redmond
WA

Family ID: 1000002951613
Appl. No.: 15/726724
Filed: October 6, 2017


Related U.S. Patent Documents

Application NumberFiling DatePatent Number
13918818Jun 14, 20139820231
15726724

Current U.S. Class: 1/1
Current CPC Class: H04W 52/0251 20130101; H04W 4/021 20130101; H04W 4/022 20130101
International Class: H04W 52/02 20060101 H04W052/02; H04W 4/02 20060101 H04W004/02

Claims



1. (canceled)

2. A method comprising: detecting when one or more geo-fence events occur for a computing device during a conservation period of an operating system during which certain programs are not scheduled to run; collecting geo-fence events for each of multiple geo-fences together for each of the certain programs; and maintaining a record of the collected geo-fence events for each of the multiple geo-fences while waiting until a program associated with at least one of the multiple geo-fences is scheduled to run during an execution period of the operating system.

3. The method as recited in claim 2, wherein the conservation period is when the computing device is operating in a power saving mode.

4. The method as recited in claim 2, wherein the conservation period and the execution period are scheduled for the program based on one or more of: when the program was last scheduled to run, another program that is scheduled to run, available power of the computing device, and whether a geo-fence has been detected for the program.

5. The method as recited in claim 2, further comprising selecting one or more of the collected geo-fence events to provide to the program during the execution period.

6. The method as recited in claim 5, wherein the one or more geo-fence events include a most recent entering event and a most recent exiting event for each geo-fence associated with the program.

7. The method as recited in claim 2, wherein maintaining the record of the geo-fence events comprises replacing a previously recorded geo-fence event of a type with a newly detected geo-fence event of the type.

8. The method as recited in claim 2, further comprising providing, to the program, the collected geo-fence events for the program when the program is scheduled to run during the execution period of the operating system.

9. The method as recited in claim 2, further comprising providing, to the program, the collected geo-fence events for the program when the program is activated by a user.

10. The method as recited in claim 2, wherein the detecting comprises determining whether criteria related to a state of the computing device has been satisfied.

11. A computing device comprising: one or more processors; a data store to store geo-fence data for multiple geo-fences, the geo-fence data for a geo-fence including an indication of a program associated with the geo-fence; and one or more computer-readable storage devices comprising computer-readable instructions which, when executed by the one or more processors, implement: a geo-fence event detection module to detect when one or more geo-fence events occur during a conservation period of an operating system during which certain programs are not scheduled to run; and a geo-fence event storage module to: collect geo-fence events for each of multiple geo-fences together for each of the certain programs, and maintain a record of the geo-fence events for each of the multiple geo-fences while waiting until a program associated with at least one of the multiple geo-fences is scheduled to run during an execution period.

12. The computing device as recited in claim 11, wherein the one or more computer-readable storage devices further implements a scheduling mechanism that schedules conservation periods and execution periods for the certain programs.

13. The computing device as recited in claim 11, wherein the one or more computer-readable storage devices further implements a geo-fence event reporting module that provides, to the program, the record of the geo-fence events associated with the program during the execution period.

14. The computing device as recited in claim 11, wherein the one or more computer-readable storage devices further implements a geo-fence event reporting module that selects one or more of the geo-fence events for each geo-fence associated with the program.

15. The computing device as recited in claim 14, wherein the one or more selected geo-fences are a most recent enter event and a most recent exit event for each geo-fence.

16. The computing device as recited in claim 14, wherein the one or more selected geo-fences are selected based on a criteria for the geo-fence being satisfied.

17. A method comprising: detecting when one or more geo-fence events occur for a computing device during a conservation period of an operating system during which certain programs are not scheduled to run; maintaining a record of geo-fence events for each of multiple geo-fences; collecting the geo-fence events for each of the multiple geo-fences together for each of the certain programs; waiting until a program associated with at least one of the multiple geo-fences is scheduled to run during an execution period of the operating system; and providing, to the program, the collected geo-fence events for the program when the program is scheduled to run during the execution period of the operating system.

18. The method as recited in claim 17, wherein the conservation period and the execution period are scheduled for the program based on one or more of: when the program was last scheduled to run, another program that is scheduled to run, available power of the computing device, and whether a geo-fence has been detected for the program.

19. The method as recited in claim 17, wherein the detecting comprises determining that criteria related to a state of the computing device has been satisfied.

20. The method as recited in claim 17, wherein the collected geo-fences are selected based on a criteria for the collected geo-fences being satisfied.

21. The method as recited in claim 17, wherein the providing the collected geo-fence events comprises providing only a most recent enter event and exit event.
Description



RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application is a continuation of and claims priority to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/918,818 entitled "Coalescing Geo-Fence Events" and filed Jun. 14, 2013, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.

BACKGROUND

[0002] As computing technology has advanced, increasingly powerful mobile devices have become available. For example, smart phones have become commonplace. The mobility of such devices has resulted in different types of functionality being developed, such as location-based functionality in which certain actions are taken by the device based on the location of the device. While this functionality has many benefits, it is not without its problems. One such problem is that a program may attempt to be notified of the location of the device more frequently than programs are expected to be notified. This can result in device controls regarding the frequency with which programs are expected to be run being circumvented, which leads to increased power usage and reduced battery life in the device and thus a poor user experience when using the device.

SUMMARY

[0003] This Summary is provided to introduce a selection of concepts in a simplified form that are further described below in the Detailed Description. This Summary is not intended to identify key features or essential features of the claimed subject matter, nor is it intended to be used to limit the scope of the claimed subject matter.

[0004] In accordance with one or more aspects, the occurrence of one or more geo-fence events for a computing device during a conservation period of an operating system during which certain programs are not scheduled to run is detected. A record of geo-fence events for each of multiple geo-fences is maintained. When a program associated with at least one of the multiple geo-fences is scheduled to run during an execution period of the operating system, an indication of one or more geo-fence events for the at least one of the multiple geo-fences from the record of geo-fence events is provided to the program.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0005] The same numbers are used throughout the drawings to reference like features.

[0006] FIG. 1 illustrates an example system in which the coalescing geo-fence events discussed herein can be used.

[0007] FIG. 2 is a block diagram illustrating an example system implementing the coalescing geo-fence events in accordance with one or more embodiments.

[0008] FIG. 3 illustrates an example user interface that can be displayed to a user to allow the user to select whether locations are to be determined in accordance with one or more embodiments.

[0009] FIG. 4 illustrates an example of different periods of operation in accordance with one or more embodiments.

[0010] FIG. 5 is a flowchart illustrating an example process for coalescing geo-fence events in accordance with one or more embodiments.

[0011] FIG. 6 illustrates an example system that includes an example computing device that is representative of one or more systems and/or devices that may implement the various techniques described herein.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0012] Coalescing geo-fence events is discussed herein. The location of a computing device is determined, and the location of an area of interest is identified. The area of interest is a geographic area that is also referred to as a geo-fence. Multiple geo-fences can be identified by the computing device, and different geo-fences can be associated with different programs on the computing device. An operating system of the computing device implements multiple different periods of operation for the computing device, including a conservation period during which certain programs are not typically scheduled to run, and an execution period during which such programs are typically scheduled to run. A system of the computing device identifies geo-fence events, which occur when the computing device enters or exits the geo-fence. The system maintains a record of the geo-fence events for each of multiple geo-fences, and provides to a program selected ones of those geo-fence events (e.g., the geo-fence events for the most recent entering and exiting of each geo-fence associated with the program) at a time when the program is scheduled to run on the computing device during an execution period of the operating system.

[0013] FIG. 1 illustrates an example system 100 in which the coalescing geo-fence events discussed herein can be used. The system 100 includes a computing device 102, which can be any of a variety of types of devices, although typically is a mobile device. For example, the computing device 102 can be a smart phone or other wireless phone, a laptop or netbook computer, a tablet or notepad computer, a wearable computer, a mobile station, an entertainment appliance, an audio and/or video playback device, a game console, an automotive computer, and so forth. The computing device 102 is typically referred to as being a mobile device because the device 102 is designed or intended to be moved to multiple different locations (e.g., taken by a user with him or her as the user goes to different locations).

[0014] The location of the computing device 102 can be determined using any of a variety of different techniques, such as wireless networking (e.g., Wi-Fi) triangulation, cellular positioning, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) positioning, network address (e.g., Internet Protocol (IP) address) positioning, and so forth as discussed in more detail below. Different location determination techniques can have different accuracy errors or associated uncertainties. For example, a location determination technique may be accurate to 10 meters (m) or 10 kilometers (km). The exact position of the computing device 102 is thus not pinpointed, but is illustrated as an area 104 surrounding the computing device 102. The area 104 represents the uncertainty in the determined location or position of the computing device 102, so although the computing device is determined to be at a particular location or position (e.g., approximately the center of the area 104), the computing device 102 may actually be anywhere within the area 104.

[0015] The system 100 also illustrates multiple geo-fences 112, 114, 116, and 118. Each geo-fence 112-118 can be any of a variety of different places of interest to the computing device 102, to the user of the computing device 102, to a program running on the computing device 102, and so forth. For example, a geo-fence 112-118 can be the user's home, the user's workplace, restaurants or businesses that may be visited by the user, educational facilities, public services (e.g., hospitals or libraries), geographic places (e.g., cities or states), and so forth.

[0016] The location of geo-fences 112-118 is maintained in or otherwise accessible to the computing device 102. It should be noted that different users of the computing device 102 can optionally have different geo-fences maintained or accessed.

[0017] The computing device 102 is mobile and can enter and exit geo-fences 112-118. At any given time, the computing device 102 can be within one of geo-fences 112-118, or within no geo-fence. If the computing device 102 is determined to be within the area that encompasses a particular geo-fence, then the computing device 102 is referred to as being inside or within that particular geo-fence. However, if the computing device 102 is determined to not be within the area that encompasses a particular geo-fence, then the computing device 102 is referred to as being outside or not within that particular geo-fence. Situations can also arise in which two or more geo-fences overlap, in which case the computing device 102 can be within two or more geo-fences 112-118 at one time. It should be noted that the illustration of FIG. 1 is not to scale, and that geo-fences 112-118 can be, and typically are, significantly larger in size than the computing device 102.

[0018] In the illustrated example, the area 104 does not intersect any of the geo-fences 112-118, and thus the computing device 102 is outside each of the geo-fences 112-118. However, if the area 104 were to at least partially overlap one of the geo-fences 112-118, then the computing device 102 is possibly inside the geo-fence that is overlapped. Whether the computing device 102 is determined to be inside the geo-fence or outside the geo-fence in such situations can be determined in various manners, such as based on the presence of an overlap, how much of the geo-fences overlap, and so forth.

[0019] FIG. 2 is a block diagram illustrating an example system 200 implementing the coalescing geo-fence events in accordance with one or more embodiments. The system 200 can be implemented by a single device such as the computing device 102 of FIG. 1, or alternatively multiple devices such as the computing device 102 and one or more server computers accessed via a network (e.g., a cellular or other wireless phone network, the Internet, etc.). The system 200 includes one or more location determination modules 202, a geo-fence determination module 204, a geo-fence event detection module 206, a geo-fence triggering module 208, and a data store 210.

[0020] The data store 210 maintains various data used by the techniques discussed herein. The data store 210 can be implemented using any of a variety of different storage devices, such as system memory (e.g., random access memory (RAM)), Flash memory or other solid state memory, magnetic disks, optical discs, and so forth. The data maintained in the data store 210 identifies multiple geo-fences, including geo-fence data 220 for each of multiple geo-fences. Geo-fence data 220 can be obtained from various sources, such as from a distributer or reseller of the data store 210 that stores the data on the data store 210, from a program running on a computing device implementing the system 200, from another device or service, and so forth. The geo-fence data for a geo-fence describes the boundary of the geo-fence, as well as the criteria to be satisfied in order for the geo-fence to be triggered.

[0021] The criteria to be satisfied can refer to a device entering the geo-fence, exiting the geo-fence, staying within the geo-fence for a particular amount of time (e.g., at least a threshold amount of time, no more than a threshold amount of time, etc.), a time period for the geo-fence (e.g., a start time and end time, a start time and a duration), combinations thereof, and so forth. Various additional criteria can optionally be included as well, such as system state to be satisfied. For example, the criteria can include whether the display of the computing device is turned on or off, whether the computing device has network connectivity (e.g., Internet connectivity), a power state of the computing device (e.g., whether the computing device has at least a threshold amount of battery life remaining), and so forth.

[0022] One or more actions that are taken in response to the geo-fence being triggered (the criteria being satisfied) can also be included as part of the geo-fence data. Any of a variety of actions can be taken when a geo-fence is triggered, such as a particular program being notified, particular content being displayed or otherwise played back by the computing device, the geo-fence data being deleted from the data store 210, combinations thereof, and so forth. Multiple different actions can be taken based on the manner in which the geo-fence is triggered, such as one action taken in response to the device entering the geo-fence, and another action taken in response to the device exiting the geo-fence.

[0023] The boundary of the geo-fence can be specified in any of a variety of different manners. For example, the geo-fence can be specified as a position (e.g., latitude and longitude coordinates) and a radius, as a set of positions (e.g., latitude and longitude coordinates of corners of the geo-fence), as a series of vectors, and so forth. In the discussions herein, reference is made to the geo-fences being approximately circular in shape. However, it should be noted that the geo-fences can be any of a variety of regular geometric shapes (e.g., triangles, rectangles, octagons, and so forth), other geometric shapes (e.g., freeform shapes or blobs), and so forth.

[0024] The data store 210 is illustrated in FIG. 2 as being part of the system 200. It should be noted that the data maintained in the data store 210 can be obtained from the programs 230 (e.g., from the programs 230 as they are loaded in a computing device implementing the system 200). Alternatively, one or more of the programs 230 can include a data store that is used in addition to, or in place of, the data store 210.

[0025] The geo-fences can be used in a variety of different manners. For example, a geo-fence and action to be taken can be to alert a user of a computing device implementing at least part of the system 200 when they are approaching a bus stop, to give the user a coupon when they enter a shopping mall or store, to notify a parent when their child has left school or entered their home, to display weather information for a current location when the user travels to a different city, and so forth.

[0026] The data maintained in the data store 210 can also include additional data used with the techniques discussed herein. For example, the data store 210 can include a record of geo-fence events 222, which are geo-fence events detected by the geo-fence event detection module 206 as discussed in more detail below.

[0027] The location determination modules 202 include one or more modules that determine the location of the computing device 102. In the illustrated example, the location determination modules 202 include a Wi-Fi module 212, a GNSS module 214, a network address module 216, and a cellular module 218. It should be noted, however, that these modules 212-218 are examples and that the location determination modules 202 need not include each of the modules 212-218 and/or that the location determination modules 202 can include one or more additional modules that determine a location of the computing device 102 in different manners. For example, the location determination modules can include MEMS (Microelectromechanical systems), cameras, microphones, and so forth.

[0028] The Wi-Fi module 212 uses Wi-Fi signals, such as triangulation of Wi-Fi signals, to determine the location of the computing device 102. The Wi-Fi module 212 can receive signals from various wireless access points, including an identifier of a particular wireless access point and/or a particular wireless network from which a signal is received. For example, a wireless access point may send a media access control (MAC) address of the wireless access point, a basic service set identifier (BSSID) of a wireless network supported by the wireless access point, and so forth. The Wi-Fi module 212 can also measure a strength (e.g., received signal strength indicator (RSSI) values) of these received signals. It should be noted that the Wi-Fi module 212 can, at any given time for any given position of the computing device, receive signals from multiple wireless access points. The Wi-Fi module 212 can maintain or otherwise access a record of wireless access points, signal strengths, and corresponding locations to determine the location of the computing device at any particular time given the wireless access points from which signals are received and the strength of those signals at the particular given time. Alternatively, the Wi-Fi module 212 can provide an indication of the wireless access points from which signals are received and the strength of those signals at a particular given time to a remote service (e.g., accessed via any of a variety of different types of networks) that determines and returns to the Wi-Fi module 212 an indication of the location of the computing device at that particular given time.

[0029] The GNSS module 214 uses GNSS positioning to determine the location of the computing device 102, determining a location of the computing device based on a particular number of satellites (e.g., four or more satellites) from which the GNSS module 214 can receive signals or otherwise communicate. The GNSS module 214 can implement the GNSS functionality using a variety of different technologies, including but not limited to the Global Positioning System (GPS), the Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS), the BeiDou (or Compass) navigation system, the Galileo positioning system, combinations thereof, and so forth. The GNSS module 214 operates in any of a variety of public and/or proprietary manners to determine, given the one or more satellites from which the GNSS module 214 can receive signals or otherwise communicate at any particular given time, the location of the computing device at that particular given time.

[0030] The network address module 216 uses network address positioning to determine the location of the computing device 102. The network address used can be any of a variety of network addresses, such as the IP address of the computing device. The network address module 216 can maintain or otherwise access a record of IP addresses or address ranges and corresponding locations to determine the location of the computing device at any particular time given the IP address assigned to the computing device at the particular given time. Alternatively, the network address module 216 can provide an indication of the IP address of the computing device at a particular given time to a remote service (e.g., accessed via any of a variety of different types of networks) that determines and returns to the network address module 216 an indication of the location of the computing device at that particular given time.

[0031] The cellular module 218 uses cellular positioning to determine the location of the computing device 102. The cellular module 218 can receive signals from various cell transceivers, including an identifier of a particular cell transceiver (e.g., a cell tower or transceiver identifier) from which a signal is received. The cellular module 218 can also measure a strength of these received signals. It should be noted that the cellular module 218 can, at any given time for any given position of the computing device, receive signals from multiple cell transceivers. The cellular module 218 can maintain or otherwise access a record of cell transceivers, signal strengths, and corresponding locations to determine the location of the computing device at any particular time given the cell transceivers from which signals are received and the strength of those signals at the particular given time. Alternatively, the cellular module 218 can provide an indication of the transceivers from which signals are received and the strength of those signals at a particular given time to a remote service (e.g., accessed via any of a variety of different types of networks) that determines and returns to the cellular module 218 an indication of the location of the computing device at that particular given time. Additionally or alternatively, the cellular module 218 can monitor state changes at low power and provide notifications (e.g., to the geo-fence event detection module 206), allowing movement detections at low power without requiring continuous polling.

[0032] The locations determined by the location determination modules 202 are typically latitude and longitude coordinates, although the location can alternatively be specified in other manners. Each of the location determination modules 202 has an associated uncertainty in the location that it determines, also referred to as an accuracy error or estimated accuracy error of the location. The amount of this uncertainty can be determined in various manners, such as being reported by the location determination module itself, being pre-configured in or otherwise accessible to other modules of the system 200 (e.g., the geo-fence event detection module 206), and so forth. The uncertainty results in a position uncertainty area for the location determined by a location determination module, the position uncertainty area being an area within which the computing device 102 may actually be for the determined location. In one or more embodiments, the position uncertainty area is an approximately circular area with the location determined by the location determination module being approximately the center of the circular area, and the radius of the approximately circular area being an error radius determined as the uncertainty for the location determination module. Alternatively, the position uncertainty area can be described using various other regular or other geometric shapes. Thus, a position uncertainty area for a location determination module can be a spatial error distribution function. An approximation of the spatial error distribution function can be a flat distribution over an area, although various other approximations or descriptions of the spatial error distribution function can alternatively be used.

[0033] In one more embodiments, a location is determined by the location determination modules 202 only after receiving user consent to do so. This user consent can be an opt-in consent, where the user takes an affirmative action to request that the location be determined by the location determination modules 202 before any such location is determined. Alternatively, this user consent can be an opt-out consent, where the user takes an affirmative action to request that the location not be determined by the location determination modules 202. If the user does not choose to opt out of determining the location, then it is an implied consent by the user to determine his or her location. Furthermore, it should be noted that the location determined by the location determination modules 202 can be maintained in a computing device receiving the determined location (e.g., the computing device 102 of FIG. 1) and need not be communicated to other devices or services.

[0034] Alternatively, user consent may be granted for specific programs and revoked for other programs. In this case, location information will be determined only when the user has consented for at least one program for which geo-fence tracking is used. The location information is used to determine the entry and/or exit of only those geo-fences belonging to the consented programs. Remaining geo-fences from the unapproved programs are not tracked.

[0035] FIG. 3 illustrates an example user interface that can be displayed to a user to allow the user to select whether locations are to be determined in accordance with one or more embodiments. A location control window 300 is displayed including a description 302 explaining to the user why the location information is being determined. A link 304 to a privacy statement is also displayed. If the user selects the link 304, a privacy statement of the system 200 is displayed, explaining to the user how the user's information is kept confidential.

[0036] Additionally, the user is able to select a radio button 306 to opt-in to the determining of location information, or a radio button 308 to opt-out of the determining of location information. Once a radio button 306 or 308 is selected, the user can select an "OK" button 310 to have the selection saved. It is to be appreciated that radio buttons and an "OK" button are only examples of user interfaces that can be presented to a user to opt-in or opt-out of the determining of location information, and that a variety of other conventional user interface techniques can alternatively be used. The system 200 of FIG. 2 then proceeds to determine the location of the computing device, or not determine the location of the computing device, in accordance with the user's selection.

[0037] Returning to FIG. 2, the geo-fence determination module 204 determines one or more of the geo-fences identified in the data store 210 for which a determination is to be made as to whether the geo-fence is triggered. Data for numerous different geo-fences can be maintained in the data store 210, and one or more of those geo-fences is selected by the geo-fence determination module 204. The geo-fence determination module 204 can make this determination in a variety of different manners, such as based on a current distance between the geo-fences and the computing device, based on sizes of (areas encompassed by) the geo-fences, based on which geo-fence is most (or nearly most) stringent as discussed in more detail below, and so forth. The one or more geo-fences that are determined by the module 204 are those deemed more likely to be entered or exited based on various criteria, such as the current location of the computing device, and those one or more geo-fences can be the focus of the module 204 until the criteria changes. However, it should be noted that the geo-fence determination module 204 can determine whether a geo-fence is triggered for any of the geo-fences in the data store 210.

[0038] The geo-fence event detection module 206 obtains a current location of the computing device at regular or irregular intervals, and detects whether a geo-fence event occurs. These intervals can be selected dynamically based on current conditions (e.g., approximate distance to a closest geo-fence, power budget for the computing device, an estimated speed of movement of the computing device, and so forth). A geo-fence event refers to the device entering the geo-fence, exiting the geo-fence, or staying in the geo-fence for a particular amount of time (e.g., being in the geo-fence and not exiting the geo-fence). The geo-fence event detection module 206 can evaluate the uncertainty associated with the determined location relative to the size of the geo-fence in order to determine whether the computing device is inside the geo-fence or outside the geo-fence. Alternatively, the geo-fence event detection module 206 can use the location determined by a location determination module to determine whether the computing device is inside the geo-fence or outside the geo-fence without regard for the uncertainty associated with the determined location. The geo-fence event detection module 206 can also track whether the computing device is inside or outside the geo-fence over time, and thus knows whether the computing device has moved from inside the geo-fence to outside the geo-fence, whether the computing device has moved outside the geo-fence to inside the geo-fence, an amount of time that the computing device has been inside the geo-fence, and so forth.

[0039] The geo-fence detection module 206 includes a geo-fence event storage module 224, and in response to a geo-fence event being detected by the module 206, the geo-fence event storage module 224 stores the detected geo-fence event in the geo-fence event record 222. The geo-fence event record 222 can be implemented in a variety of different manners, such as a database, a list of geo-fence events per geo-fence, and so forth. Storing the detected geo-fence event refers to storing data identifying the geo-fence event and optionally various aspects of the geo-fence event. The data stored for the detected geo-fence event can include an indication of whether the geo-fence event is entering a geo-fence or exiting a geo-fence, an indication of (e.g., identifier of) the geo-fence entered or exited, a duration that the computing device was in (or has been in) a geo-fence, a program associated with the geo-fence (e.g., a program to be notified of the geo-fence event), a timestamp (e.g., date and/or time) of when the geo-fence event was detected, and so forth. The stored data can also identify the geo-fence for which the geo-fence event is detected, or the geo-fence events can be stored in a manner in which the identification of the geo-fence for which the geo-fence event is detected is inherent (e.g., the geo-fence events can be added to a list for the geo-fence, each geo-fence having a different list). The duration that the computing device was in or has been in a geo-fence can be determined in different manners, such as by the geo-fence event detection module 206 monitoring how long it has been since a geo-fence was entered, by determining the time that has elapsed since the last geo-fence event entering the geo-fence was detected (or the time that elapsed between the most recent geo-fence event exiting the geo-fence was detected and the preceding geo-fence event entering the geo-fence was detected), and so forth.

[0040] In one or more embodiments, each geo-fence event detected by the geo-fence event detection module 206 is stored in the data store 210, for example in an ordered list sorted by the time of occurrence of the geo-fence event. The geo-fence event record 222 can include geo-fence events for different durations, such as the past 24 hours, the past week, and so forth. Alternatively, the geo-fence event record 222 can include, for each geo-fence event, the most recent geo-fence event exiting the geo-fence and the most recent geo-fence event entering the geo-fence. Each time a new geo-fence event is detected for a geo-fence, the previously recorded geo-fence event of the same type (exiting or entering the geo-fence) can be replaced by the newly detected geo-fence event. Thus, in some embodiments only the most recent geo-fence event exiting the geo-fence and the most recent geo-fence event entering the geo-fence for a geo-fence are recorded, while in other embodiments multiple geo-fence entering and exiting events are recorded for a geo-fence (e.g., all geo-fence entering and exiting events are recorded). The recorded geo-fence events for a geo-fence may also be removed from the data store 210 in response to various events, such as the application that provided the geo-fence data for the geo-fence being uninstalled or otherwise removed from the system 200).

[0041] The geo-fence triggering module 208 analyzes the criteria associated with a geo-fence and determines whether the criteria are satisfied. This determination is made based at least in part on the occurrence of one or more geo-fence events as determined by the geo-fence event detection module 206. In response to the criteria being satisfied, the module 208 determines that the geo-fence is triggered and takes the appropriate action. The action taken can be associated with geo-fence data for the triggered geo-fence stored in the data store 210, or can be determined in other manners such as being pre-configured in the geo-fence triggering module 208, being obtained from another module or device, and so forth.

[0042] In one or more embodiments, the action taken by the geo-fence triggering module 208 in response to the geo-fence being triggered is to notify one or more programs 230 that the geo-fence was triggered. The one or more programs 230 can include various different types of programs, such as applications, operating system modules or components, and so forth. The one or more programs 230 to be notified (also referred to as the programs 230 associated with the triggered geo-fence) can be identified in different manners, such as being configured in the geo-fence triggering module 208, being identified as part of the geo-fence data for the geo-fence in the data store 210, being obtained from another module or service, and so forth. A program 230 can be notified of the geo-fence event that occurred, as well as optionally additional information (e.g., that the computing device was within a geo-fence for at least a threshold amount of time). The program 230 can then take the action it desires based on the geo-fence being triggered.

[0043] The geo-fence triggering module 208 includes a geo-fence event reporting module 226 that manages notifying programs that a geo-fence was triggered. The geo-fence event reporting module 226 selects one or more geo-fence events from geo-fence event record 222, such as for each geo-fence associated with a program 230 the most recent geo-fence exit event (the most recent geo-fence event that is exiting the geo-fence) and the most recent geo-fence enter event (the most recent geo-fence event that is entering the geo-fence). The geo-fence event reporting module 226 coalesces geo-fence events for each geo-fence associated with a program 230, and provides to the program 230 a collection of geo-fence events for geo-fences associated with the program 230.

[0044] In one or more embodiments, a geo-fence is triggered in response to a geo-fence event (entering or exiting the geo-fence), and the geo-fence event reporting module 226 notifies the program of that geo-fence event. Alternatively, the geo-fence event reporting module 226 can take into account other criteria associated with the geo-fence in determining whether to notify the program of the geo-fence event, and notify the program only if such additional criteria are satisfied. For example, if the criteria indicates that Internet connectivity is desired but no Internet access is currently available, then the geo-fence reporting module 226 would not notify the program of the geo-fence event. This other criteria can be stored as part of the geo-fence event record 222 and/or geo-fence data 220.

[0045] Furthermore, the geo-fence event reporting module 226 can take into account any criteria associated with the program itself. For example, if the criteria indicates that the program to be notified is not to run during certain times of the day, then the geo-fence reporting module 226 would not notify the program of the geo-fence event if it happens during those certain times of the day.

[0046] Additionally, situations can arise where the geo-fence event reporting module 226 does not notify the program 230 about certain geo-fence events, such as automatic expiration of a geo-fence. For example, if a geo-fence is valid only for a specific time period (e.g., a daily deal for a store that closes at 9 pm), then the geo-fence can be automatically removed from the system 200 once it expires, and the program 230 associated with the geo-fence may not be notified of this removal event.

[0047] In one or more embodiments, the program 230 that is associated with a geo-fence is a program on the computing device implementing the system 200. An operating system of the computing device implementing the system 200 implements multiple different periods of operation for the computing device. These multiple different periods of operation include a conservation period in which the computing device is operating in a power saving mode. During the conservation period, certain programs (such as applications other than operating system programs) are not typically scheduled to run and various other power saving techniques can be employed by the operating system to reduce power usage of the computing device. The multiple different periods of operation also include an execution period in which the computing device is operating in an execution mode. During the execution period, programs that are not typically scheduled during the conservation period are scheduled to run by a scheduling mechanism of the operating system. The scheduling mechanism can take into account various different factors to determine which program is to run and how long the program is to run, such as how recently the program was last scheduled to run, how long the program ran the last time the program was scheduled to run (or over some past time duration), other programs to be scheduled, available power (e.g., remaining battery life) of the computing device, whether a user request to run the program is received, and so forth. It should be noted that the scheduling mechanism operates independently of the system 200--the scheduling mechanism can take into account whether geo-fence events have been detected for a program in determining when to schedule the program, but the scheduling mechanism need not (and typically does not) schedule a program to run simply in response to a geo-fence event associated with the program being detected.

[0048] FIG. 4 illustrates an example of different periods of operation in accordance with one or more embodiments. A timeline 402 is illustrated including interspersed execution periods 404 and conservation periods 406. During execution periods 404 the operating system is operating in the execution mode, and during conservation periods 406 the operating system is operating in the power saving mode. Although illustrated as having the same time duration, it should be noted that different execution periods 404 can have different durations and that different conservation periods 406 can have different durations. These durations of the execution periods 404 and/or conservation periods 406 can vary over time during operation of the computing device.

[0049] Returning to FIG. 2, the geo-fence event reporting module 226 coalesces geo-fence events for each geo-fence associated with a program 230, and provides to the program 230 a collection of geo-fence events for geo-fences associated with the program 230 when the program 230 is later scheduled to run. The collection of geo-fence events (e.g., sorted chronologically starting with most recent event) can be provided to the program 230 the next time that the program 230 is scheduled to run, or alternatively a subsequent time. The times when the program 230 is scheduled to run can be controlled by the scheduling mechanism of the operating system, and may be in the next execution period or some later execution period. It should be noted that during both execution and conservation periods, the geo-fence event detection module 206 operates to detect geo-fence events and the geo-fence event storage module 224 stores the detected geo-fence events in the geo-fence event record 222. Thus, even though a program 230 that is to be notified of the detected geo-fence events is not running or is not scheduled to run (or the operating system is in the conservation period), geo-fence events for geo-fences associated with the program are still being detected and recorded, and can be provided to the program 230 when the program 230 is later run. Once the geo-fence events are received by the program 230, they can be subsequently removed from the data store 210.

[0050] Although illustrated as modules separate from the location determination modules 202, it should be noted that one or more of the modules 204-208 can alternatively be implemented at least in part in one of the location determination modules 202. For example, at least part of one or more of the modules 204-208 can be implemented in hardware components of the GNSS module 214 or the Wi-Fi module 212.

[0051] FIG. 5 is a flowchart illustrating an example process 500 for coalescing geo-fence events in accordance with one or more embodiments. The process 500 is carried out by a system, such as the system 200 of FIG. 2, and can be implemented in software, firmware, hardware, or combinations thereof. The process 500 is shown as a set of acts and is not limited to the order shown for performing the operations of the various acts. The process 500 is an example process for coalescing geo-fence events; additional discussions of coalescing geo-fence events are included herein with reference to different figures.

[0052] In process 500, geo-fence event occurrences for a computing device are detected (act 502). The occurrence of a geo-fence event is based on the location of the computing device as determined by one or more of the location determination modules 202 of FIG. 2, and the locations of the various geo-fences is identified in the geo-fence data in the data store 210.

[0053] A record of the detected geo-fence events is maintained (act 504). The record of detected geo-fence events that is maintained can include various information identifying the geo-fence event and optionally various aspects of the geo-fence event as discussed above.

[0054] An indication of one or more geo-fence events detected for at least one geo-fence associated with a program are provided to the program when the program is run (act 506), and the program can then perform various operations based on the indicated geo-fences as the program desires. The indication of the one or more geo-fence events can take various forms, such as the information identifying the geo-fence event and various aspects of the geo-fence event that is maintained in the data store 210 of FIG. 2, an identifier of a location in the data store 210 where the information identifying the geo-fence event is stored, and so forth. The indication can be provided to the program using various mechanisms, such as the program requesting geo-fence events from the system 200 of FIG. 2, the system 200 automatically notifying the program of the geo-fence events (e.g., by invoking an application programming interface of the program or other callback function), and so forth.

[0055] The time when the program is run in act 506 is determined by a scheduling mechanism of the operating system as discussed above. It should be noted that the program can be waiting to be scheduled or not running at all when the geo-fence events are detected. The detected geo-fence events are provided to the program in act 506 (e.g., immediately) if the program is already running, or are provided to the program in act 506 the next time the program runs. The next time the program runs may be determined in different manners. For example, the program may be run when activated by a user, or when determined by a scheduling mechanism of the operating system. If multiple instances of the same program are run at the same time, only one instance of the program can be provided with the geo-fence events to avoid duplication of event delivery and the resultant duplicate action from the program on receipt of a particular geo-fence event. In one or more embodiments, the one or more geo-fence events are the most recent geo-fence enter event and the most recent geo-fence exit event for each geo-fence associated with the program (or at least each geo-fence associated with the program for which geo-fence events are detected).

[0056] Thus, the geo-fence events for multiple geo-fences associated with a program are coalesced and provided to the program as an ordered collection of geo-fence events in act 506. Furthermore, by providing the geo-fence events to the program when the program is run based on the scheduling mechanism of the operating system, the providing of the geo-fence events to the program is harmonized with the scheduling mechanism of the operating system. Mechanisms to provide geo-fence events to the program separate from the scheduling mechanism are not employed, preventing the scheduling mechanism from being circumvented and preventing conservation periods from being interrupted due to detected geo-fence events.

[0057] The techniques discussed herein thus support use of geo-fences in a manner that conserves power and prevents abuse by various programs. By coalescing geo-fence events and harmonizing the geo-fence events with the scheduling mechanism of the operating system, the scheduling mechanism of the operating system cannot be circumvented by a program having numerous geo-fences that are triggered. The techniques also provide a most recent geo-fence enter and geo-fence exit event to a program, providing current geographically relevant information to the program.

[0058] Although particular functionality is discussed herein with reference to particular modules, it should be noted that the functionality of individual modules discussed herein can be separated into multiple modules, and/or at least some functionality of multiple modules can be combined into a single module. Furthermore, it should be noted that a particular module discussed herein as performing an action includes that particular module itself performing the action, or alternatively that particular module invoking or otherwise accessing another component or module that performs the action (or performs the action in conjunction with that particular module). Thus, a particular module performing an action includes that particular module itself performing the action and/or another module invoked or otherwise accessed by that particular module performing the action.

[0059] FIG. 6 illustrates an example system generally at 600 that includes an example computing device 602 that is representative of one or more systems and/or devices that may implement the various techniques described herein. The computing device 602 may be, for example, a server of a service provider, a device associated with a client (e.g., a client device), an on-chip system, and/or any other suitable computing device or computing system.

[0060] The example computing device 602 as illustrated includes a processing system 604, one or more computer-readable media 606, and one or more I/O Interfaces 608 that are communicatively coupled, one to another. Although not shown, the computing device 602 may further include a system bus or other data and command transfer system that couples the various components, one to another. A system bus can include any one or combination of different bus structures, such as a memory bus or memory controller, a peripheral bus, a universal serial bus, and/or a processor or local bus that utilizes any of a variety of bus architectures. A variety of other examples are also contemplated, such as control and data lines.

[0061] The processing system 604 is representative of functionality to perform one or more operations using hardware. Accordingly, the processing system 604 is illustrated as including hardware elements 610 that may be configured as processors, functional blocks, and so forth. This may include implementation in hardware as an application specific integrated circuit or other logic device formed using one or more semiconductors. The hardware elements 610 are not limited by the materials from which they are formed or the processing mechanisms employed therein. For example, processors may be comprised of semiconductor(s) and/or transistors (e.g., electronic integrated circuits (ICs)). In such a context, processor-executable instructions may be electronically-executable instructions.

[0062] The computer-readable media 606 is illustrated as including memory/storage 612. The memory/storage 612 represents memory/storage capacity associated with one or more computer-readable media. The memory/storage 612 may include volatile media (such as random access memory (RAM)) and/or nonvolatile media (such as read only memory (ROM), Flash memory, optical disks, magnetic disks, and so forth). The memory/storage 612 may include fixed media (e.g., RAM, ROM, a fixed hard drive, and so on) as well as removable media (e.g., Flash memory, a removable hard drive, an optical disc, and so forth). The computer-readable media 606 may be configured in a variety of other ways as further described below.

[0063] Input/output interface(s) 608 are representative of functionality to allow a user to enter commands and information to computing device 602, and also allow information to be presented to the user and/or other components or devices using various input/output devices. Examples of input devices include a keyboard, a cursor control device (e.g., a mouse), a microphone (e.g., for voice inputs), a scanner, touch functionality (e.g., capacitive or other sensors that are configured to detect physical touch), a camera (e.g., which may employ visible or non-visible wavelengths such as infrared frequencies to detect movement that does not involve touch as gestures), and so forth. Examples of output devices include a display device (e.g., a monitor or projector), speakers, a printer, a network card, tactile-response device, and so forth. Thus, the computing device 602 may be configured in a variety of ways as further described below to support user interaction.

[0064] Computing device 602 also includes a geo-fence system 614. Geo-fence system 614 provides various geo-fence functionality, including coalescing geo-fence, as discussed above. Geo-fence system 614 can implement, for example, the system 200 of FIG. 2.

[0065] Various techniques may be described herein in the general context of software, hardware elements, or program modules. Generally, such modules include routines, programs, objects, elements, components, data structures, and so forth that perform particular tasks or implement particular abstract data types. The terms "module," "functionality," and "component" as used herein generally represent software, firmware, hardware, or a combination thereof. The features of the techniques described herein are platform-independent, meaning that the techniques may be implemented on a variety of computing platforms having a variety of processors.

[0066] An implementation of the described modules and techniques may be stored on or transmitted across some form of computer-readable media. The computer-readable media may include a variety of media that may be accessed by the computing device 602. By way of example, and not limitation, computer-readable media may include "computer-readable storage media" and "computer-readable signal media."

[0067] "Computer-readable storage media" refers to media and/or devices that enable persistent storage of information and/or storage that is tangible, in contrast to mere signal transmission, carrier waves, or signals per se. Thus, computer-readable storage media refers to non-signal bearing media. The computer-readable storage media includes hardware such as volatile and non-volatile, removable and non-removable media and/or storage devices implemented in a method or technology suitable for storage of information such as computer readable instructions, data structures, program modules, logic elements/circuits, or other data. Examples of computer-readable storage media may include, but are not limited to, RAM, ROM, EEPROM, flash memory or other memory technology, CD-ROM, digital versatile disks (DVD) or other optical storage, hard disks, magnetic cassettes, magnetic tape, magnetic disk storage or other magnetic storage devices, or other storage device, tangible media, or article of manufacture suitable to store the desired information and which may be accessed by a computer.

[0068] "Computer-readable signal media" refers to a signal-bearing medium that is configured to transmit instructions to the hardware of the computing device 602, such as via a network. Signal media typically may embody computer readable instructions, data structures, program modules, or other data in a modulated data signal, such as carrier waves, data signals, or other transport mechanism. Signal media also include any information delivery media. The term "modulated data signal" means a signal that has one or more of its characteristics set or changed in such a manner as to encode information in the signal. By way of example, and not limitation, communication media include wired media such as a wired network or direct-wired connection, and wireless media such as acoustic, RF, infrared, and other wireless media.

[0069] As previously described, hardware elements 610 and computer-readable media 606 are representative of instructions, modules, programmable device logic and/or fixed device logic implemented in a hardware form that may be employed in some embodiments to implement at least some aspects of the techniques described herein. Hardware elements may include components of an integrated circuit or on-chip system, an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), a complex programmable logic device (CPLD), and other implementations in silicon or other hardware devices. In this context, a hardware element may operate as a processing device that performs program tasks defined by instructions, modules, and/or logic embodied by the hardware element as well as a hardware device utilized to store instructions for execution, e.g., the computer-readable storage media described previously.

[0070] Combinations of the foregoing may also be employed to implement various techniques and modules described herein. Accordingly, software, hardware, or program modules and other program modules may be implemented as one or more instructions and/or logic embodied on some form of computer-readable storage media and/or by one or more hardware elements 610. The computing device 602 may be configured to implement particular instructions and/or functions corresponding to the software and/or hardware modules. Accordingly, implementation of modules as a module that is executable by the computing device 602 as software may be achieved at least partially in hardware, e.g., through use of computer-readable storage media and/or hardware elements 610 of the processing system. The instructions and/or functions may be executable/operable by one or more articles of manufacture (for example, one or more computing devices 602 and/or processing systems 604) to implement techniques, modules, and examples described herein.

[0071] As further illustrated in FIG. 6, the example system 600 enables ubiquitous environments for a seamless user experience when running applications on a personal computer (PC), a mobile device, and/or other devices. Services and applications run substantially similar in these environments for a common user experience when transitioning from one device to the next while utilizing an application, playing a video game, watching a video, and so on.

[0072] In the example system 600, multiple devices are interconnected through a central computing device. The central computing device may be local to the multiple devices or may be located remotely from the multiple devices. In one or more embodiments, the central computing device may be a cloud of one or more server computers that are connected to the multiple devices through a network, the Internet, or other data communication link.

[0073] In one or more embodiments, this interconnection architecture enables functionality to be delivered across multiple devices to provide a common and seamless experience to a user of the multiple devices. Each of the multiple devices may have different physical requirements and capabilities, and the central computing device uses a platform to enable the delivery of an experience to the device that is both tailored to the device and yet common to all devices. In one or more embodiments, a class of target devices is created and experiences are tailored to the generic class of devices. A class of devices may be defined by physical features, types of usage, or other common characteristics of the devices.

[0074] In various implementations, the computing device 602 may assume a variety of different configurations, such as for computer 616 or mobile 618 uses. Each of these configurations includes devices that may have generally different constructs and capabilities, and thus the computing device 602 may be configured according to one or more of the different device classes. For instance, the computing device 602 may be implemented as the computer 616 class of a device that includes a personal computer, desktop computer, a multi-screen computer, laptop computer, netbook, and so on. The computing device 602 may also be implemented as the mobile 618 class of device that includes mobile devices, such as a mobile phone, portable music player, portable gaming device, a tablet computer, a wearable device, a multi-screen computer, and so on.

[0075] The techniques described herein may be supported by these various configurations of the computing device 602 and are not limited to the specific examples of the techniques described herein. This functionality may also be implemented all or in part through use of a distributed system, such as over a "cloud" 622 via a platform 624 as described below.

[0076] The cloud 622 includes and/or is representative of a platform 624 for resources 626. The platform 624 abstracts underlying functionality of hardware (e.g., servers) and software resources of the cloud 622. The resources 626 may include applications and/or data that can be utilized while computer processing is executed on servers that are remote from the computing device 602. Resources 626 can also include services provided over the Internet and/or through a subscriber network, such as a cellular or Wi-Fi network.

[0077] The platform 624 may abstract resources and functions to connect the computing device 602 with other computing devices. The platform 624 may also serve to abstract scaling of resources to provide a corresponding level of scale to encountered demand for the resources 626 that are implemented via the platform 624. Accordingly, in an interconnected device embodiment, implementation of functionality described herein may be distributed throughout the system 600. For example, the functionality may be implemented in part on the computing device 602 as well as via the platform 624 that abstracts the functionality of the cloud 622.

[0078] Although the subject matter has been described in language specific to structural features and/or methodological acts, it is to be understood that the subject matter defined in the appended claims is not necessarily limited to the specific features or acts described above. Rather, the specific features and acts described above are disclosed as example forms of implementing the claims.

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