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United States Patent Application 20180080476
Kind Code A1
McCune; Michael E. ;   et al. March 22, 2018

GEARED TURBOFAN FRONT CENTER BODY THERMAL MANAGEMENT

Abstract

An assembly for use in a gas turbine engine includes a center body support section including inner and outer annular walls, a plurality of struts, and a heat shield. The outer annular wall is disposed radially outward of the inner annular wall and a plurality of struts connect the inner and outer annular walls. The heat shield is disposed radially inward of and connected to the inner annular wall, such that a cavity is formed between the heat shield and the inner annular wall. The cavity is open to an air flow at a forward face of the center body support section. The inner annular wall and heat shield include first and second forward edges, respectively. The first and second forward edges are aligned axially.


Inventors: McCune; Michael E.; (Colchester, CT) ; Suciu; Gabriel L.; (Glastonbury, CT)
Applicant:
Name City State Country Type

United Technologies Corporation

Farmington

CT

US
Family ID: 1000002206424
Appl. No.: 15/269342
Filed: September 19, 2016


Current U.S. Class: 1/1
Current CPC Class: F04D 29/5853 20130101; F04D 29/063 20130101; F04D 29/522 20130101; F04D 29/542 20130101
International Class: F04D 29/58 20060101 F04D029/58; F04D 29/54 20060101 F04D029/54; F04D 29/52 20060101 F04D029/52; F04D 29/063 20060101 F04D029/063

Claims



1. An assembly for use with a gas turbine engine, the assembly comprising: a center body support section comprising: an inner annular wall having a first forward edge; an outer annular wall disposed radially outward of the inner annular wall; a plurality of struts connecting the inner and outer annular walls; and a heat shield having a second forward edge, the heat shield being disposed radially inward of and connected to the inner annular wall, such that a cavity is formed between the heat shield and the inner annular wall, wherein the cavity is open to an air flow at a forward face of the center body support section, and wherein the first forward edge of the inner annular wall and the second forward edge of the heat shield are aligned axially.

2. The assembly of claim 1, wherein the plurality of struts includes hollow struts open to the cavity formed between the inner annular wall and the heat shield.

3. The assembly of claim 2, wherein the hollow struts are open to an outer circumferential surface of the outer annular wall, and wherein a passageway extends through each of the hollow struts from the cavity to the outer circumferential surface.

4. The assembly of claim 3 and further comprising: a fan section, in which the center body support section is located; a first fan air flow path extending between the inner and outer annular walls of the center body support section; and a second fan air flow path extending from the forward front face through the cavity and through the passageways of the hollow struts of the center body support section

5. The assembly of claim 4 and further comprising: a bypass duct located radially outward of the center body, wherein the second fan air flow path extends out of the center body support section into the bypass duct.

6. The assembly of claim 4, wherein the heat shield and the center body support section have a frustoconical shape.

7. The assembly of claim 5, wherein a forward edge of the heat shield is disposed radially outward of an aft edge of the heat shield.

8. The assembly of claim 3, wherein the heat shield is disposed at a distance from the inner annular wall to allow passage of up to five percent by volume of a core air flow, the core air flow being equal to the sum of the air flow through the first and second fan air flow paths.

9. The assembly of claim 3, wherein the cavity between the inner annular wall and heat shield is closed at an aft face of the center body support section.

10. A method for reducing heat transfer from a bearing cavity to an inner annular wall of a center body support section of a gas turbine engine, the method comprising: shielding the inner annular wall from hot lubricant with a shield positioned between the inner annular wall and the bearing cavity; flowing a first portion of an air flow between the inner annular wall and an outer annular wall, the inner and outer annular walls separated by struts; and flowing a second portion of the air flow between the inner annular wall and the shield.

11. The method of claim 10 and further comprising: flowing the second portion of the air flow through internal passageways of at least a portion of the struts; and convectively cooling the shield with the second portion of the air flow.

12. The method claim of 11 and further comprising: discharging the second portion of the air flow from the struts to a bypass duct of the gas turbine engine.

13. The method of claim 12 and further comprising: discharging the second portion of the air flow into the bypass duct at a location aft of a fan exit guide vane.

14. The method of claim 13 and further comprising: generating the first and second portions of the air flow from a fan of the gas turbine engine.

15. The method of claim 14, wherein the second portion of the air flow is approximately five percent by volume of a total air flow, the total air flow being equal to the sum of the first portion and the second portion.

16. A gas turbine engine comprising: a center body support section comprising: an inner annular wall; an outer annular wall disposed outward from the inner annular wall; a heat shield disposed inward of and connected to the inner annular wall, such that a cavity is formed between the heat shield and the inner annular wall, and wherein the heat shield is circumferentially continuous; and a plurality of struts connecting the inner and outer annular walls, wherein the plurality of struts includes hollow struts open to the cavity at a first end and open to an outer surface of the outer annular section at a second end; and a gearbox cavity adjacent the heat shield, wherein the heat shield forms a radially outer wall of the gearbox cavity.

17. The gas turbine engine of claim 16, wherein the cavity formed between the heat shield and the inner annular wall has a circumferentially-extending opening at a first face and is closed at a second face of the center body support section, wherein the second face is located opposite the first face.

18. The gas turbine engine of claim 17, wherein the heat shield is disposed at a uniform radial distance from the inner annular wall.

19. The gas turbine engine of claim 18, wherein the heat shield has a frustoconical shape.

20. The gas turbine engine of claim 18, wherein the heat shield is disposed at a first distance from the inner annular wall and the inner annular wall is disposed at a second distance from the outer annular wall, the first distance being less than a quarter of the second distance.
Description



BACKGROUND

[0001] The present invention relates generally to gas turbine engines and, more particularly, to thermal management of a front center body support section.

[0002] Heat from hot oil in a fan bearing cavity can be transferred through an inner diameter wall of a gas turbine engine front center body to an air flow along the inner diameter wall entering a compressor section. The resultant increased temperature of the air flow can reduce efficiency of the compressor. Additionally, a difference in temperature between the air flow at the inner diameter wall and an air flow at an outer diameter wall can cause distortion to the compressor section structures.

SUMMARY

[0003] In one aspect, an assembly for use in a gas turbine engine includes a center body support section including inner and outer annular walls, a plurality of struts, and a heat shield. The outer annular wall is disposed radially outward of the inner annular wall and a plurality of struts connect the inner and outer annular walls. The heat shield is disposed radially inward of and connected to the inner annular wall, such that a cavity is formed between the heat shield and the inner annular wall. The cavity is open to an air flow at a forward face of the center body support section. The inner annular wall and heat shield include first and second forward edges, respectively. The first and second forward edges are aligned axially.

[0004] In another aspect, a method for reducing heat transfer from a bearing cavity to an inner annular wall of a center body support section of a gas turbine engine includes shielding the inner annular wall from hot lubricant with a shield positioned between the inner annular wall and the bearing cavity, flowing a first portion of an air flow between the inner annular wall and an outer annular wall, and flowing a second portion of the air flow between the inner annular wall and the shield. The inner and outer annular walls are separated by struts.

[0005] In yet another aspect, a gas turbine engine includes a center body support section and a gearbox cavity. The center body support section includes an inner annular wall, an outer annular wall disposed outward from the inner annular wall, a plurality of struts connecting the inner and outer annular walls, and a heat shield disposed inward of and connected to the inner annular wall, such that a cavity is formed between the heat shield and the inner annular wall. The heat shield is circumferentially continuous and forms a radially outer wall of the gearbox cavity, which is adjacent the heat shield.

[0006] The present summary is provided only by way of example, and not limitation. Other aspects of the present disclosure will be appreciated in view of the entirety of the present disclosure, including the entire text, claims and accompanying figures.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0007] FIG. 1 is a schematic quarter-sectional view of a gas turbine engine.

[0008] FIG. 2 is an exploded schematic cross-sectional view of a front center body support of the gas turbine engine of FIG. 1.

[0009] FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the front center body support.

[0010] FIG. 4 is a schematic cross-sectional view of the front center body support showing a fan air flowpath, taken along the line 4-4 of FIG. 3.

[0011] While the above-identified figures set forth embodiments of the present invention, other embodiments are also contemplated, as noted in the discussion. In all cases, this disclosure presents the invention by way of representation and not limitation. It should be understood that numerous other modifications and embodiments can be devised by those skilled in the art, which fall within the scope and spirit of the principles of the invention. The figures may not be drawn to scale, and applications and embodiments of the present invention may include features, steps and/or components not specifically shown in the drawings.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0012] FIG. 1 is a quarter-sectional view of a gas turbine engine 20 that includes fan section 22, compressor section 24, combustor section 26 and turbine section 28. Alternative engines might include an augmenter section (not shown) among other systems or features. Fan section 22 drives air along bypass flow path B while compressor section 24 draws air in along core flow path C where air is compressed and communicated to combustor section 26. In combustor section 26, air is mixed with fuel and ignited to generate a high pressure exhaust gas stream that expands through turbine section 28 where energy is extracted and utilized to drive fan section 22 and compressor section 24.

[0013] Although the disclosed non-limiting embodiment depicts a turbofan gas turbine engine, it should be understood that the concepts described herein are not limited to use with turbofans as the teachings may be applied to other types of turbine engines; for example a low-bypass turbine engine, or a turbine engine including a three-spool architecture in which three spools concentrically rotate about a common axis and where a low spool enables a low pressure turbine to drive a fan via a gearbox, an intermediate spool that enables an intermediate pressure turbine to drive a first compressor of the compressor section, and a high spool that enables a high pressure turbine to drive a high pressure compressor of the compressor section.

[0014] The example engine 20 generally includes low speed spool 30 and high speed spool 32 mounted for rotation about an engine central longitudinal axis A relative to an engine static structure 36 via several bearing systems 38. It should be understood that various bearing systems 38 at various locations may alternatively or additionally be provided.

[0015] Low speed spool 30 generally includes inner shaft 40 that connects fan 42 and low pressure (or first) compressor section 44 to low pressure (or first) turbine section 46. Inner shaft 40 drives fan 42 through a speed change device, such as gear system 48, to drive fan 42 at a lower speed than low speed spool 30. High-speed spool 32 includes outer shaft 50 that interconnects high pressure (or second) compressor section 52 and high pressure (or second) turbine section 54. Inner shaft 40 and outer shaft 50 are concentric and rotate via bearing systems 38 about engine central longitudinal axis A.

[0016] Combustor 26 is arranged between high pressure compressor 52 and high pressure turbine 54. In one example, high pressure turbine 54 includes at least two stages to provide a double stage high pressure turbine 54. In another example, high pressure turbine 54 includes only a single stage. As used herein, a "high pressure" compressor or turbine experiences a higher pressure than a corresponding "low pressure" compressor or turbine.

[0017] The example low pressure turbine 46 has a pressure ratio that is greater than about 5. The pressure ratio of the example low pressure turbine 46 is measured prior to an inlet of low pressure turbine 46 as related to the pressure measured at the outlet of low pressure turbine 46 prior to an exhaust nozzle.

[0018] Mid-turbine frame 58 of engine static structure 36 is arranged generally between high pressure turbine 54 and low pressure turbine 46. Mid-turbine frame 58 further supports bearing systems 38 in turbine section 28 as well as setting airflow entering low pressure turbine 46.

[0019] Front center body support 62 of engine static structure 36 is arranged generally between fan 42 and low pressure compressor section 44. Front center body support 62 further supports bearing systems 38 in fan section 22 as well as setting airflow entering low pressure compressor 44.

[0020] The core airflow C is compressed by low pressure compressor 44 then by high pressure compressor 52 mixed with fuel and ignited in combustor 26 to produce high speed exhaust gases that are then expanded through high pressure turbine 54 and low pressure turbine 46.

[0021] FIG. 2 is an exploded cross-sectional view of front center body support 62. Although the disclosed embodiments are described as relating to a front center body support of a gas turbine engine, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that the design disclosed for front center body support 62 can be implemented in other parts of the engine. FIG. 2 shows fan 42, bearings 38, bearing cavity 64, front center body support 62, and fan drive gear system (FDGS) 48. Bearings 38 support the rotation of shaft 66, which connects with FDGS 48 to drive fan 42. Cooling oil for bearings 38 and FDGS 48 is contained within bearing cavity 64, in part, by heat shield 68 of front center body support 62. Oil sprayed during operation, can contact heat shield 68 as indicated by arrow 70. During normal operations, the temperature of the oil can be over 200 degrees Fahrenheit (93 degree Celsius). Heat shield 68 can shield inner diameter wall 72 of front center body support 62 from contacting the hot oil and thereby, limit heat transferred to inner diameter wall 72 and through inner diameter wall 72 to core airflow C in flow path C.sub.1. In the absence of heat shield 68, heat from the oil can be transferred to core airflow C, causing distortion and reducing efficiency of low pressure compressor 44.

[0022] As shown in FIG. 2, a fan air flow is divided into three flow paths, indicated by arrows B, C.sub.1, and C.sub.2. Flow path B exits the fan through fan exit guide vane 74 to bypass duct 76. Core air flow C is divided into flow path C.sub.1 and C.sub.2. Flow path C.sub.1 extends through front center body support 62 and enters low pressure compressor 44. Flow path C.sub.2 enters a cavity formed between heat shield 68 and inner diameter wall 72. Air flow through flow path C.sub.2 exits front center body 62 through hollow struts (not labeled) and is discharged into bypass duct 76 aft of fan exit guide vane 74. A dynamic pressure P.sub.1 in the bypass duct can be lower than a dynamic pressure P.sub.2 at an inlet of front center body support 62, which can cause air flow to be driven through flow path C.sub.2 during operation. Air flow through flow path C.sub.2 can provide an insulating layer between heat shield 68 and inner diameter wall 72, thereby reducing heat transfer from oil in bearing cavity 64 to inner diameter wall 72. Additionally, because air is moving through flow path C.sub.2, heat transferred to the air flow in flow path C.sub.2 via convection can be removed from front center body support 62 with discharge of the heated air flow to bypass duct 76.

[0023] Generally, less than five percent of core air flow C (by volume) enters flow path C.sub.2. The remaining air flow can enter low pressure compressor 44 through flow path C.sub.1. Pressures P.sub.1 and P.sub.2 can vary. As long as P.sub.1 is less than P.sub.2, air flow can be driven through flow path C.sub.2 without additional assistance.

[0024] FIG. 3 is a perspective view of front center body support 62. Front center body support 62 includes inner diameter wall 72, outer diameter wall 78, struts 80, and heat shield 68. As shown in FIG. 3, inner and outer diameter walls 72 and 78 and heat shield 68 can be solid annular structures. Heat shield 68 can be integrally formed with or attached to inner diameter wall 72, providing a double wall at the inner diameter of front center body 62. Generally, front center body support 62, including inner and outer annular walls 72 and 78 and heat shield 68 can have a frustoconical shape with diameters of each annular structure 68, 72, and 78 decreasing from a forward end to an aft end of front center body 62, as can be seen in FIG. 1. As shown in FIG. 4, forward edge 82 of heat shield 68 can be disposed radially outward of aft edge 84 of heat shield 68, and inner and outer diameter walls 72 and 78 can have substantially the same frustoconical shape as heat shield 68. Returning to FIG. 3, outer diameter wall 78 is disposed radially outward of inner diameter wall 72 and is connected to inner diameter 72 by a plurality of struts 80. In some embodiments, eight or nine struts can be positioned in an equally spaced arrangement around an inner circumference of outer diameter wall 78 to provide structural stability to front center body support 62 and to direct air flow to low pressure compressor 44. As shown in FIG. 3, struts can have an aerodynamic structure, such as an airfoil shape, including leading edge 86 and trailing edge 88 (shown in FIG. 4).

[0025] All or a portion of struts 80 can be hollow, having passageway 90, forming a portion of flow path C.sub.2. As shown in FIG. 3, passageway 90 can open to an outer circumferential surface of outer diameter wall 78 at one end of strut 80 (e.g., an outer end). At an opposite, inner end of strut 80, passageway 90 can open to cavity 92 formed between heat shield 68 and inner diameter wall 72 (shown in FIG. 4).

[0026] FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional schematic view of front center body support 62, showing flow paths C.sub.1 and C.sub.2, taken along the line 4-4 of FIG. 3. As shown in FIG. 4, cavity 92 can be formed between heat shield 68 and inner diameter wall 72. The portion of fan air generally forming core air flow C can be divided between flow paths C.sub.1 and C.sub.2 at forward face 94 of front center body support 62. Cavity 92 can be open to core air flow C at forward face 94 along a full circumference of annular heat shield 68. Cavity 92 can be fully closed at aft face 96 of front center body 62, as shown in FIG. 4, forcing air to flow through passageway 90 of strut 80. In alternative embodiments, vanes can be used to secure heat shield 68 to inner diameter wall 72 and direct air flow into cavity 92.

[0027] As shown in FIG. 4, heat shield 68 can be disposed at a uniform radial distance (di) from inner diameter wall 72, such that a thickness of cavity 92 does not change in the axial or circumferential directions, thereby providing a substantially uniform insulating layer along inner diameter wall 72. Generally, the radial distance (d.sub.1) between heat shield 68 and inner diameter wall 72 can be large enough to accommodate an air flow volume of up to five percent of core air flow C, with the distance (d.sub.1) not exceeding a quarter of the radial distance d.sub.2 measured between inner diameter wall 72 and outer diameter wall 78. It will be understood by one of ordinary skill in the art to modify the radial distance between heat shield 68 and inner diameter wall 72 and air flow to flow path C.sub.2, as needed to reduce heat transfer to air flow in flow path C.sub.1 while improving overall engine efficiency.

[0028] As shown in FIG. 4, cavity 92 can extend from forward face 94 to a closure at aft face 96 to provide an insulating layer along a full length of front center body support 62. Passageway 90 can extend substantially a length (L) of strut 80 between leading edge 86 and trailing edge 88 to promote air flow to an aft end of the cavity (closure at aft face 96). In alternative embodiments, passageway 90 can extend a reduced length (L.sub.1) of strut 80, provided passageway 90 is positioned adjacent an aft end of cavity 92, such that the air flow extends the axial length of cavity 92. Passageway 90 can have a variety of shapes. In some embodiments, passageway 90 can have a shape similar to strut 80. In some embodiments, passageway 90 can additionally include air or oil tubes. In some embodiments, a metering section can be included as needed to maintain an adequate pressure differential (P.sub.2>P.sub.1) to drive air flow through flow path C.sub.2 to bypass duct 76. It will be understood by one of ordinary skill in the art to modify passageway 90 as necessary to provide structural stability and sufficient air flow. Because heat shield 68 is positioned radially inward of inner diameter wall 72, heat shield 68 blocks lubricating spray from entering passageway 90, while allowing air to flow through passageway 90.

[0029] Performance of the low pressure compressor 44 can be improved by reducing heat transferred to core air flow C entering low pressure compressor 44 from flow path C.sub.1. The addition of heat shield 68 and air flow path C.sub.2 can limit heat transfer to core air flow C in flow path C.sub.1 by providing an insulating layer between bearing cavity 64 and inner diameter wall 72 of front center body 62 and by discharging air heated by convection in flow path C.sub.2 to bypass duct 76.

[0030] Discussion of Possible Embodiments

[0031] The following are non-exclusive descriptions of possible embodiments of the present invention.

[0032] An assembly for use in a gas turbine engine includes a center body support section including inner and outer annular walls, a plurality of struts, and a heat shield. The outer annular wall is disposed radially outward of the inner annular wall and a plurality of struts connect the inner and outer annular walls. The heat shield is disposed radially inward of and connected to the inner annular wall, such that a cavity is formed between the heat shield and the inner annular wall. The cavity is open to an air flow at a forward face of the center body support section. The inner annular wall and heat shield include first and second forward edges, respectively. The first and second forward edges are aligned axially.

[0033] The assembly of the preceding paragraph can optionally include, additionally and/or alternatively, any one or more of the following features, configurations and/or additional components:

[0034] A further embodiment of the foregoing assembly, wherein the plurality of struts can include hollow struts open to the cavity formed between the inner annular wall and the heat shield.

[0035] A further embodiment of any of the foregoing assemblies, wherein the hollow struts can be open to an outer circumferential surface of the outer annular wall, and wherein a passageway can extend through each of the hollow struts from the cavity to the outer circumferential surface.

[0036] A further embodiment of any of the foregoing assemblies can further include a fan section, in which the center body support section is located. A first fan air flow path can extend between the inner and outer annular walls of the center body support section, and a second fan air flow path can extend from the forward front face through the cavity and through the passageways of the hollow struts of the center body support section.

[0037] A further embodiment of any of the foregoing assemblies can further include a bypass duct located radially outward of the center body. The second fan air flow path can extend out of the center body support section into the bypass duct.

[0038] A further embodiment of any of the foregoing assemblies, wherein the heat shield and the center body support section can have a frustoconical shape.

[0039] A further embodiment of any of the foregoing assemblies, wherein a forward edge of the heat shield can be disposed radially outward of an aft edge of the heat shield.

[0040] A further embodiment of any of the foregoing assemblies, wherein the heat shield can be disposed at a distance from the inner annular wall to allow passage of up to five percent by volume of a core air flow, the core air flow being equal to the sum of the air flow through the first and second fan air flow paths.

[0041] A further embodiment of any of the foregoing assemblies, wherein the cavity between the inner annular wall and heat shield can be closed at an aft face of the center body support section.

[0042] A method for reducing heat transfer from a bearing cavity to an inner annular wall of a center body support section of a gas turbine engine includes shielding the inner annular wall from hot lubricant with a shield positioned between the inner annular wall and the bearing cavity, flowing a first portion of an air flow between the inner annular wall and an outer annular wall, and flowing a second portion of the air flow between the inner annular wall and the shield. The inner and outer annular walls are separated by struts.

[0043] The method of the preceding paragraph can optionally include, additionally and/or alternatively, any one or more of the following steps, features, and/or configurations:

[0044] A further embodiment of the foregoing method can further include flowing the second portion of the air flow through internal passageways of at least a portion of the struts, and convectively cooling the shield with the second portion of the air flow.

[0045] A further embodiment of any of the foregoing methods can further include discharging the second portion of the air flow from the struts to a bypass duct of the gas turbine engine.

[0046] A further embodiment of any of the foregoing methods can further include discharging the second portion of the air flow into the bypass duct at a location aft of a fan exit guide vane.

[0047] A further embodiment of any of the foregoing methods can further include generating the first and second portions of the air flow from a fan of the gas turbine engine.

[0048] A further embodiment of any of the foregoing methods, wherein the second portion of the air flow can be approximately five percent of the total air flow, the total air flow being equal to the sum of the first portion and the second portion.

[0049] A gas turbine engine includes a center body support section and a gearbox cavity. The center body support section includes an inner annular wall, an outer annular wall disposed outward from the inner annular wall, a plurality of struts connecting the inner and outer annular walls, and a heat shield disposed inward of and connected to the inner annular wall, such that a cavity is formed between the heat shield and the inner annular wall. The heat shield is circumferentially continuous and forms a radially outer wall of the gearbox cavity, which is adjacent the heat shield.

[0050] The gas turbine engine of the preceding paragraph can optionally include, additionally and/or alternatively, any one or more of the following features, configurations and/or additional components:

[0051] A further embodiment of the foregoing gas turbine engine, wherein the cavity formed between the heat shield and the inner annular wall can have a circumferentially-extending opening at a first face and is closed at a second face of the center body support section. The second face is located opposite the first face.

[0052] A further embodiment of any of the foregoing gas turbine engines, wherein the heat shield can be disposed at a uniform radial distance from the inner annular wall.

[0053] A further embodiment of any of the foregoing gas turbine engines, wherein the heat shield can have a frustoconical shape.

[0054] A further embodiment of any of the foregoing gas turbine engines, wherein the heat shield can be disposed at a first distance from the inner annular wall and the inner annular wall can be disposed at a second distance from the outer annular wall, the first distance being less than a quarter of the second distance.

[0055] Summation

[0056] Any relative terms or terms of degree used herein, such as "substantially", "essentially", "generally", "approximately" and the like, should be interpreted in accordance with and subject to any applicable definitions or limits expressly stated herein. In all instances, any relative terms or terms of degree used herein should be interpreted to broadly encompass any relevant disclosed embodiments as well as such ranges or variations as would be understood by a person of ordinary skill in the art in view of the entirety of the present disclosure, such as to encompass ordinary manufacturing tolerance variations, incidental alignment variations, alignment or shape variations induced by thermal, rotational or vibrational operational conditions, and the like.

[0057] While the invention has been described with reference to an exemplary embodiment(s), it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various changes may be made and equivalents may be substituted for elements thereof without departing from the scope of the invention. In addition, many modifications may be made to adapt a particular situation or material to the teachings of the invention without departing from the essential scope thereof. Therefore, it is intended that the invention not be limited to the particular embodiment(s) disclosed, but that the invention will include all embodiments falling within the scope of the appended claims.

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