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United States Patent Application 20180117382
Kind Code A1
Johanson; Josh G. ;   et al. May 3, 2018

EXERCISE PURPOSE RACK WITH MOVABLE PURPOSE BAR

Abstract

Exemplary exercise racks can include a frame having a variety of support elements. The frame can support first and second movable vertical supports that are horizontally movable within the frame. A movable purpose bar can be attached to the first and second movable vertical supports such that the movable purpose bar can be moved vertically along the movable vertical supports. The movable purpose bar can therefore be moved vertically, along the movable vertical supports, and horizontally, as the movable vertical supports are moved horizontally within the frame. The purpose bar can include an attachment point for receiving one or more of a variety of attachments, which can be used for performing a variety of different exercises. Movement of the movable purpose bar and corresponding attachment point can configure the rack for a variety of uses with a variety of attachments.


Inventors: Johanson; Josh G.; (Elmore, MN) ; Johanson; Dustin N.; (Elmore, MN) ; Stauffer; Joseph F.; (Swea City, IA)
Applicant:
Name City State Country Type

Juggernaut Fitness, LLC

Elmore

MN

US
Family ID: 1000002997679
Appl. No.: 15/799472
Filed: October 31, 2017


Related U.S. Patent Documents

Application NumberFiling DatePatent Number
62415216Oct 31, 2016

Current U.S. Class: 1/1
Current CPC Class: A63B 21/00047 20130101; A63B 17/04 20130101; A63B 21/078 20130101; A63B 21/4033 20151001
International Class: A63B 21/00 20060101 A63B021/00; A63B 17/04 20060101 A63B017/04; A63B 21/078 20060101 A63B021/078

Claims



1. An exercise rack system comprising: a generally rectangular frame; a pair of movable vertical supports extending vertically within the generally rectangular frame and movable horizontally between a front of the generally rectangular frame and a back of the generally rectangular frame; and a movable purpose bar extending horizontally between the pair of movable vertical supports and vertically movable along the pair of movable vertical supports; wherein the movable purpose bar includes an attachment point for receiving one or more attachments attachable to the movable purpose bar.

2. An exercise rack system comprising: a frame comprising: a first vertical leg having a first end and a second end, the second end being opposite the first; a second vertical leg having a first end and a second end, the second end being opposite the first; a third vertical leg having a first end and a second end, the second end being opposite the first; a fourth vertical leg having a first end and a second end, the second end being opposite the first; a first upper guide bar extending generally horizontally in a first direction between the first end of the first vertical leg and the first end of the second vertical leg; a second upper guide bar extending generally horizontally in the first direction between the first end of the third vertical leg and the first end of the fourth vertical leg; a first lower guide bar extending generally horizontally in the first direction between the second end of the first vertical leg and the second end of the second vertical leg; a second lower guide bar extending generally horizontally in the first direction between the second end of the third vertical leg and the second end of the fourth vertical leg; a first movable vertical support extending between the first upper guide bar and the first lower guide bar, the first movable vertical support being horizontally movable in the first direction along the first upper guide bar and the first lower guide bar; a second movable vertical support extending between the second upper guide bar and the second lower guide bar, the first movable vertical support being horizontally movable in the first direction along the second upper guide bar and the second lower guide bar; and a movable purpose bar extending generally horizontally in a second direction between and movably attached to the first movable vertical support and the second movable vertical support such that the purpose bar is vertically movable along the first movable vertical support and the second movable vertical support.

3. The exercise rack system of claim 2, wherein the movable purpose bar comprises an attachment point for receiving one or more attachments attachable to the purpose bar by via the attachment point.

4. The exercise rack system of claim 3, wherein the one or more attachments is selected from the group consisting of: a dip attachment, a preacher curl attachment, an ab machine attachment, an inversion table attachment, a landmine attachment, a leg machine attachment, a cable machine attachment, a ladder pull-up attachment, and a boxing attachment.

5. The exercise rack system of claim 2, wherein the frame further comprises: a first upper support extending generally horizontally in the second direction between the first end of the first vertical leg and the first end of the third vertical leg; and a second upper support extending generally horizontally in the second direction between the first end of the second vertical leg and the first end of the fourth vertical leg.

6. The exercise rack system of claim 5, further comprising one or more additional attachment points disposed in the frame.

7. An exercise rack system comprising: a generally rectangular frame having: a first front vertical leg; a second front vertical leg; a first back vertical leg; a second back vertical leg; a first upper guide bar extending from an upper end of the first front vertical leg to an upper end of the first back vertical leg; a second upper guide bar extending from an upper end of the second front vertical leg to an upper end of the second back vertical leg; a first lower guide bar extending from a lower end of the first front vertical leg to a lower end of the first back vertical leg; a second lower guide bar extending from a lower end of the second front vertical leg to a lower end of the second back vertical leg; a first movable vertical support extending between the first upper guide bar and the first lower guide bar, the first movable vertical support being horizontally movable from a position proximate the first front vertical leg to the first back vertical leg; a second movable vertical support extending between the second upper guide bar and the second lower guide bar, the second movable vertical support being horizontally movable from a position proximate the second front vertical leg to the second back vertical leg; and a movable purpose bar extending generally horizontally between the first movable vertical support and the second movable vertical support, the movable purpose bar being vertically movable along the first movable vertical support and the second movable vertical support.

8. The exercise rack system of claim 6, wherein the movable purpose bar comprises an attachment point for receiving one or more attachments attachable to the purpose bar by via the attachment point, and wherein the attachment point is vertically movable by way of movement of the movable purpose bar along the first and second movable vertical supports and is horizontally movable by way of movement of the first and second movable vertical supports along the first and second upper and lower guide bars.
Description



CROSS-REFERENCES

[0001] This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/415,216, filed Oct. 31, 2016, the content of which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.

BACKGROUND

[0002] Pieces of exercise equipment, such as exercise racks, are generally static, limiting the functionality of the equipment to a small number of exercises. Thus, in order to perform a large variety of exercises, many individual pieces of equipment are often required. However, such arrangements can be costly and can take up excessive space.

SUMMARY

[0003] Aspects of the disclosure are generally directed toward exercise racks having a movable purpose bar. Exemplary racks can include a frame having a variety of support elements. The frame can support first and second movable vertical supports that are horizontally movable within the frame (e.g., movable front to back within a rectangular frame). A movable purpose bar can be attached to the first and second movable vertical supports such that the movable purpose bar can be moved vertically along the movable vertical supports. Thus, the movable purpose bar can be moved vertically, along the movable vertical supports, and horizontally, as the movable vertical supports are moved horizontally within the frame. The purpose bar can include an attachment point for receiving one or more of a variety of attachments, which can be used for performing a variety of different exercises. When the attachment(s) are attached to the movable purpose bar, the movement of the purpose bar can facilitate positioning of the attachments for convenient use by a user. This can be useful as a user changes exercises (e.g., from one attachment to another) and/or as different users (e.g., users having different heights) perform a single exercise. Such a versatile, multi-purpose exercise rack can replace several individual pieces of equipment, saving cost and space when compared to acquiring and storing each piece of equipment individually.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0004] FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an exemplary purpose rack capable of a variety of configurations and receiving a variety of attachments for facilitating a variety of different functions.

[0005] FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a frame 205 for a purpose rack.

[0006] FIGS. 3A-3C show different views of an exemplary movable vertical support.

[0007] FIGS. 4A-4C show different views of an exemplary purpose bar.

[0008] FIG. 5 shows a front-on view of an assembled purpose rack.

[0009] FIG. 6 is a top-down view of an assembled purpose rack.

[0010] FIG. 7 is a side view of an assembled purpose rack.

[0011] FIGS. 8A-8C show various views of an exemplary attachment portion for one or more accessories.

[0012] FIGS. 9A and 9B show front and side views, respectively, of an exemplary dip attachment for a purpose rack.

[0013] FIGS. 10A and 10B show front and side views, respectively, of an exemplary preacher curl attachment for a purpose rack.

[0014] FIGS. 11A and 11B show front and side views, respectively, of an exemplary ab machine attachment for a purpose rack.

[0015] FIGS. 12A and 12B show front and side views, respectively, of an exemplary inversion table attachment for a purpose rack.

[0016] FIGS. 13A and 13B show front and side views, respectively, of an exemplary landmine attachment for a purpose rack.

[0017] FIGS. 14A and 14B show front and side views, respectively, of an exemplary leg machine attachment for a purpose rack.

[0018] FIG. 15 shows a side view of an exemplary cable machine attachment for a purpose rack.

[0019] FIGS. 16A and 16B show front and side views, respectively, of an exemplary ladder pull-up attachment for a purpose rack.

[0020] FIGS. 17A and 17B show front and side views, respectively, of an exemplary boxing attachment for a purpose rack.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0021] FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an exemplary purpose rack capable of a variety of configurations and receiving a variety of attachments for facilitating a variety of different functions. In the illustrated example, purpose rack 100 includes a base comprising lower guide bars 102a and 102b and a connecting section 104 connecting the lower guide bars 102a and 102b. In the example of FIG. 1, the connecting section 104 comprises a C-shaped section connecting the lower guide bars 102a-b.

[0022] Purpose rack 100 of FIG. 1 includes vertical legs 110a, 110b, 110c, and 110d extending upward from the base. In the illustrated embodiment, vertical legs 110a-d and lower guide bars 102a-b are configured such that lower guide bar 102a extends between vertical legs 110a and 110b and lower guide bar 102b extends between vertical legs 110c and 110d. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, vertical legs 110a-d include holes, for example, for receiving one or more leg-connectable accessories, such as barbell supports, safety bars, or the like. In some examples, holes included in the vertical legs 110a-d are similar to those found in frames of common squat racks. In some embodiments, the spacing between holes in vertical legs 110a-d is uniform along a length of the vertical legs 110a-d. In other examples, one or more of vertical legs 110a-d include a first length having holes spaced apart by a first distance, and a second length having holes spaced apart by a second distance that is different from the first.

[0023] In the example of FIG. 1, vertical leg 110a includes a first length L1 having a plurality of holes spaced apart by a first distance and a second length L2 having a plurality of holes spaced apart by a second distance. Some such vertical legs (e.g., 110a-d) can include additional lengths separate from the first and second lengths. That is, a first length having holes spaced apart by a first distance and a second length having holes spaced apart by a second distance that is different from the first need not combine to extend the entire length of a leg.

[0024] The purpose rack 100 of FIG. 1 includes an upper support 114a extending between vertical legs 110a and 110d and upper support 114b extending between vertical legs 110b and 110c. The exemplary purpose rack 100 further includes upper guide bar 112a extending between vertical legs 110a and 110b and upper guide bar 112b extending between vertical legs 110d and 110c. In some embodiments, upper supports 114a-b and/or upper guide bars 112a-b provide structural integrity between vertical legs 110a-d.

[0025] In some embodiments, the combination of the base (e.g., the lower guide bars 102a-b and connecting section 104), the vertical legs 110a-d, the upper supports 114a-b, and the upper guide bars 112a-b make up a frame of the purpose rack 100. In some embodiments, the frame of the purpose rack 100 comprises components that are generally fixed relative to one another.

[0026] In the illustrated example of FIG. 1, upper supports 114a and 114b each include an attachment point 116a and 116b, respectively. Attachment points 116a-b can be used to receive one or more accessories, such as those described elsewhere herein, to facilitate multiple uses of the purpose rack 100. While shown as being positioned in both upper supports 114a-b, attachment point(s) can be positioned in a variety of locations, such as one on or both of upper supports 114a-b, vertical legs 110a-d, or any other appropriate location.

[0027] In the embodiment of FIG. 1, purpose rack 100 includes movable vertical support 122a extending between the lower guide bar 102a and the upper guide bar 112a and movable vertical support 122b extending between lower guide bar 102b and upper guide bar 112b. In various examples, the cross-sectional shape of movable vertical supports (e.g., 122a-b) can be any number of shapes. For examples, in various embodiments, the cross-sectional shape of one or more movable vertical supports can be a square, rectangle, rounded rectangle, oval, circle, or any other appropriate shape.

[0028] In some embodiments, movable vertical support 122a is configured to be movable along the upper 112a and lower 102a guide bars such that the movable vertical support 122a can be moved between vertical legs 110a and 110b. Similarly, in some embodiments, movable vertical support 122b is configured to be movable along the upper 112b and lower 102b guide bars such that the movable vertical support 122b can be moved between vertical legs 110c and 110d.

[0029] In the illustrated embodiment, movable vertical support 122a includes attachment portions 128a, 130a configured to interface with and secure movable vertical support 122a to lower guide bar 102a and upper guide bar 112a, respectively. Similarly, movable vertical support 122b includes attachment portions 128b, 130b configured to interface with and secure movable vertical support 122b to lower guide bar 102b and upper guide bar 112b, respectively.

[0030] In some embodiments, attachment portions 128a-b, 130a-b facilitate translation of the movable vertical supports 122a-b along the direction of guide bars 102a-b, 112a-b. For instance, in some examples, attachment portions (e.g., 128a) can include one or more rollers configured to roll along a surface of an associated guide bar (e.g., 102a). For example, with reference to FIG. 1, attachment potion 130a includes rollers 132a, 134a configured to roll along an upper surface of upper guide bar 112a. Similarly, attachment potion 130b includes rollers 132b, 134b configured to roll along an upper surface of upper guide bar 112b. In some embodiments, attachment portions 128a-b include similar rollers interfacing with an upper surface of lower guide bars 102a-b. While shown as interfacing with an upper surface of the upper guide bar, rollers can additionally or alternatively interface with other surfaces of such guide bars. Exemplary rollers can include, for example, polymer rollers to enable smooth and quiet motion of the movable vertical support (e.g., 122a). Other materials are also possible, such as metallic bearings or the like.

[0031] In some embodiments, one or more attachment portions (e.g., 128a-b, 130a-b) can be locked in place relative to the associated guide bar (e.g., 102a-b, 112a-b) via a locking mechanism. Exemplary locking mechanisms can include a pin, such as a lockout pop pin, that can prevent movement of the attachment portion relative to the associated guide bar when engaged, and allow movement of the attachment portion relative to the associated guide bar when disengaged. Additional or alternative locking mechanisms are possible, such as, for example, one or more magnetic elements, one or more indentations in which rollers (e.g., 132-b, 134a-b) settle to prohibit motion of the movable vertical supports relative to guide bars, one or more positionable surfaces (e.g., brakes) that can selectively apply friction to the rollers to inhibit rolling, one or more stops positionable to selectively prevent motion of the movable vertical supports relative to guide bars, or the like.

[0032] The purpose rack 100 further includes a purpose bar 120 supported by movable vertical supports 122a-b. In the embodiment of FIG. 1, the purpose bar 120 includes end portions 124a and 124b for interfacing with movable vertical supports 122a and 122b, respectively. In some examples, an end portion (e.g., 124a) is configured to surround an outer surface of a corresponding movable vertical support (e.g., 122a). In some such examples, each end portion 124a-b is shaped to match the cross-sectional shape of the corresponding movable vertical support 122a-b.

[0033] In some examples, the purpose bar 120 can be vertically movable relative to the movable vertical supports 122a-b. For instance, in some such examples, the end portions 124a-b of the purpose bar 120 are movable with respect to the movable vertical supports 122a-b. In some embodiments, the purpose bar 120 can be locked in place relative to the movable vertical supports 122a-b via one or more releasable attachment mechanisms (e.g., 126a-b). In the exemplary embodiment of FIG. 1, the one or more releasable attachment mechanisms comprise spring-loaded pins 126a-b configured to extend through a hole in a respective end portion 124a-b and enter one of a plurality of holes formed in a surface (e.g., the inner surface) of the respective movable vertical support 122a-b. For example, in the illustrated embodiment, spring-loaded pin 126a is configured to extend through a hole in end portion 124a and into one of a plurality of holes formed in the inner surface of the movable vertical support 122a, wherein the spring-loaded pin 126a is spring biased to be retracted into the hole in the movable vertical support 122a. Similarly, spring-loaded pin 126b is configured to extend through a hole in end portion 124b and into one of a plurality of holes formed in the inner surface of the movable vertical support 122b, wherein the spring-loaded pin 126b is spring biased to be retracted into the hole in the movable vertical support 122b.

[0034] Thus, in such embodiments, to reposition the purpose bar 120 relative to movable vertical supports 122a-b, the spring-loaded pins 126a-b can be pulled out of a hole in each of the movable vertical supports 122a-b. The purpose bar 120 can then be moved relative to the movable vertical supports 122a-b, and the spring-loaded pins 126a-b can be released, causing the spring-loaded pins 126a-b to retract into different holes in the movable vertical supports 122a-b. Thus, even if a user accidentally drops the purpose bar 120 while spring-loaded pins 126a-b are extracted from holes in the movable vertical supports 122a-b, the spring-loaded pins 126a-b will spring back into holes to prevent the purpose bar 120 from undesirably falling and potentially injuring the user.

[0035] While shown in the illustrate example as being positioned on inner surfaces, in various embodiments, holes in the movable vertical supports 122a-b can be positioned on any surface of the supports. Holes can be spaced apart by uniform or varying distances, for example, as discussed elsewhere herein with respect to lengths L.sub.1 and L.sub.2 of vertical supports. In some examples, holes can be positioned substantially along the length of the movable vertical supports 122a-b to increase the range of motion of the purpose bar.

[0036] Thus, in some embodiments, the purpose bar 120 is movable in at least two dimensions, for example, relative to the frame of the purpose rack 100. For instance, the movable nature of the attachment portions 128a-b, 130a-b relative to the lower 102a-b and upper 112a-b guide bars enables front-to-back (and back-to-front) motion of the purpose bar 120 by way of moving the movable vertical supports 122a-b relative to the lower 102a-b and upper 112a-b guide bars. Additionally, the movable nature of the purpose bar 120 relative to the movable vertical supports 122a-b enables up and down movement of the purpose bar 120 relative to the movable vertical supports 122a-b.

[0037] In some embodiments, the purpose bar 120 includes an attachment point 150. Attachment point 150 can be configured to interface with corresponding attachment points of one or more accessories for cooperative engagement of the accessory and the purpose bar. Such accessories can include one or more pieces of exercise equipment to facilitate different exercises by a user. The ability to position the purpose bar 120, and thus the attachment point 150 for attaching the accessory, facilitates an adjustable position for the accessory attached to the purpose bar 120. Adjusting the position of the accessory can be done to accommodate, for example, for the height of the user and/or the desired actions to be performed by the user using the accessory.

[0038] For instance, in an exemplary embodiment, an accessory comprises a pull-down accessory, wherein a user pulls down a grip element (e.g., a bar) against resistance. In using such an accessory, the accessory should be located above the user in order to facilitate the "pull down" motion. However, the desired starting location of the grip element may vary from user to user, for example, depending on the heights of the users. The desired starting location may also vary based on whether the user is seated or standing. Thus, the positioned of the accessory can be adjusted to accommodate the user's desired operation of the accessory by repositioning the purpose bar 120 within the frame of the purpose rack 100.

[0039] FIGS. 2-4 illustrate components that can be combined to form a purpose rack such as purpose rack 100 in FIG. 1.

[0040] FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a frame 205 for a purpose rack. In the illustrated example, frame 205 includes a base comprising lower guide bars 202a and 202b and a connecting section 204 connecting the lower guide bars 202a and 202b. In the example of FIG. 2, the connecting section 204 comprises a C-shaped section connecting the lower guide bars 202a-b.

[0041] Frame 205 of FIG. 2 includes vertical legs 210a, 210b, 210c, and 210d extending upward from the base. In the illustrated embodiment, vertical legs 210a-d and lower guide bars 202a-b are configured such that lower guide bar 202a extends between vertical legs 210a and 210b and lower guide bar 202b extends between vertical legs 210c and 210d. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 2, vertical legs 210a-d include holes, for example, for receiving one or more leg-connectable accessories, such as barbell supports, safety bars, or the like. In some examples, holes included in the vertical legs 210a-d are similar to those found in frames of common squat racks. In some embodiments, the spacing between holes in vertical legs 210a-d is uniform along a length of the vertical legs 210a-d. In other examples, one or more of vertical legs 210a-d include a first length having holes spaced apart by a first distance, and a second length having holes spaced apart by a second distance that is different from the first.

[0042] In the example of FIG. 2, vertical leg 210a includes a first length L1 having a plurality of holes spaced apart by a first distance and a second length L2 having a plurality of holes spaced apart by a second distance. Some such vertical legs (e.g., 210a-d) can include additional lengths separate from the first and second lengths. That is, a first length having holes spaced apart by a first distance and a second length having holes spaced apart by a second distance that is different from the first need not combine to extend the entire length of a leg.

[0043] The frame 205 of FIG. 2 includes an upper support 214a extending between vertical legs 210a and 210d and upper support 214b extending between vertical legs 210b and 210c. The exemplary frame 205 further includes upper guide bar 212a extending between vertical legs 210a and 210b and upper guide bar 212b extending between vertical legs 210d and 210c. In some embodiments, upper supports 214a-b and/or upper guide bars 212a-b provide structural integrity between vertical legs 210a-d.

[0044] In some embodiments, the combination of the base (e.g., the lower guide bars 202a-b and connecting section 204), the vertical legs 210a-d, the upper supports 214a-b, and the upper guide bars 212a-b make up a frame of the frame 205. In some embodiments, the frame of the frame 205 comprises components that are generally fixed relative to one another.

[0045] In the illustrated example of FIG. 2, upper supports 214a and 214b each include an attachment point 216a and 216b, respectively. Attachment points 216a-b can be used to receive one or more accessories, such as those described elsewhere herein, to facilitate multiple uses of the frame 205. While shown as being positioned in both upper supports 214a-b, attachment point(s) can be positioned in a variety of locations, such as one on or both of upper supports 214a-b, vertical legs 210a-d, or any other appropriate location.

[0046] FIGS. 3A-3C show different views of an exemplary movable vertical support. FIG. 3A shows a front-on view of an exemplary movable vertical support 322. In the illustrated examples, the movable vertical support 322 includes an elongate body 323 extending between an upper attachment portion 330 and a lower attachment portion 328. In some embodiments, the elongate body 323 includes a cross-sectional shape as described elsewhere herein.

[0047] The front-on view of the upper attachment portion 330 shows rollers 332 and 336 separated by a gap 335. Gap 335 can be configured to receive, for example, upper guide bar 212a or 212b of the frame 205 in FIG. 2 such that roller 332 engages a top surface of the upper guide bar 212a or 212b and roller 336 engages a lower surface of the upper guide bar 212a or 212b. Similarly, the front-on view of the lower attachment portion 328 shows rollers 340 and 344 separated by a gap 343. Gap 343 can be configured to receive, for example, lower guide bar 202a or 202b of the frame 205 in FIG. 2 such that roller 340 engages a top surface of the lower guide bar 202a or 202b and roller 344 engages a lower surface of the lower guide bar or 202b.

[0048] The perspective view in FIG. 3C shows roller 334 disposed behind roller 332, and thus obscured from view in the front-on view of FIG. 3A. Similarly, movable vertical support 322 can include a roller (not shown) disposed behind any one or more of rollers 336, 340, and 344. Thus, each attachment portion (328, 330) can include a plurality of rollers as described elsewhere herein to facilitate smooth motion of the attachment portions along guide bars.

[0049] As described elsewhere herein, and as shown in the side view of FIG. 3B, the elongate body 323 of the movable vertical support can include one or more holes, which can be configured to receive, for example, a pin for locking various components in place relative to the movable vertical support 322. While shown as disposed along the side of the elongate body 323, such holes can be positioned in any of a variety of locations along the elongate body 323 of the movable vertical support 322. Holes can be evenly spaced along the length of the elongate body, can have variable spacing, or can have separate lengths in having a different hole spacing associated with each length.

[0050] FIGS. 4A-4C show different views of an exemplary purpose bar. FIG. 4A is a front-on view of an exemplary purpose bar 420. The purpose bar 420 includes end portions 424a and 424b. The end portions 424a-b can be configured to interface with movable vertical support(s) such as movable vertical support 322 shown in FIGS. 3A-3C. The purpose bar 420 includes releasable attachment members, shown in FIGS. 4A-4C as spring-loaded pins 426a-b operably coupled to end portions 424a-b, respectively. As described elsewhere herein, spring-loaded pins 426a-b can be configured to be spring biased outward, toward end portions 424a-b. Thus, an inward force can be applied to spring-loaded pins 426a-b to retract pins 426a-b inward. Upon release of the force, the pins 426a-b can spring outward.

[0051] FIGS. 4B and 4C show a top-down view and a perspective view, respectively, of the purpose bar of FIG. 4A. The views of FIGS. 4B and 4C show the purpose bar having an attachment point 450, which can be configured to receive corresponding attachment points of one or more accessories as described elsewhere herein. As shown in the illustrated example of FIG. 4B, the end portions 424a-b include apertures 425a-b, respectively. In some examples, apertures 425a-b can be shaped to receive the elongate body (e.g., 323) of a corresponding movable vertical support (e.g., 322). For example, in some embodiments, an aperture (e.g., 425a) in an end portion (e.g., 424a) of a purpose bar (e.g., 420) can be shaped the same as or similarly to the cross-sectional shape of a corresponding elongate body (e.g., 323) of a movable vertical support (e.g., 322). In some embodiments, one or both of apertures 425a-b can include one or more rollers, such as those described elsewhere herein, configured to engage one or more surfaces of the movable vertical support extending through the aperture.

[0052] In some examples, the spring-loaded pins 426a-b extend into apertures 425a-b, respectively, for example, to engage one of a plurality of holes in the elongate body (e.g., 323) of a movable vertical support (e.g., 322). Thus, by disengaging spring-loaded pins 426a-b from the movable vertical supports (e.g., by applying sufficient inward force on pins 426a-b), the spring-loaded pins 426a-b disengage from the movable vertical supports, facilitating motion of the purpose bar 420 along the movable vertical supports. In some examples, in addition to or alternatively to engaging holes in the elongate body of a movable vertical support, spring loaded pins 426a-b may frictionally engage an outer surface of the elongate body of the movable vertical support(s) to prevent motion between the purpose bar 420 and the movable vertical support(s).

[0053] Thus, with reference to FIGS. 2, 3A-C, and 4A-C, in an exemplary construction of a purpose rack (e.g., purpose rack 100 in FIG. 1), a pair of movable vertical supports such as movable vertical support 322 of FIG. 3 can be inserted into the apertures 425a-b, respectively, in the purpose bar 420 of FIG. 4. The upper guide bars 212a-b of frame 205 of FIG. 2 can be inserted into gaps (e.g., 335) between rollers (e.g., 332 and 336) in an upper attachment portion (e.g., 330) in movable vertical supports (e.g. 322). Similarly, the lower guide bars 202a-b of frame 205 in FIG. 2 can be inserted into gaps (e.g., 343) between rollers (e.g., 340 and 344) in a lower attachment portion (e.g., 328) in movable vertical supports (e.g. 322). The resulting purpose rack includes a frame in which a purpose bar is movable in at least two dimensions (forward and backward due to the motion of the movable vertical supports relative to the frame and vertically due to motion of the purpose bar relative to the movable vertical supports).

[0054] FIG. 5 shows a front-on view of an assembled purpose rack. Similar to the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, the purpose rack 500 of FIG. 5 includes a vertical legs 510a and 510d comprising a plurality of holes therein to facilitate attachment of a variety of components. An upper support 514a includes an attachment point 516 further capable of facilitating attachment of components, such as accessories as described herein. A base includes a connecting section 504, for example, connecting lower guide bars (not shown) as described elsewhere herein. A purpose bar 520 is positioned within the purpose rack. Releasable attachment mechanisms (e.g., spring-loaded pins 526a-b) can facilitate vertical motion of the purpose bar 520 as indicated by arrows 560 and as described elsewhere herein.

[0055] FIG. 6 is a top-down view of an assembled purpose rack. Similar to the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, purpose rack 600 includes upper guide bars 612a-b and upper supports 614a-b. A base includes a connecting section 604, for example, connecting lower guide bars (not shown) as described elsewhere herein. As shown, the connecting section 604 includes an attachment point 607 that can receive, for example, a portion of an accessory for use with the purpose rack 600. The purpose rack 600 includes a purpose bar 620 which includes releasable attachment mechanisms (e.g., spring-loaded pins 626a-b), which can facilitate attachment of the purpose bar 620 to the purpose rack 600. As described elsewhere herein, the purpose rack 600 can include movable vertical supports (not shown) that interface with the releasable attachment mechanisms (e.g., spring-loaded pins 626a-b) to support the purpose bar 620.

[0056] In some embodiments, movable vertical supports include attachment portions 630a and 630b configured to interface with upper guide bars 612a and 612b, respectively, such as described elsewhere herein. In the illustrated example of FIG. 6, attachment portion 630a includes rollers 632a and 634a, and attachment portion 630b includes rollers 632b and 634b. Rollers 632a, 632b, 634a, and 634b can facilitate motion of the attachment portions 630a and 630b along upper guide bars 612a and 612b, respectively. As described elsewhere herein, any number of rollers can be used, including rollers hidden from the top-down view of FIG. 6.

[0057] In embodiments in which movable vertical supports (not shown) support the purpose bar 620 (e.g., via spring-loaded pins 626a-b), motion of attachment portions 630a and 630b of the movable vertical supports along upper guide bars 612a and 612b can facilitate motion of the purpose bar 620 in the directions of arrows 662. Purpose bar 620 includes an attachment point 650 for receiving one or more attachments as described elsewhere herein. Movement of the purpose bar 620 in the directions of arrows 662 corresponds to repositioning of the attachment point 650. This enables a user to move the attachment point to an appropriate location for use of the accessory attached to the purpose bar 620 as described elsewhere herein. In some examples, purpose bar 620 can be configured so attachment point 650 is movable along the length of the purpose bar 620, for example in the directions of arrows 664.

[0058] FIG. 7 is a side view of an assembled purpose rack. Similar to the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, purpose rack 700 includes lower guide bar 702b, upper guide bar 712b, vertical legs 710c and 710d, and a base includes a connecting section 704, for example, connecting lower guide bar 702 to another lower guide bar (not shown) as described elsewhere herein. The illustrated embodiment of FIG. 7 shows a movable vertical support 722b. The movable vertical support 722b includes a lower attachment portion 728b interfacing with the lower guide bar 702b. In some examples, lower attachment portion 728b interfaces with lower guide bar 702b to facilitate motion of the lower attachment portion 728b along the length of the lower guide bar 702b, for example, in the direction of arrows 762. Similarly, the movable vertical support 722b includes an upper attachment portion 730b interfacing with the upper guide bar 712b. In some examples, upper attachment portion 730b interfaces with upper guide bar 712b to facilitate motion of the upper attachment portion 730b along the length of the upper guide bar 712b, for example, in the direction of arrows 762.

[0059] As shown, the movable vertical support 722b interfaces with an end portion 724b, for example, of a purpose bar (not shown). As described elsewhere herein, the end portion 724b can be movable along the length of the movable vertical support 722b in the direction of arrows 760. Thus, a purpose bar (not shown) supported by movable vertical support 722b via end portion 724b can be moved in at least two dimensions, in the directions of arrows 760 and arrows 762.

[0060] Thus, as described with respect to FIGS. 5-7, in various embodiments, an attachment point on a purpose bar can be moved in up to three dimensions relative to the frame of the purpose rack. For example, the attachment point can be moved back and forth within the purpose rack (e.g., along directions of arrows 662 and 762 in FIGS. 6 and 7, respectively), up and down within the purpose rack (e.g., along directions of arrows 560 and 760 in FIGS. 5 and 7, respectively), and side to side, for example, along the length of the purpose bar (e.g., along directions of arrows 664 in FIG. 6). In various embodiments, movement may be possible in any one of such dimensions, any two of such dimensions, or all three dimensions.

[0061] The adjustable position of the attachment point relative, for example, to the frame of the purpose rack, can be useful for positioning the attachment point for use with a particular accessory. For example, during exemplary operation, a user may position attachment point to a first position and attach a first accessory to the attachment point, wherein the first accessory is configured for facilitating a first exercise. After the user has completed the first exercise, the user may remove the first attachment, reposition the attachment point to a second position, and attach a second accessory to the attachment point, wherein the second accessory is configured for facilitating a second exercise. In general, a user can adjust the position of the attachment point to optimize the position of an attachment for the size and/or functionality of the equipment and/or the size of the user. Additionally or alternatively, certain attachments may include a recommended purpose bar position with which to use the attachment. For instance, in some cases, the attachment may be used by users of all sizes without repositioning of the entire attachment. Rather, in some such examples, portions of the attachment itself can be adjusted to better fit the user. Thus, in some such examples, the purpose bar may be moved to a recommended position for use with the particular attachment.

[0062] In some examples, various accessories for attaching to the purpose rack (e.g., via the attachment point on the purpose bar) include an attachment portion that is configured to attach to an attachment point on the purpose bar. FIGS. 8A-8C show various views of an exemplary attachment portion for one or more accessories. FIG. 8A is a perspective view of an exemplary attachment portion, FIG. 8B is a front view of an exemplary attachment portion, and FIG. 8C is a side view of an exemplary attachment portion. As shown, attachment portion 870 of FIG. 8A includes a housing 872 having a front wall 874, a top wall 876, and a back wall 878, and a post 880 extending into a channel formed by the front wall 874, top wall 876, and back wall 878. In some embodiments, to the post 880 is configured to engage with the attachment point (e.g., 450) of the attachment bar, while the attachment bar itself extends through the channel formed by the front 874, top 876, and back 878 walls. In some embodiments, the channel is approximately the same height and/or approximately the same width as the purpose bar.

[0063] In some embodiments, the attachment portion 870 includes a locking mechanism for removably securing the attachment portion 870 to a purpose bar. For example, in the illustrated example, post 880 includes a hole 882, for example, for receiving a locking pin. The housing 872 can include one or more openings, such as openings 884 and 888 in the front 874 and back 878 walls, respectively, facilitating access to the hole 882 in the post 880. For instance, in an exemplary embodiment, to attach the attachment portion 870 to a purpose bar, a user inserts post 880 into an aperture located at the attachment point of the purpose bar. Once the post 880 is inserted fully into the purpose bar (e.g., and top wall 876 engages a top surface of the purpose bar), hole 882 may be exposed, for example, below the purpose bar or in a corresponding hole in the purpose bar. A locking pin or other object can be inserted into the hole 882 in the post 880 to lock the attachment portion 870 to the purpose bar.

[0064] In some examples, the housing 872 of the attachment portion 870 can facilitate the attaching of the attachment portion 870 to various attachments for use with the system, such as via screws or other fasteners. However, it will be appreciated that in some examples, attachment mechanisms need not include each or any of the housing surfaces (e.g., 874, 876, 878). For example, in some embodiments, an attachment portion can include a post such as 880 attached directly to an accessory, for example, via a welded joint.

[0065] Attachment portions (e.g., 870) can be included on one or more accessories to facilitate attachment of the accessory to the purpose rack. In some examples, such attachment portions can be used to attach to an attachment point on a purpose bar. Additionally or alternatively, attachment portions can be used to attach to one or more other attachment points in the purpose rack, such as holes in the vertical legs (e.g., 110a-d), attachment points (e.g., 116a-b) in upper supports (e.g., 114a-b), attachment point 607 in the base (e.g., connecting section 604) or other attachment location in the purpose rack.

[0066] In some embodiments, one or more attachment points (e.g., holes in vertical legs 110a-d, attachment point 607 in base, etc.) can be used to secure a purpose bench within or otherwise proximate the purpose rack. The purpose bench can be used in conjunction with different attachments to facilitate various exercises using such attachments. In some examples, the purpose bench is attached in a prescribed way to the purpose rack and operates in conjunction with an attachment attached to the purpose bar. In some such examples, the purpose bar can be moved to a recommended location for use with both the particular attachment and the purpose bench. Additionally or alternatively, a purpose bench need not physically attach to the purpose rack to be used in conjunction with such attachments.

[0067] FIGS. 9-17 illustrate a variety of possible attachments for use with a purpose rack such as those described herein.

[0068] FIGS. 9A and 9B show front and side views, respectively, of an exemplary dip attachment for a purpose rack. In an exemplary embodiment, dip attachment 990 includes an attachment portion 970 such as those described elsewhere herein (e.g., with respect to FIGS. 8A-C) for attaching to an attachment point of the purpose rack, for example, attachment point 150 on purpose bar 120. During exemplary operation, a user can adjust the location of the purpose bar (e.g., height and depth within the purpose rack) to optimize the position of the dip attachment 990 for the user to perform dips, for example, using handles 992a-b.

[0069] FIGS. 10A and 10B show front and side views, respectively, of an exemplary preacher curl attachment for a purpose rack. In an exemplary embodiment, preacher curl attachment 1090 includes an attachment portion 1070 such as those described elsewhere herein (e.g., with respect to FIGS. 8A-C) for attaching to an attachment point of the purpose rack, for example, attachment point 150 on purpose bar 120. During exemplary operation, a user can adjust the location of the purpose bar (e.g., height and depth within the purpose rack) to optimize the position of the preacher curl attachment 1090 for the user to perform curls. For instance, the position of the preacher curl attachment 1090 can be adjusted depending on the height of the user and/or whether or not the user desires to perform the exercise standing or seated (e.g., using a purpose bench).

[0070] FIGS. 11A and 11B show front and side views, respectively, of an exemplary ab machine attachment for a purpose rack. In an exemplary embodiment, ab machine attachment 1190 includes an attachment portion 1170 such as those described elsewhere herein (e.g., with respect to FIGS. 8A-C) for attaching to an attachment point of the purpose rack, for example, attachment point 150 on purpose bar 120. During exemplary operation, a user can adjust the location of the purpose bar (e.g., height and depth within the purpose rack) to optimize the position of the ab machine attachment 1190 for the user to perform one or more abdominal exercise. Position can be optimized, for example, based on the user's height and/or the desired exercise(s) to be performed.

[0071] FIGS. 12A and 12B show front and side views, respectively, of an exemplary inversion table attachment for a purpose rack. In an exemplary embodiment, inversion table attachment 1290 includes an attachment portion 1270 such as those described elsewhere herein (e.g., with respect to FIGS. 8A-C) for attaching to an attachment point of the purpose rack, for example, attachment point 150 on purpose bar 120. During exemplary operation, a user can adjust the location of the purpose bar (e.g., height and depth within the purpose rack) to optimize the position of the inversion table attachment 1290 to best fit the user while allowing the inversion table attachment to travel through its full range of motion. For example, in some embodiments, the length of the inversion table can be adjusted (e.g., via pin 1292 and holes 1294) and/or the height of the purpose bar can be adjusted so that a user may comfortably use the inversion table attachment 1290, and so that the inversion table attachment 1290 can move through its entire range of motion. In some examples, an inversion table attachment 1290 can be associated with a recommended purpose bar position to ensure full range of motion of the attachment 1290, and the attachment 1290 itself can be adjusted to accommodate different users (e.g., via 1292, 1294).

[0072] FIGS. 13A and 13B show front and side views, respectively, of an exemplary landmine attachment for a purpose rack. In an exemplary embodiment, landmine attachment 1390 includes an attachment portion 1370 such as those described elsewhere herein (e.g., with respect to FIGS. 8A-C) for attaching to an attachment point of the purpose rack, for example, attachment point 150 on purpose bar 120. During exemplary operation, a user can adjust the location of the purpose bar (e.g., height and depth within the purpose rack) to optimize the position of the landmine attachment 1390 to best fit the user. In other examples, the attachment portion 1370 of the landmine attachment can be attached to alternative points on the purpose rack, such as on the base (e.g., attachment point 607 in FIG. 6). In some examples, the attachment portion 1370 can secure a fixed portion 1392 of the landmine attachment 1390 to the purpose rack (e.g., the base, the purpose bar, etc.) while a movable portion 1394 moves relative to the purpose rack as the user performs one or more exercises using the landmine attachment 1390.

[0073] FIGS. 14A and 14B show front and side views, respectively, of an exemplary leg machine attachment for a purpose rack. In an exemplary embodiment, leg machine attachment 1490 includes an attachment portion 1470 such as those described elsewhere herein (e.g., with respect to FIGS. 8A-C) for attaching to an attachment point of the purpose rack, for example, attachment point 150 on purpose bar 120. During exemplary operation, a user can adjust the location of the purpose bar (e.g., height and depth within the purpose rack) to optimize the position of the leg machine attachment 1490 to best fit the user and/or the desired exercise to be performed (e.g., leg curls, leg extensions, etc.). In some examples, the purpose bar can be moved to a recommended location for use with the leg machine attachment 1490 and a purpose bench in combination. In some such examples, different portions of the leg machine attachment (e.g., 1492, 1494) can be adjusted to accommodate different users.

[0074] FIG. 15 shows a side view of an exemplary cable machine attachment for a purpose rack. In an exemplary embodiment, cable machine attachment 1590 includes one or more attachment portions 1570a, 1570b such as those described elsewhere herein (e.g., with respect to FIGS. 8A-C) for attaching to an attachment point of the purpose rack. In some examples, attachment portions 1570a, 1570b are configured to attach to parts of the frame of the purpose rack. For example, attachment portion 1570a can be configured to attach to an attachment point on the base of the purpose rack, such as 607 in FIG. 6, while attachment portion 1570b can be configured to attach to an attachment point on an upper portion of the frame, such as attachment point 116a or 116b, or holes in vertical legs 110a-d shown in FIG. 1. In some embodiments, attachment portion 1570b is positioned on a movable portion 1592 of the cable machine attachment to facilitate engagement and disengagement of the attachment portion 1570b with the purpose rack. In other examples, attachment portion 1570a can be configured to attach to the attachment point of the purpose bar (e.g., attachment point 150 of purpose bar 120 in FIG. 1), and in some such examples, the purpose bar is positioned in a recommended location for use with the cable machine attachment 1590.

[0075] In some examples, the cable machine attachment 1590 can be fixed to various attachment points of a purpose rack. In some examples, the cable machine attachment 1590 is positioned to operate in conjunction with a purpose bench as described elsewhere herein. The cable machine attachment 1590 can include a movable element 1594 to facilitate various operations of attachment 1590. For example, adjusting the position of the movable element 1594 can adjust slack in the cable 1596 to adjust the neutral positions of connection points 1598a and 1598b for connecting to one or more additional accessories for performing one or more exercises using the cable machine attachment 1590.

[0076] FIGS. 16A and 16B show front and side views, respectively, of an exemplary ladder pull-up attachment for a purpose rack. In an exemplary embodiment, ladder pull-up attachment 1690 includes one or more attachment portions 1670a and 1670b such as those described elsewhere herein (e.g., with respect to FIGS. 8A-C) for attaching to an attachment point of the purpose rack. In some examples, attachment portions 1670a, 1670b are configured to attach to parts of the frame of the purpose rack. For example attachment portions 1670a and/or 1670b can be configured to attach to an attachment point on an upper portion of the frame, such as attachment point 116a or 116b, or holes in vertical legs 110a-d shown in FIG. 1. In an exemplary embodiment, attachment portions 1670a and 1670b are inserted into different holes in vertical legs (e.g., 110a-d). Additionally, while the side view of FIG. 16B shows two attachment portions 1670a and 1670b, additional attachment portions may be included, for example behind attachment portions 1670a-b from the perspective of FIG. 16B. For example, attachment portions 1670a-b may be inserted into holes in vertical leg 110c in FIG. 1, while additional attachment portions (e.g., spaced apart similarly to attachment portions 1670a-b) can be inserted into holes in vertical leg 110b in FIG. 1. Thus, in some examples, the ladder pull-up attachment 1690 can be supported by multiple vertical legs of the purpose rack frame.

[0077] FIGS. 17A and 17B show front and side views, respectively, of an exemplary boxing attachment for a purpose rack. In an exemplary embodiment, boxing attachment 1790 includes one or more attachment portions 1770a and 1770b such as those described elsewhere herein (e.g., with respect to FIGS. 8A-C) for attaching to an attachment point of the purpose rack. In some examples, attachment portions 1770a, 1770b are configured to attach to parts of the frame of the purpose rack. For example attachment portions 1770a and/or 1770b can be configured to attach to an attachment point on an upper portion of the frame, such as attachment point 116a or 116b, or holes in vertical legs 110a-d shown in FIG. 1. In an exemplary embodiment, attachment portions 1770a and 1770b are inserted into different holes in vertical legs (e.g., 110a-d). Additionally, while the side view of FIG. 17B shows two attachment portions 1770a and 1770b, additional attachment portions may be included, for example behind attachment portions 1770a-b from the perspective of FIG. 17B. For example, attachment portions 1770a-b may be inserted into holes in vertical leg 110c in FIG. 1, while additional attachment portions (e.g., spaced apart similarly to attachment portions 1770a-b) can be inserted into holes in vertical leg 110b in FIG. 1. Thus, in some examples, the boxing attachment 1790 can be supported by multiple vertical legs of the purpose rack frame. Boxing attachment 1790 can include a connection point 1792 for receiving one or more boxing accessory. For example, connection point 1792 can receiving corresponding connection points 1798 included on a speed bag attachment 1794 or a heavy bag attachment 1796 as shown in FIG. 17B.

[0078] While FIGS. 9-17 show a variety of possible attachments, it will be appreciated that additional attachments for facilitating any number of exercises using the purpose rack. Figures used and described herein are not necessarily drawn to scale unless otherwise noted. Additionally, the figures and descriptions herein are exemplary in nature and do not limit the scope of the invention in any way. Rather, such examples are provided to demonstrate various possible configurations and implementations within the scope of the following claim(s).

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