Easy To Use Patents Search & Patent Lawyer Directory

At Patents you can conduct a Patent Search, File a Patent Application, find a Patent Attorney, or search available technology through our Patent Exchange. Patents are available using simple keyword or date criteria. If you are looking to hire a patent attorney, you've come to the right place. Protect your idea and hire a patent lawyer.


Search All Patents:



  This Patent May Be For Sale or Lease. Contact Us

  Is This Your Patent? Claim This Patent Now.



Register or Login To Download This Patent As A PDF




United States Patent 3,908,645
Sandvig September 30, 1975

Ophthalmic pressure bandage

Abstract

An ophthalmic therapeutic pressure bandage comprising a conformable, permeable carrier tape including a hypoallergenic pressure-sensitive adhesive, and incorporating as a part thereof a resilient, absorbent foam pad of sufficient thickness to apply light-therapeutic pressure to the eye to prevent nictation. The resilient pad having an interlayer of absorbent non-woven web material attached to the foam layer, and a non-adherent facing bonded to said web material to prevent sticking of the pad to the tissues when the bandage is in use.


Inventors: Sandvig; Timothy C. (Woodville, WI)
Assignee: Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company (St. Paul, MN)
Appl. No.: 05/473,397
Filed: May 28, 1974


Current U.S. Class: 602/74
Current International Class: A61F 13/02 (20060101); A61F 13/12 (20060101); A61F 13/00 (20060101); A61F 005/24 ()
Field of Search: 128/97,163,156,132 2/15

References Cited

U.S. Patent Documents
2543104 February 1951 Golding
2572638 October 1951 Loos
3039459 June 1962 Scholl
3092103 June 1963 Mower
3156242 November 1964 Crowe, Jr.
3339206 September 1967 Daley
3441021 April 1969 Endres
3536072 October 1970 Quello
3709221 January 1973 Riely
Primary Examiner: Gaudet; Richard A.
Assistant Examiner: Yasko; J.
Attorney, Agent or Firm: Alexander, Sell, Steldt & DeLaHunt

Claims



1. An ophthalmic therapeutic pressure bandage comprising:

a. a conformable, permeable carrier tape comprising a backing and a layer of hypoallergenic pressure-sensitive adhesive on one surface thereof;

b. a multi-layer pad attached to said carrier tape on the surface carrying the pressure-sensitive adhesive, said pad comprising:

i. an absorbent resilient foam material adjacent to the tape and attached thereto by the pressure-sensitive adhesive;

ii. an interlayer of absorbent non-woven web material attached to said foam material; and

iii. a porous, non-adherent facing attached to said web material;

the multi-layer pad being of a shape and size to anatomically conform to the cavity of the external eye and having thickness so as to allow

2. The bandage in accordance with claim 1 wherein the tape backing

3. The bandage in accordance with claim 2 wherein the elastomeric foam

4. The bandage in accordance with claim 1 wherein the backing comprises a

5. The bandage in accordance with claim 1 wherein the tape backing

6. The bandage in accordance with claim 5 wherein the backing comprises a

7. The bandage in accordance with claim 1 wherein the absorbent resilient

8. The bandage in accordance with claim 7 wherein said foam material

9. The bandage in accordance with claim 1 wherein the non-woven web material is attached to the absorbent resilient foam material by

10. The bandage in accordance with claim 1 wherein said non-adherent facing

11. The bandage in accordance with claim 1 wherein the carrier tape islands the multi-layer pad leaving a sufficient pressure-sensitive adhesive area exposed surrounding the pad so as to operculate the eye socket when the

12. The bandage in accordance with claim 11 wherein the exposed pressure-sensitive adhesive area of the carrier tape is covered with a release liner, said release liner extending beyond the outer edge of the carrier tape and has therein an aperture, said aperture being slightly

13. The bandage in accordance with claim 1 wherein the backing comprises a bonded non-woven web of polyester fibers, the absorbent resilient foam material of said pad comprises open-cell foam and the non-woven web material is attached to the resilient open-cell foam material by needled-in fibers of the non-woven web material.
Description



This invention relates to dressings and bandage constructions, and, particularly, to an ophthalmic therapeutic pressure bandage.

Many different kinds of eye bandage constructions and bandaging procedures are commonly known. One of the problems with most known eye bandaging procedures, however, is that they require a medical professional to construct them on the patient, for example, U.S. Pat. No. 3,300,786.

In many instances involving the need for an eye bandage, it is preferable to apply light pressure to the eye. Not only is there a therapeutic need for an absorbent bandage when injury is present, but there is an even greater therapeutic value to the continual application of gentle pressure to prevent undesirable nictation. Application of such gentle pressure serves as a combined psychological/physiological crutch which allows the bandaged eye to rest immobilized. In the absence of such pressure, it is difficult for the bandaged eye lid to resist coordinate movement with the unbandaged eye.

Ophthalmic bandages known to the art have naturally included absorbent pads, but these have usually consisted of pads of folded gauze or cellulosic material. Not only were the gauze pads of cumbersome dimension so that they applied uneven pressure, but by nature, they tended to adhere to the eye so that removal was difficult and traumatic. On the other hand, other prior art bandages applied no pressure to the eye, U.S. Pat. No. 3,092,103.

The external backing of known prior art eye bandages are poorly designed from both aesthetic and practical viewpoints. Traditionally, this has consisted of a patch of gauze or cloth surmounted by crossed strips of adhesive tape. This non-opercular construction was not only uncomfortable, but often loosened or became unadhered in places. Also, it presented psychological trauma because of its conspicuousness. Children who had a need to wear such a path for extended periods to strengthen the unbandaged eye would frequently remove the patch to forestall gibes from their peers. Such interruption of the usage delayed therapy.

An eye bandage has been found which does not have the aforementioned drawbacks. It is an ophthalmic therapeutic pressure bandage comprising: (a) a conformable permeable carrier tape comprising a backing and a layer of hypoallergenic pressure-sensitive adhesive on one surface thereof; (b) a multi-layer pad attached to said surface of the tape carrying said pressure-sensitive adhesive, said pad comprising: an absorbent resilient foam material adjacent to said tape; an interlayer of an absorbent non-woven web material attached to said foam material; and a porous, non-adherent facing attached to the web material, the multi-layer pad being of a shape, size and thickness so as to allow sufficient pressure to be applied to an eye to prevent nictation.

The light therapeutic pressure feature which prevents nictation is provided by a multi-layer pad. The thwarting of nictation is desirable when treating an occular malady such as a corneal abrasion, an allergy or a microbial infection and is particularly useful for post-operative therapy. It can prevent hemorrhages by constricting capillaries. Another feature is that the pad protects the treated area from injury caused by impact.

The present bandage is also useful as an aid in strengthening the use of one eye as in amblyopia therapy. The present bandage is also useful to protect the eye from ultraviolet exposure, for example, when infants are being treated for the condition of hyperbilirubinemia.

The structural advantages of the ophthalmic bandage can best be described by reference to the drawings:

FIG. 1 which illustrates a bandage in use on a patient;

FIG. 2 which shows a view of the bandage as seen from below;

FIG. 3 which shows a sectional view along the line 3--3 of FIG. 2; and

FIG. 4 which shows a sectional view illustrating the preferred means of attaching the absorbent non-woven web material to the foam pad by needled-in fibers.

FIG. 1 illustrates the preferred embodiment of the present invention in use. An ophthalmic opercular therapeutic pressure bandage 10 is shown completely enclosing the eye, thus excluding dust, dirt and microbial invaders.

Referring to FIG. 3, an unused bandage 30 comprises a permeable, conformable carrier tape 11 having an elastomeric backing 12 and a layer of hypoallergenic pressure-sensitive adhesive 13. As noted, the backing of the tape is elastomeric, which allows the application of controlled pressure by stretching upon application. However, non-elastomeric backing may be used. One preferred backing is made of split foam, which is normally from 0.075 to 0.2 mm thick.

Chemically blown foam is produced between two restraining sheets or liners. Foam produced in such a manner, which is known to the art, has an integral skin on both surfaces which have been in contact with the liners. The foam is then split or slit through its center producing two essentially identical thinner sheets of foam, each having one skin surface and one slit surface. The slit surfaces are characterized by a very open surface having essentially no transverse cell walls and hence, very low reflectance. Breathability or porosity is governed almost entirely by the skin surface. Pressure-sensitive adhesive may then be applied to the skin surface.

The preferred method of producing a split foam carrier tape involves forming the foam between two liners which first have been coated with a low adhesion backsize or release coating and then with a hypoallergenic pressure-sensitive adhesive. When the foam is formed between these adhesive-coated liners, the adhesive is automatically adhered to the foam. This provides better bonding to the foam and has some effect upon control of the desired permeability of the foam skin.

The preferred split foam backing consists of a plasticized polyvinyl chloride foam. The plasticizer is of the so-called permanent, non-migrating, non-sensitizing type. The split foam carrier tape is then elastic, pliable, conformable and yielding. This is due to the skin of the foam which can be much thinner than the usual plastic backing and, hence, more pliable, more conformable, and more elastic, while at the same time, not having sufficient elastic strength to constrict blood circulation under the split-foam carrier tape because of its extreme thinness.

The exposed split surface of the foam is such as to have a minimum of actual solid surface thereby providing for minimum reflectance and minimum capacity for soiling and staining, thereby, providing a surface of low visibility. It is, of course, obvious that said foam may be colored to match various skin tones and hues as to further reduce its contrast with the skin.

Another preferred backing 12 which is elastomeric is prepared from polyester fibers approximately 40 mm long and 1.5 deniers which are made into a web on a Garnett Carding Machine, model 74C-120, Procter and Schwartz, Inc., Philadelphia, Pa., or a Rando-Webber Machine, Curlator, Inc., East Rochester, N.Y., or the like. See Copeland, U.S. Pat. No. 3,121,021 for a detailed description of this tape. The web is bonded with Elvace latex, an ethylene/acetate copolymer from E. I. duPont deNemours and Co., Wilmington, Del. It is coated with one of any of the adhesives described below.

Hypoallergenic adhesives are commonly known, such as the polyurethanes described in Trancik, U.S. Pat. No. 3,769,071. Other suitable adhesives are copolymers of a major amount of an acrylate ester and a minor amount of acrylic acid. Suitable acrylate esters include isoamyl acrylate, the acrylate ester of commercial fusel oil, 2-ethylbutyl acrylate, ethyl acrylate, isooctyl acrylate and the like as set forth in U.S. Pat. No. Re. 24,906 (Ulrich), issued Dec., 1960, cf. Stow, U.S. Pat. No. 2,925,174, issued Feb., 1960. As also taught in that patent, acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, itaconic acid, acrylamide and methacrylamide can be used as comonomers with the acrylate ester. The ratio of acrylic ester to acrylic acid, or its equivalent, can be in the range of 92-96:8-4.

As illustrated in FIG. 3, a multi-layer pad 15 comprises an absorbent resilient foam material 16, attached to the carrier tape by pressure-sensitive adhesive 13, an interlayer of highly absorbent non-woven web material 17 sandwiched between a porous non-adherent facing 18 and the resilient foam 16. The non-woven web material is attached to the foam 16 by gluing, heat bonding or the like. The facing 18 is thermally attached to the non-woven web material 17 by the method disclosed in Eldredge, U.S. Pat. No. 3,285,245.

The absorbent resilient foam 16 can be any absorbent resilient lint-free foam such as polyurethane, polyether, polyester, polyolefin, etc., which are commonly known. Preferably, the foam is an open-cell foam. As noted, the foam must have a thickness and compressive strength so as to provide enough pressure to prevent nictation. Some control of the pressure on the eye can be had by using an elastomeric carrier tape.

The multi-layer pad 15 including the foam 16 is anatomically shaped to conform to the cavity of the external eye. As illustrated in FIG. 2, the pad 15 is of unsymetrical oval shape, normally 50-75 mm in length and 15-50 mm in width. The foam 16 portion is generally from 10-20 mm thick. Pads of various sizes and shapes can be provided to accommodate infants, children and adults. All layers of pad 15 are lint free.

The absorbent non-woven web material 17 is made of fibers disclosed in Eldredge, U.S. Pat. No. 3,285,245, such as absorbent cellulose acetate, or rayon fibers. The web is made by known methods. This layer is normally about 2 to 3 mm thick.

The porous non-adherent facing 18 is a release layer made of a thermoplastic film made of organic polymer, such as polypropylene, nylon, or polyethylene. It is inert and non-absorbent to eye exudates. It is preferred to use a facing as described in Eldredge, U.S. Pat. No. 3,285,245. Heat-sealing techniques of such films to the non-woven web material 17 are also described in the Eldredge patent.

Referring to FIG. 2, the pressure-sensitive adhesive 13 is covered with a release liner 20 used to protect the exposed adhesive until the bandage is used. The liner 20 extends beyond the outer edge of the carrier tape to facilitate removal when ready for use. An oversized pad-shaped aperture 21 is precut into the release liner to facilitate removal from the tape. Any common release liner may be used.

A preferred embodiment of the ophthalmic bandage 40 is illustrated in FIG. 4. The absorbent web material is attached to the absorbent resilient foam 26 by needling web fibers 29 into the foam with a needle loom. These needle-like fibers 29 serve as minute wicks which absorb and wick moisture and exudate away from the eye into the absorbent foam. The absorbent foam 26 comprises a thicker layer than the highly absorbent web interlayer 27 and serves as a sponge to help keep the treated area relatively free of excess moisture and exudate, and thereby help to promote healing. For example, in the case where the treated area is an injured eye, one can readily appreciate the advantages of wicking away the sticky, humid, muggy eye exudate away from the eye. The facing 31, the carrier tape 32 comprising backing 33 and pressure-sensitive adhesive 34, and release liner 35 of the bandage 40 are the same as those discussed above with reference to FIGS. 2 and 3.

The novel ophthalmic bandage of this invention is easily, accurately, and securely applied by a medical professional or the patients themselves.

* * * * *

File A Patent Application

  • Protect your idea -- Don't let someone else file first. Learn more.

  • 3 Easy Steps -- Complete Form, application Review, and File. See our process.

  • Attorney Review -- Have your application reviewed by a Patent Attorney. See what's included.